Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Police' keyword pg.1 of 2
07 JULY 2015

Britain on Film: collection of archive footage goes online today

"Around 2,500 films including home movies, documentaries and news footage from Victorian times up to the 1980s is now available online.

The grainy footage is of dozens of shifty men in flat caps, smoking cigarettes, talking to each other in a market square, some exchanging money, others nervously keeping watch. And then men in trilbies spring from nowhere, making arrests and bundling people into vans. The remarkable surveillance footage is from 1935 and is significant because it was the first film used as evidence in a British court of law. Police, or specifically PC Saunders – proudly named in the end credit – filmed what was an illegal betting ring going on in Chesterfield’s market square.

The film is one of around 2,500 from the BFI archives – that are now accessible online, via the BFI Player, from Tuesday as part of a huge project called Britain on Film. They include home movies, documentaries and news footage from Victorian times to as recently as 1980."

(Mark Brown, 07 July 2015)

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1935BFI • BFI archives • BFI National Archive • BFI Player • Britain on Film • British Film Institute • court of law • cultural heritagedigitisation projectfilm archive • flat cap • grainy footage • illegal behaviour • illegal betting ring • market square • national cultural heritage onlinenational film archivenews footagepolice • shifty men • social history • surveillance footage • trilby

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2014

The Phantom of Liberty: humorous critique of bourgeois conventions

"Luis Buñuel's The Phantom of Liberty was quickly dismissed upon its release in 1974. Not only did it have to contend with the lingering success of 1972's similarly themed but significantly less abstract The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, but it was quickly followed by the dreamlike, bi–polar romantic entanglement of the director's last film, That Obscure Object of Desire. Like Discreet Charm, the plot–free Phantom of Liberty is a patchwork of comedic sketches and sight gags through which Buñuel ravages a complacent European culture and the various sexual hang–ups and historical and cultural disconnects of its inhabitants. This heady, almost off–putting masterwork isn't particularly easy to decipher (maybe we aren't meant to), which is why it's best to approach it as a literal comedy of manners.

Films structured around daisy chains of dysfunction are a dime a dozen; most, though, are as tiresomely long–winded as they are content with their own strained circularity. This isn't the case with Phantom of Liberty, which begins with a shot of Goya's 1808 masterpiece 'The Third of May.' The painting depicts Napoleon's army executing a group of faceless Spaniards, and via a reenactment of this struggle, Buñuel depicts how one of Napoleon's captains tries to defile the monument of Doña Elvira only to be smacked on the head by the moving arm of the statue of the woman's husband. (He later intends to sleep with the woman's corpse, and when he opens her coffin, he's amazed by how her beauty has been preserved.) It's the first of many sight gags in the film, each and every one as startling as they are perversely funny. All these moments are possessed by a sense of shocked wonderment and discovery, and they all more or less evoke fragile pasts and characters trying to reconcile their historical detachments."

(Ed Gonzalez, 13 September 2003, Slant Magazine)

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1974absurd situationsabsurdist humourabsurdity • Adolfo Celi • Adriana Asti • Anne-Marie Deschott • apparition • Arch de Triomphe • archaic rules • Bernard Verley • black humour • bourgeois • bourgeoise societycancer • chance encounter • cigarettes • Claude Pieplu • coffin • comedic sketches • comedycomedy of mannerscorpsecritiquecultural conventionscultural pastdaughterdining practicesdinner tabledisappearancedoctor • Dona Elvira • eatingepisodic structureetiquetteEuropean cinema • European culture • faith • Francois Maistre • girl • Goya • Helene Perdriere • hotel • housemaid • humour • impulses • internal logic • intrusion • Jean Rochefort • Jean-Claude Brialy • Julien Bertheau • Le Fantome de la Liberte (1974) • Luis Bunuel • mailman • masterwork • Michael Lonsdale • Michel Piccoli • Milena Vukotic • Monica Vitti • Montparnasse • morality • nanny • narrative preconceptions • obscene • ostrich • parodypatchwork • Paul Frankeur • phallicphallic symbol • Philippe Brigaud • Pierre Maguelon • policepolite societypostcard • postman • psychoanalysisritual • rooster • rulesschool • schoolchildren • Serge Silberman • sexual hang-ups • sexual taboo • sight gag • sketch comedy • sniper • social behavioursocial conventionsSpanish filmsubconscioussurrealist cinemasurrealist filmmakertaboo • That Obscure Object of Desire (1977) • The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972) • The Phantom of Liberty (1974) • The Third of May (1808) • toilettriptych • vanished • visual gagzoo

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MARCH 2013

VFX breakdowns for BBC One TV series Ripper Street

"With a final dollop of blood splatter sploshing across the plasma TV, Series One of BBC's visceral police drama Ripper Street came to a crashing finish on Sunday night!

Screen Scene VFX completed all the visual effects work on Ripper Street's first season, and are proud to share this fantastic breakdown/making of video showing you how they weaved their inimitable brand of wizardry to make Dublin look like Victorian London."

(Screen Scene Post Production Facilities, 26 February 2013)

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18892013 • Adam Rothenberg • BBC One • BBC series • BBC TV • blood splatter • breakdown • chaotic streets • compositingcostume dramaDublin • Ed Bruce • EdBruceVFX • H Division • Jerome Flynn • Joe Gilgun • London East End • making of • Mathew Macfadyen • police • police drama • post production • Richard Warlow • Ripper Street • scene designscenery • Screen Scene Post Production Facilities • Screen Scene VFX • SFXtelevisionTV seriesVFX • Victorian London • visceralvisual effectsvisual spectacle • Whitechape

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 APRIL 2012

The amateur video which sparked the 1992 Los Angeles Civil Unrest

"in March 1991, television screens across the world broadcast [George Holliday's] videotaped footage of LAPD officers raining down 56 baton blows on an African American named Rodney King. ... on April 29, 1992, a jury in Simi Valley, one of the whitest exurbs of Los Angeles, acquitted three of the four officers involved in beating Rodney King. The response in South Los Angeles was loud and immediate: That night, thousands of residents, black and Latino, took to the streets, starting a four–day riot that destroyed more than 1,000 buildings, injured 2,500 people, killed 58, and resulted in $1 billion in damage and 16,000 arrests."

(Josh Sides, 19/04/2012, Design Observer)

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19911992 • 1992 Los Angeles Civil Unrest • acquitted • African Americanamateuramateur cameraamateur videoarsonassault • baton • beating • brutalitybystandercitiescitizen journalismcivic engagementcivil disobediencecivil libertiescivil rights • civil unrest • damageethics • exurb • eyewitnessforce of law • George Holliday • high-speed pursuit • Hispanic • injusticejustice • LAPD • Latasha Harlins • Latino • looting • Los Angeles • Los Angeles Police Department • Los Angeles Riots • manslaughter • motoristmurderpolicepolice brutality • police officer • povertypower corrupts • property damages • real behaviourriot • rioted • riots • Rodney King • self-control • Simi Valley • social differentiationsocial responsibility • South Central Riots • suffering injustice • television report • unethical behaviourunjustunjust powervideotapedvideotaped footage

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 FEBRUARY 2012

Overcoding, Coding, and Recoding

"...The social axiomatic of modern societies is caught between two poles and is constantly oscillating from one pole to the other. Born of decoding and deterritorialization, on the ruins of the despotic machine, these societies are caught between the Urstaat that they would like to resuscitate as an overcoding and reterritorializing unity, and the unfettered flows that carry them toward an absolute threshold. They recode with all their might, with world–wide dictatorship, local dictators, and an all–powerful police, while decoding – or allowing the decoding of – the fluent quantities of their capital and their populations. They are torn in two directions: archaism and futurism, neoarchaism and ex–futurism, paranoia and schizophrenia. They vacillate between two poles: the paranoiac despotic sign, the sign–signifier of the despot that they try to revive as a unit of code; and the sign–figure of the schizo as a unit of decoded flux, a schiz, a point–sign or flow–break. They try to hold on to the one, but they pour or flow out through the otaxher. They are continually behind or ahead of themselves."

(Deleuze and Guattari 1983, 260)

TAGS

a point-sign • a schiz • all-powerful • archaism • capital • continually ahead of themselves • continually behind themselves • cultural code • decoded flux • decoding • despot • despotic • despotic machine • deterritorialisation • dictatorship • ex-futurism • Felix Guattariflow • flow-break • flows • fluent quantities • FuturismGilles Deleuzeglobal capital flows • local dictators • neoarchaism • oscillating • overcodingparanoia • paranoiac • pole to pole • police • populations • pour • Recode • resuscitate • reterritorialising unity • schizo • schizophrenia • sign-figure • sign-signifier • social axiomatic of modern societies • societies • threshold • torn in two directions • unfettered flows • Urstaat • vacillate between two poles • world-wide dictatorship

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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