Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Barcode' keyword pg.1 of 2
09 JANUARY 2013

National Archives of Australia: Archives Viewer

"Say hello to the Archives Viewer (naming things isn't really one of my strengths). Instead of rewriting my existing script I decided to create a completely new web application. Why? Mainly because it gave me a lot more flexibility. I could also make use of a variety of existing tools and frameworks like Django, Bootstrap, Isotope and FancyBox. Standing upon the code of giants, I had the whole thing up and running in a single weekend. The code is available on GitHub.

What does it do? Simply put, just feed the Archives Viewer the barcode of a digitised file in RecordSearch and it grabs the metadata and images and displays them in a variety of useful ways. It's really pretty simple, both in execution and design.

Yep, there's a wall. It's not quite as spacey and zoom–y as the CoolIris version, but perhaps that's a good thing. It's just a flat wall of page image thumbnails with a bit of lightbox–style magic thrown in. But when I say just, well... look for yourself. There's something a bit magical about seeing all the pages of a file at once, taking in their shapes and colours as well as their content. This digital wall provides a strangely powerful reminder of the physical object.

Of course you can also view the file page by page if you want. Printing is a snap – just type in any combination of pages or page ranges and hit the button. The images and metadata are assembled ready to print. No more wondering 'which file did this print out come from?'.

But perhaps the most important feature is that each page has it's own unique, persistent url. Basic stuff, but oh, so important. With a good url you can share and cite. Find something exciting? Tell the world about it! I've included your typical social media share buttons to help you along."

(Tim Sherratt, 29 August 2012)

1

TAGS

Archives Viewer • barcodeBootstrap (toolkit)collections • CoolIris • digital humanities • Django • FancyBox • GitHub • image viewer • Invisible Australians • Isotope • lightboxmetadataNational Archives of Australia • persistent url • RecordSearch • Tim Sherratt • web applicationwhite Australia policy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 SEPTEMBER 2011

Tesco opens virtual store in South Korea

"Tesco Homeplus in South Korea has opened what it claims is the world's first virtual store in Seoul subway, following an initial trial in July.

Using the walls of the Seonreung subway station in downtown Seoul, Tesco has displayed more than 500 of its most popular products with barcodes which customers can scan using the Homeplus app on their smartphones, then get it delivered to their homes.

It opens on the same day that in the UK Ocado unveiled its virtual shopping wall at London's One New Change shopping centre.

In Seoul, Tesco shoppers scanning products on their way to work can get a delivery that evening if the order is placed before 11.30am. The store will be open for three months.

It follows an advert Tesco ran in South Korea in July for a virtual shopping wall, created by Cheil Worldwide. The initial launch created excitement so Tesco decided to push ahead with a full launch."

(Jennifer Creevy, 25 August, 2011, Retail Week)

1
2

TAGS

2011barcode • Cheil Worldwide • digital storedigital storefrontdigitally enhanced shop • downtown Seoul • dwell time • home delivery • Homeplus app • Koream-commercemobile commercenon-place • One New Change (shopping centre) • QR codesQuick Response coderetail conceptsretail spaceretail storeretailing • Seonreung subway station • Seoulshoppingshopping experiencesingle-minded spacesSouth Koreastore of the futurestorefrontsubwaytechnological innovationTesco • Tesco Homeplus • UK Ocado • virtual shop • virtual shopping • virtual shopping wall • virtual store

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 NOVEMBER 2010

Esquire uses 2D bar codes within magazine for mobile commerce

"By using the mobile device's camera and the ScanLife application, Esquire readers can scan the feature's bar codes to instantly buy items of clothing and accessories seen within the magazine article. ...

Each article of clothing in The Esquire Collection has its own unique black–and–white 2D bar code. When consumers scan the code with their device's camera, a menu will appear on screen that lets them perform several functions, including buying the item.

The Buy Now feature on the menu lets readers buy an item, get an itemized description and obtain additional information about items seen directly in the magazine.

Consumers can click Learn More About This Item to be taken to a URL where they learn more about the product, the brand, or alternative versions of the product.

Scanning a bar code will also give consumers the option to be redirected to a URL where they can enter their ZIP [post] code and find the brand's nearest retail location.

An update in the near future will let the GPS on the mobile device alert readers to the location closest to them.

Additionally, the scanned bar code will bring the user to an Esquire–branded URL that gives advice on how to style the item for his look or wardrobe."

(Chris Harnick, 4 February 2010, Mobile Commerce Daily)

1

TAGS

2010 • 2D bar code • augmented realitybarcodecameraphoneclothingconsumerdigital mediaEsquire MagazinefashionGPS • Hearst Communications Inc • interactive magazine • locationmarketingmedia convergencemobilemobile browsermobile commerceold mediaprintprint mediapublishingQR codesQuick Response codescan • Scanbuy • ScanLife • smartphonetransformationURL • wardrobe

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 JANUARY 2009

I think, therefore I shop

"This is the catalog for a special exhibition curated by Murray Moss at the MAK museum in Frankfurt, Germany in August 2002."
(RETAIL21c)

[catalogue title paraphrasing the famous logical statement by René Descartes 'I think, therefore I am']

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 NOVEMBER 2007

Cellphone-readable Physical Hyperlinks To The Free Online Encyclopedia Wikipedia

Alexis Robin Rondeau and Stan Michael Wiechers (Semapedia.org)
Semapedia.org is a non–profit, community–driven project founded September 2005. Our goal is to connect the virtual and physical world by bringing the right information from the internet to the relevant place in physical space.

We believe that bringing knowledge to where it matters changes minds and worlds. Our motivation to create Semapedia is to let everyone collaboratively physically hyperlink their world, thus sharing knowledge and making it accessible to others in a helpful and meaningful way. We strongly believe bringing knowledge to places and things that matter to others is a great way to help others understand our beautiful and complex world.

1

TAGS

annotationbarcodeJavamobilephonephysical annotationscan • Semapedia • tag • University of Vienna • Wikipedia
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.