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13 JULY 2016

Cassetteboy vs The Snoopers' Charter

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TAGS

2016Cassetteboycollaged togetherConservative partycut-upcut-up techniquedata securityDavid CameronEvery Breath You Take (song)information privacy • Investigatory Powers Bill • Mark Bolton • mash-uppersonal datapoliticianprivacy policy • privacy protection • re-editre-purposeremix culturesnoopers charter • snooping • social commentary • Steve Warlin • The Police (band) • Theresa MayUK • UK politics • use of private information

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 OCTOBER 2013

The enduring legacy of The World At War

"The World at War had many strengths but the key to its success as compelling history television was the formidable array of interviewees. Top military leaders, including German naval commander Karl Doenitz and the head of RAF Bomber Command, Arthur Harris, had their say alongside humble soldiers, sailors and airmen. Key politicians like wartime foreign secretary Sir Anthony Eden shed light on the war's wider arc, while ordinary citizens told of events from their perspective. Several members of Hitler's inner circle were also tracked down and interviewed, including his valet, secretary and adjutant. Death camp survivors told their terrible tales, as did a few of their shamefaced captors. More years have now passed since the making of The World at War than elapsed between 1945 and the programme's first showing in 1973. So, sadly, a programme like this can never be made again: the number of living witnesses to World War II is dwindling every day. We are fortunate that Isaacs and his team had the vision and talent to make The World at War when they did."

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TAGS

19451973Adolf Hitler • Anthony Eden • archive footage • Arthur Harris • British television • Carl Davis • Charles de Gaulle • Charles Douglas-Home • David Elstein • death camp • definitive account • documentary evidence • foreign secretary • Franklin D. RooseveltHarry Truman • Hideki Tojo • historical chronicleshistory • history television • inner circle • interviews • Jeremy Isaacs • Joseph Stalin • Karl Doenitz • Laurence Olivier • military campaign • military historymilitary leader • naval commander • Nazi • Neville Chamberlain • Noble Frankland • politician • RAF Bomber Command • sailor • social historysoldiersurvivor • Ted Childs • television documentarytelevision programmetelevision seriesThames Television • The World at War • UKTV • warwartimeWinston ChurchillwitnessWorld War II

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 MAY 2007

Yes Prime Minister: parodying Australian Prime Minister

[Yes Prime Minister is an interactive parody of Australia's ex–Prime Minister John Winston Howard. The interactive toy works as a kind of digital 'fridge magnet poetry' through allowing users to re–mix Little Johnny's speeches for humorous effect. The toy was created by the Australian communications agency 'Thought By Them'.]

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TAGS

AustraliaAustralian Liberal Partyconservativeculture jamming • fridge magnet poetry • humourinteractiveJohn HowardLittle Johnnyparodypoliticianpolitician caricaturePrime Ministerright-wing • SameSame • satiresocial conservatismspeech • Thought By Them • toy
10 SEPTEMBER 2005

Ethics Question Satirising Australian Prime Minister

"This test only has one question, but it's a very important one. By giving an honest answer, you will discover where you stand morally. The test features an unlikely, completely fictional situation in which you will have to make a decision. Remember that your answer needs to be honest, yet spontaneous. You are in Darwin, Northern Territory. There is chaos all around you caused by a cyclone with severe flooding. This is a flood of biblical proportions. You are a photojournalist working for a major newspaper, and you're caught in the middle of this epic disaster. The situation is nearly hopeless. You're trying to shoot career–making photos. There are houses and people swirling around you, some disappearing under the water. Nature is unleashing all of its destructive fury. Suddenly you see a man floundering in the water. He is fighting for his life, trying not to be taken down with the debris. You move closer – somehow the man looks familiar. You suddenly realise who it is. It's John Howard. At the same time you notice that the raging waters are about to pull him under. You have two options, you can save the life of 'Little Johnny' or you can shoot a dramatic Pulitzer Prize winning photo, documenting the death of the Australian Prime Minister. So here's the question, and please give an honest answer: Would you select colour film, or would you go with the high contrast black and white?"
(anonymous email)

[This email has likely circulated the Internet for a while. While the specifics of the story may have been altered, its general thrust will likely be the same. Witty emails like this one provide an avenue for public commentary (in this case about the former Australian Prime Minister John Winston Howard).]

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