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21 OCTOBER 2012

International MINA Mobile Innovation Screening 2012

"The International Mobile Innovation Screening 2012 will showcase an international screening programme of mobile short films. Simultaniously the MINA [Mobile Innovation Network Aotearoa] Mobile Creativity and Innovation Symposium opening reception will take place at the New Zealand Film Archive in Wellington, Te Anakura Whitiahua, on the 23rd November 2012.

MINA reception (6.30pm) and mobile film screening (7pm–8pm)

The 2nd International Mobile Creativity and Mobile Innovation symposium hosted at Massey University Wellington, on 24th/25th November, will provide a platform for filmmakers, artists, researchers and industry professionals to debate the prospect of wireless, mobile and ubiquitous technologies in a changing art and design environment and the transforming creative industries."

(MINA, Aotearoa New Zealand)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Max Schleser
15 JULY 2012

The New Zealand Film Archive

"Established in 1981, the Film Archive is an independent charitable trust overseen by a Board of Trustees representing film, archival, Maori and community interests. The Film Archive's constitution and kaupapa express a commitment to collect, protect and connect New Zealand's film and television history.

When an item is in the care of the Archive, it is considered the property of the depositor. Subsequently the copyright for the material remains with the legal rights holders.

The collections of predominantly New Zealand film, video and television date from 1895 to the present day. Every genre of filmmaking – feature films, documentaries, short films, home movies, newsreels, television programmes and film and television advertisements – is represented. There is also a significant documentation collection which includes publicity materials, stills, posters, production records, props, costumes and equipment housed in Wellington.

As there is no statutory deposit legislation for film in New Zealand, material is deposited voluntarily – and without cost to the depositor. Maintaining a kaitiaki role over the collections the Film Archive's guardianship ensures ownership of the original item remains with the depositor and copyright is maintained by the appropriate parties. In the case of material with Maori content, the Film Archive actively maintains relationships with whanau/hapu/iwi to ensure appropriate long term care and access."

(New Zealand Film Archive)

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TAGS

18951981advertisementAotearoa New ZealandarchivalarchiveAustralasia • care and access • collectioncostumecultural heritagedocumentarydocumentationfeature film • film advertisement • film and television history • film archivefilm historyfilmmaking • guardianship • hapu • home movie • independent charitable trust • iwilegal rights holders • long term access • long term care • long term care and access • moving imageNew Zealand cinemaNew Zealand cultureNew Zealand Film ArchivenewsreelNZ Film Archive • production records • publicity materials • publicity posters • publicity stills • short filmtelevision advertisement • television history • television programmeWellington • whana

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 NOVEMBER 2005

Horseplay: Discussing Philip's Work At His Waimate Farm

Horseplay is a short 16mm documentary made by Simon Perkins about the New Zealand painter Philip Trusttum. The film presents a brief snap–shot of the artist and his surroundings at his farm in Waimate. The approach of the documentary makes no attempt to disguise the role of the filmmaker. In this way it pays homage to the Direct Cinema traditions through its use of hand–held camera, voyeuristic shots and off–camera audio.

The film was made in 1990 by: Simon Perkins; Peter Bannan; Vivienne Stone; Peter Evans; Robert Sarkies; Michael Brown; Philip Trusttum; Lee Trusttum; Peter Leech; James Wallace.

Fig.1 Simon Perkins (1990). 'Horseplay' 16mm, 9 minutes.

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24 FEBRUARY 2004

A disturbing little film called A Little Death

"It's a long time since I've seen a film as genuinely disturbing as A Little Death. The title refers to the phrase 'un petite mort'. French slang for orgasm. This surreal film explores all the ambiguity of that phrase to devastating effect. A couple are making love. Or rather having sex – the hostility between them is palpable. The moment of climax flings them both into another dimension where the emotional savagery of their relationship is played out for real. Luscious colour photography gives way to crisp black and white, as Davison crashes through their bed into an identical room where everything, including her lover, is literally two–dimensional, bleached of life but tilled with an almost impersonal hatred. The tension that previously simmered beneath the surface is unleashed in images of extraordinary violence. Brophy, trapped in the 'wallpaper' of this unnatural room, can only scream as she takes her revenge. This ambitious script is well supported by its technically immaculate execution. It is tightly constructed, beautifully edited and the superb soundtrack is unusually effective, an integral part of the film rattler than (as too often happens) an afterthought. Much of the power of the film has to do with its purely visual logic, it didn't start to make sense to me until I stopped trying to figure out what was going on and just let the images wash over me. This is one of those rare films that can stand repeated viewings (providing you can) and serious philosophical debate, despite the fact its violent take on gender relations is more than a little disturbing. A Little Death is an uncommonly brave and passionate piece of filmmaking that stays in the mind long after it's been seen."

(Pavement magazine, 1995)

Fig.1 Simon Perkins and Paul Swadel (1994). "A Little Death", James Wallace Productions: 16mm, 11 minutes. [A Little Death externalises conflict between characters through the use of physical obstacles and camera perspectives. The film is an evolution of the "Into The Void" project.]
Fig.2 Natalie Robertson (1994). Josephine Davison is confused to find herself on a photocopied floor.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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