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Which clippings match 'Poetics' keyword pg.1 of 1
28 MAY 2013

Discourse analysis: a transdisciplinary field for studying text and talk

"Discourse analysis emerged as a new transdisciplinary field of study between the mid–1960s and mid–1970s in such disciplines as anthropology, ethnography, microsociology, cognitive and social psychology, poetics, rhetoric, stylistics, linguistics, semiotics, and other disciplines in the humanities and social sciences interested in the systematic study of the structures, functions, and processing of text and talk"

(Teun Adrianus van Dijk, p.109)

Teun Adrianus van Dijk (2002). Media contents The Interdisciplinary study of news as discourse. "A Handbook of Qualitative Methodologies for Mass Communication Research". N. W. Jankowski and K. B. Jensen, Routledge.

TAGS

anthropologycognitive psychologydiscourse analysisethnographyhandbookhumanities • Klaus Bruhn Jensen • linguisticsmass communication • mass communication research • microsociology • Nicholas Jankowski • Poeticsqualitative methodologiesresearchresearch methodsresearch resourcesrhetoricsemioticssocial psychologysocial sciencesstructuresstylistics • systematic study • talk • Teun Adrianus van Dijk • text and talk • textual analysis • transdisciplinary field

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 OCTOBER 2011

Aristotle: a whole composed of causal relationships

"Now, according to our definition Tragedy is an imitation of an action that is complete, and whole, and of a certain magnitude; for there may be a whole that is wanting in magnitude. A whole is that which has a beginning, a middle, and an end. A beginning is that which does not itself follow anything by causal necessity, but after which something naturally is or comes to be. An end, on the contrary, is that which itself naturally follows some other thing, either by necessity, or as a rule, but has nothing following it. A middle is that which follows something as some other thing follows it. A well constructed plot, therefore, must neither begin nor end at haphazard, but conform to these principles."

(Aristotle, The Poetics, Part VII, The Internet Classics Archive)

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TAGS

a whole • Aristotle • beginning • causal necessity • causal relationshipscausalitycausally related narrative events • character-centred causality • Classical narrativeEdward Tufte • end • haphazard • imitation of action • literaturemiddleplot • plot construction • Poeticsprinciplestragedy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 FEBRUARY 2006

Spectacle as Show: not an inferior part of tragedy

"In a brief but suggestive passage from his Ten Books on Architecture, Leone Battista Alberti, the fifteenth–century Renaissance poet, philosopher, and architect, sets public performance into a frame of social exchange. His subject being architecture, he arrives in his eighth book at the point of discussing 'Places for publick Shows.' ...

In placing the Actor within the wider category of public shows, Alberti reminds us of the organic connections among all forms of performance. He is at the opposite pole from Aristotle who considered drama a branch of literary art. What Alberti identifies as Show, Aristotle catalogued as an inferior part of tradegy: spectacle. Alberti's practice coincided with and reinforced the practice of his contemporaries and successors. Until the renaissance, most of these were rhetoricians. Their five parts of rhetoric–the number into which the subject was most frequently divided–included delivery. Here, it would seem, was an opportunity to discuss public performance since delivery concerned the manner of speaking. But quite contrary. Writing on delivery illustrates the conventional and persistent subordination of the event of speaking to the composition of speech. So prevalent was this way of ordering the parts of rhetoric and poetics that rare indeed was the person who conceived of performance as an independent entity."
(Bernard Beckerman, 1990)

Beckerman, Bernard. 1990 p.Prologue X. Theatratical Presentation, New York, USA: Routledge.

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TAGS

aesthetic spectacleamazementarchitectureAristotleastonishmentawe • Bernard Beckerman • curiositydramaemotional immersionEuropean Renaissanceexhilarating experienceLeon Battista Alberti • marvel • narrativeorderingperformance • performance spectacle • Places for publick Shows • Poeticspublic shows • puzzlement • rhetoricshockshow (spectacle)social exchangespacespectaclesurprise • Ten Books on Architecture • theatretragedy • wonder • wonderment
04 NOVEMBER 2003

Aristotle: tragedy is the imitation of an action

"Again, Tragedy is the imitation of an action; and an action implies personal agents, who necessarily possess certain distinctive qualities both of character and thought; for it is by these that we qualify actions themselves, and these– thought and character– are the two natural causes from which actions spring, and on actions again all success or failure depends. Hence, the Plot is the imitation of the action– for by plot I here mean the arrangement of the incidents. By Character I mean that in virtue of which we ascribe certain qualities to the agents. Thought is required wherever a statement is proved, or, it may be, a general truth enunciated. Every Tragedy, therefore, must have six parts, which parts determine its quality– namely, Plot, Character, Diction, Thought, Spectacle, Song. Two of the parts constitute the medium of imitation, one the manner, and three the objects of imitation. And these complete the fist. These elements have been employed, we may say, by the poets to a man; in fact, every play contains Spectacular elements as well as Character, Plot, Diction, Song, and Thought.

According to Aristotle every tragedy has 6 parts, appearing in order from most important to least important: Plot; Character; Diction; Thought; Spectacle; Song."

(Aristotle)

1). Aristotle (350 B.C.E). 'Poetics', Part VI, translated by Samuel Henry Butcher.

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TAGS

actionAristotlecausally related narrative eventscharacterClassicaldiction • hierarchy of form • imitationplotPoetics • Samuel Henry Butcher • songspectaclethoughttragedy • Tragedy as imitation (Aristotle)
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