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Which clippings match 'Poem' keyword pg.1 of 1
05 OCTOBER 2014

The Man with the Beautiful Eyes: life lessons in childhood

"Charles Bukowski was a creature of perplexity and paradox, oscillating between romantic pessimism and luminous wisdom on the meaning of life, propelled by an outrageous daily routine. His expressive poems explored everything from the myths of creativity to his 'friendly advice' to young men.

In 1999, British animator Jonathan Hodgson and illustrator Jonny Hannah teamed up on a breathtaking animated adaptation of Bukowski's 1992 poem 'the man with the beautiful eyes' from his final and arguably best poetry collection, The Last Night of the Earth Poems."

(Maria Popova, Brain Pickings)

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TAGS

199219992D animationabandoned houseallegoryanimatorbamboo • beautiful eyes • Brain Pickings (blog) • bright eyes • Charles Bukowski • childhood imagination • cigar • fearfear of the unknownfish pond • goldfish • hand-drawn animationhand-painted stop motion animationillustrative styleillustrator • Jonathan Bairstow • Jonathan Hodgson • Jonny Hannah • life lessons • Louis Schendler • meaning of life • Peter Blegvad • poempoetpoetry • romantic pessimism • Sherbet (production company) • strong and beautiful • Tarzan • The Last Night of the Earth Poems (Charles Bukowski) • The Man with the Beautiful Eyes (1992) • underlying order • unsettling fear • whisky

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 APRIL 2011

Heavy Water: a film for Chernobyl

"On April 26th, 1986, reactor four at Chernobyl nuclear power station explodes, sending an enormous radioactive cloud over Northern Ukraine and neighbouring Belarus. The danger is kept a secret from the rest of the world and the nearby population who go about their business as usual. May Day celebrations begin, children play and the residents of Pripyat marvel at the spectacular fire raging at the reactor. After three days, an area the size of England becomes contaminated with radioactive dust, creating a 'zone' of poisoned land.

Produced by Seventh Art Productions and based on Mario Petrucci's award–winning book–length poem, Heavy Water: a film for Chernobyl tells the story of the people who dealt with the disaster at ground–level: the fire–fighters, the soldiers, the 'liquidators', and their families."

(Seventh Art Productions)

'Heavy Water: a film for Chernobyl' (2007). Directed by David Bickerstaff and Phil Grabsky, Poetry by Mario Petrucci, 52 minutes

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TAGS

1986 • 25th anniversary • BelarusChernobylconsequencescontaminationdisasterdocumentaryenvironment • explosion • familyfilmfilm essayfirefirefighter • heavy water • Heavy Water (film) • legacy • liquidator • Mario Petrucci • May Day celebrations • mortalitynuclear disasternuclear power stationnuclear reactorpersonal storypoempoisonPripyatradiationradioactiveradioactive contaminationradioactive dustsecret • Seventh Art Productions • soldierUkrainezone

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 DECEMBER 2008

Recombinant prose poem: What I Heard about Iraq

"...I heard an American soldier say: 'There's a picture of the World Trade Center hanging up by my bed and I keep one in my Kevlar. Every time I feel sorry for these people I look at that. I think: 'They hit us at home and now it's our turn.'..."
(Eliot Weinberger)

LRB, Vol. 27 No. 3, 3 February 2005

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TAGS

Afghanistanal-Qaidabelligerence • Colin Powell • Condoleezza Rice • Dick Cheney • Donald Rumsfeld • Eliot Weinberger • George W BushIraqlistnarrativepeacepoem • prose poem • quotere-purposerecombinant • Saddam Hussein • soldierState of the UnionstoryTony BlairUnited States Armed Forceswar • weapons of mass destruction • What I Heard about Iraq • World Trade Center

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JUNE 2004

Archaeology-poem: Multiple Registers

the formation of the archaeology–poem, made up of multiple registers, but equally of the particular inscription of an articulation linked in turn to events, institutions and all sorts of other practices.
(Gilles Deleuze)

TAGS

archaeologyGilles DeleuzeMichel Foucaultpoem • register
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