Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Langue And Parole' keyword pg.1 of 1
19 JUNE 2011

A comparable dichotomy between metaphor and metonymy

"Roman Jakobson found a comparable dichotomy between metaphor and metonymy in his seminal paper, 'Two Aspects of Language and Two Types of Aphasic Disturbances,' published in his monograph, Fundamentals of Language (Mouton & Co––Gravenhage, 1956). Here Jakobson discussed two types of aphasia based on complementary disorders in comprehending language: (a) a similarity disorder whereby one primarily depends on syntactic context to draw words into use (pp. 63–64); and (b) a contiguity disorder whereby one's style becomes a telegraphic 'word heap' without much, if any, evidence of syntax (pp. 71–72). According to Jakobson, two faculties are thus involved in the use of language: (a) selection in the choice of words to express an idea (metaphoric); and (b) the combination of words, again to express an idea (metonymic). Elaborate sentences without a particularly impressive vocabulary (for example in the prose of Henry James) illustrates the similarity disorder, while big vocabulary in loosely constructed sentences (for example in the prose of James Joyce) illustrates the contiguity disorder. Joyce heaped together his words with apparent abandonment, while James strenuously belaboured his syntax to produce exactly the right effect––an effect he found difficult to articulate with words alone as opposed to their combination in intricate sentences. An inferior choice of words, Jakobson claimed, is at the sacrifice of metaphor, whereas an inferior combination of words is at the sacrifice of metonymy (p. 76)."

(Edward Jayne)

Jakobson, R. (1971). "Fundamentals of Language". The Hague/Paris: Mouton, Harvard University and Morris Halle, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

1). Edward Jayne. "The Metaphor–Metonymy Binarism"

TAGS

aphasia • choice of wordsClaude Levi-Strauss • combination of words • comprehending language • constructed sentences • contiguitydeconstructionismFerdinand de Saussuregrammar • Henry James • ideasJacques DerridaJacques LacanJames Joyce • John Langshaw Austin • language • langue • langue and parole • Louis Hjelmslev • metaphormetaphoric • metonymic • metonymynaming • paradigmatic relations • parole • Paul de Man • rhetoricRoland Barthes • Roman Jakobson • selection • semiology • semiotics • sentences • signifiedsignifierstructuralism • syntactic context • syntagmatic relations • syntaxtelegraphictropesvocabularyword heapwords

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 APRIL 2005

Parole: dictionary of the contemporary city

"parole is a dynamic dictionary of the contemporary city, or at least this was the intention when it was launched in June 2000 in occasion of the 7th International Exhibition of Architecture at the Biennale in Venice, Italy.

Since then parole has become a vast, loose, heterogeneous website, probably less easily defined with such a stringent term as 'dictionary'.

Currently about 900 words, related to the transformation of the urban landscape, are organised in a hypermedia database, along with more than 1000 links to & from the Internet.

Images, texts, quotations, comments, fragments of text, links to external websites, videos, sounds, webcams are some of the scattered elements which constitute its fragmented mosaic.

parole acts as an open platform for information, discussion, archive, gathering of data, it is a place where much of the material included is directly provided by its users. As in a type of 'Borgesian' dream it establishes a permanently fluid and unstable mapping of the actual urban condition throughout the world, looking at the variations and alterations in language and in the discourse of several different disciplines. Neologisms, slang terms, theories, utopic projects, nicknames attributed to specific sites, urbanism, architecture, anthropology, contemporary art are some of the multiple material included in parole.

As its nature is permanently unstable and deprived of any hierarchy, parole is subject to shifts and alterations towards directions which are actually unpredictable.

In occasion of its different presentations within localised conditions, such as a museum or a gallery space, we have tried to accomplish a certain degree of interaction with the context, in order to allow the project to present a direct vision of the condition of the contemporary city in its permanent state of change."

(Gruppo A12, Udo Noll and Peter Scupelli)

1

TAGS

2000anthropologyarchitecture • architecture biennale • categorisationcityclassificationdictionaryhypertextItalyJorge Luis Borgeslangue and paroleneologism • nicknames • orderingparoleslangtaxonomythesaurusurbanismutopia • Venice
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.