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Which clippings match 'Group Work' keyword pg.1 of 1
16 MARCH 2017

Education reform: teaching to topic rather than by subject

"Finland is about to embark on one of the most radical education reform programmes ever undertaken by a nation state – scrapping traditional 'teaching by subject' in favour of 'teaching by topic'.

'This is going to be a big change in education in Finland that we’re just beginning,' said Liisa Pohjolainen, who is in charge of youth and adult education in Helsinki – the capital city at the forefront of the reform programme. ...

Subject-specific lessons – an hour of history in the morning, an hour of geography in the afternoon – are already being phased out for 16-year-olds in the city’s upper schools. They are being replaced by what the Finns call 'phenomenon' teaching – or teaching by topic. For instance, a teenager studying a vocational course might take 'cafeteria services' lessons, which would include elements of maths, languages (to help serve foreign customers), writing skills and communication skills.

More academic pupils would be taught cross-subject topics such as the European Union - which would merge elements of economics, history (of the countries involved), languages and geography.

There are other changes too, not least to the traditional format that sees rows of pupils sitting passively in front of their teacher, listening to lessons or waiting to be questioned. Instead there will be a more collaborative approach, with pupils working in smaller groups to solve problems while improving their communication skills. ...

Finnish schools are obliged to introduce a period of 'phenomenon-based teaching' at least once a year. These projects can last several weeks. In Helsinki, they are pushing the reforms at a faster pace with schools encouraged to set aside two periods during the year for adopting the new approach. Ms Kyllonen’s blueprint, to be published later this month, envisages the reforms will be in place across all Finnish schools by 2020."

(Richard Garner, Friday 20 March 2015, independent.co.uk)

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TAGS

2020applied knowledge • collaborate in classroom teaching • collaboration and learning • collaborative approach • collaborative learning model • cross-subject topics • disciplinary model • disciplinary singulars • education reformeducational modelexemplary modelsFinland • Finnish school system • group workintegrated approachesintegrated curriculuminterdisciplinarityinterdisciplinary approach • Liisa Pohjolainen • phenomenon teaching • phenomenon-based teaching • problem oriented learning model • radical education reform • reform programme • regionalisation of knowledge • school reform • school subjects • school system • student-centred learning (SCL) • subject-specific lessons • teaching by topic • traditional format

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 NOVEMBER 2012

Using Individual Weighting Factor to fairly recognise and compensate individual contributions to group work

"The modified pool of marks technique will not, however, overcome a fundamental weakness of the procedure, namely that the students have to allocate a fixed pool of marks or points. This can be difficult to do using whole numbers. For example, if eight marks are to be allocated between four people and one is given four of them it is not possible to give all the rest the same mark. An alternative technique is to allow the students to allocate marks freely and then calculate an individual weighting factor based on the ratio between the individual score and the average score for all members of the group. This has the advantage of avoiding putting students in the situation where for every additional mark they give to one individual they have to take a mark off another individual. Indeed this is confirmed where a scale of marks is used and students are unconstrained in the marks that they can allocate. In this situation they show a reluctance to make much use of the lower end of the scale and consequently the mean score is well above the middle (average) point of the scale (Conway et al, 1993). Next year, in addition to using the modified pool of marks technique, a variant on the technique used by Conway et al (1993) will also be employed (Appendix 3). This technique awards the group mark to a student who makes an average contribution. Those who make greater (or lesser) contributions receive more (or less) than the original group mark. The method of calculation is described in Appendix 4."

(Mick Healey, 1993, p.4)

Mick Healey "Developing Student Capability Using Peer and Self Assessment: A Preliminary Evaluation of The Distribution of a Pool of Marks Technique for Assessing The Contribution of Individuals to a Group Project", Using Assessment to Develop Capability conference, 1993.

TAGS

1993accountabilityassessment criteriaassessment for learningassessment techniques • Atara Sivan • contribution to the group • David Kember • fairnessgrading schemegroup work • Higher Education for Capability (HEC) • individual accountability • individual contribution • Individual Weighting Factor • learning and teaching • May Wu • measurementmeasuring individual performancemeasuring instrument • Mick Healey • modified pool of marks technique • peer assessment • peer evaluationpeer learningproject work • Robert Conway • student performance

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 AUGUST 2012

Last Chance: 1st year student short film about friendship

"The project has given me a close insight to working with new people and having a responsibility within a crew. I feel as though my knowledge has excelled in the moving image area. I discovered that so much hard work and effort goes into a short five minute production."

(Zoe Stroud, 2012)

Fig.1 This short film called "Last Chance" (2012) was created as part of the coursework for the 1st year Design Practice 2 module in the BA (Hons) Multimedia programme at Nottingham Trent University (UK).

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TAGS

2012 • Bartholomew Bazaz • being put in a group • CanonCanon 7Dclapperboard • close group of friends • colour correctioncoursework • creative knowledge • design project • DSLR cinematography • film pre-production • film producer role • first year art and designfriendship • Georgia Hirth • group project • group workintimate image • Kalab Khaliq • learning experience • learning task • moving imageMultimedia 1st year • Nick Horton • Nick Rood • Nick Rook • Nottingham Trent UniversityNTU Multimediaon locationpartypersonal developmentpersonal research • Phillip Nodding • positive learning experience • production planning • Roma Patelshallow depth of fieldshooting scheduleshort filmstudent filmsstudent work • Tom Roberts • woods • working in a group • Zoe Stroud

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JULY 2012

Computer Supported Collaborative Learning

"CSCL is focused on how collaborative learning supported by technology can enhance peer interaction and work in groups, and how collaboration and technology facilitate sharing and distributing of knowledge and expertise among community members."

(Lasse Lipponen, 2002)

2). Lipponen, L. (2002). "Exploring foundations for computer–supported collaborative learning". Proceedings of the Conference on Computer Support for Collaborative Learning: Foundations for a CSCL Community. Boulder, Colorado, International Society of the Learning Sciences: 72–81.

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TAGS

19962002ACM • CAI • Carmen Egido • collaboration and learningcollaborative learning • collaborative nature • Computer Assisted Instruction • computer assisted learningComputer Supported Collaborative LearningComputer Supported Cooperative Work • CSC • CSCLCSCWeducational technology • emerging paradigm • group workgroupware • human cognition and learning • Intelligent Tutoring Systems • ITS • Jay David Bolter • Jolene Galegher • knowledge distribution • knowledge sharing • Lasse Lipponen • learning and teachinglearning technology • Logo-as-Latin • parallelismpedagogy • peer interaction • Robert Kraut • Roy Pea • Saul Greenberg • sharing and distributing knowledgetechnology and collaborationtechnology facilitated sharing • Timothy Koschmann • University of Helsinki • working in groups

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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