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19 JULY 2014

Using OneNote for gathering design project requirements

"Having a laptop open in a research interview puts a barrier between you and the person you're interviewing, and the typing can be quite distracting and intimidating for the interviewee. But typed notes are searchable, making for very useful reference when you're synthesizing your notes. OneNote is a nice compromise. With a Tablet in slate mode, we remove the physical barrier of the laptop, and as long as you have the pen in a 'Create Handwriting' mode, you can later go back and search your notes as if they were typed. (The handwriting recognition is pretty amazing.)

We sometimes have interviews by phone, and in these cases we often type notes. OneNote can go back and forth pretty seamlessly between handwriting and text, so it keeps all notes in one place. Also I find the quick–keys for adding tags to notes to be very useful when typing. You can tag questions you have, comments for follow–up, and ideas you generate, all with the quick stroke of a key.

For really important meetings, we can also use the audio recording features, which gives the ability to later go back and click on a piece of handwriting to hear what was being said at the time. Unfortunately you have to be using an external microphone for this, or all you hear is the tap–tap–tapping of the stylus hitting the slate surface instead of insightful interview conversation.

And I should note that research is not where OneNote shines the most. There are a few competing tools, like the LiveScribe Echo SmartPen and even pen and paper and that are giving it a run for its money. But as long as we're outfitting our designers with the Tablet, OneNote is a fine tool to use during research."

(Chris Noessel, 7 March 2013, Cooper Journal)

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TAGS

audio recording • client interview • client liaisoncontent integration • content integration tool • design businessdesign objectivesdesign plandesign projectgeneral grounding document • handwriting • handwriting recognition • interaction design • Livescribe Echo Smartpen • managing design • Microsoft OneNote • multimedia toolnotebooknotesnotetakingpen and paperpersonas (UCD) • project reference • project requirements • requirements capture • requirements elicitationrequirements gatheringresearch interviewscope of practicesearchable content • slate mode • synthesising information • Tablet PCtext recognition • typed notes • user storiesvideo documentationworkflow toolworking practices

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2012

Design Guides for Business: Writing a design brief

"A brief is basically a set of instructions that set out what you want your designers to do, along with the objectives and parameters of the design project.

It should make clear what falls within – and outside – the scope of the work. This will help everybody refer back to where they started and make sure that the design work is developing according to your objectives.

It will also help you determine how successful the project has been when you reach the end. ...

Unfortunately, all too often briefs are agreed verbally – but a well–considered brief can act as a general grounding document if the project appears to be heading in the wrong direction, so it's well worth putting something in writing.

And remember, the brief isn't carved in stone; it can be adapted as you go along, as long as it's done in collaboration with everyone involved and the new version is also written down."

(Design Council, UK)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JULY 2012

The Parsons' Masters in Design Studies Programme

"Design studies (like design) is a multifarious enterprise. A branch of the humanities, it comprises a wide range of critical perspectives on the meanings and values embodied in objects and places. It examines the forces that design exerts in, and on, the world – forces design sets in motion but does not control. Parsons' Masters in Design Studies program places particular emphasis on four points: the role of the designer and the design studio in redefining the scope of practice in the 21st century; design as an iteration of aesthetic and intellectual histories that continue to inform the present; the social, political and environmental behaviors and consequences of designing objects, places, situations, and systems today; design as the projection of different futures.

Above all, the MA Design Studies program focuses on the development of articulate, critical voices that can speak to these issues. Students will be prepared to write for the academic context, the design community, and the larger public realm. Working in close proximity to MFA studio programs at Parsons, they also have the opportunity to integrate film, video, and other media into their work."

(Susan Yelavich)

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TAGS

21st centuryaestheticsart and design school • branch of humanities • critical perspectivescritical theory • critical voices • critiquecurriculumdesign community • design consequences • design coursedesign futuresdesign responsibilitydesign studiesdesign studiodesigning objectsdifferent futures • environmental behaviours • history of ideas • intellectual histories • MA • MA Design Studies • masters degree • Masters in Design Studies • multifarious enterprise • objects and places • Parsons The New School for Designplacespolitical behaviourrole of the designerscope of practicesocial behavioursocial changestudio programme • Susan Yelavich • visual culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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