Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Placeness' keyword pg.1 of 1
05 AUGUST 2012

Hannah Starkey: reconstructed scenes from everyday life

"Using actors within carefully considered settings, Hannah Starkey's photographs reconstruct scenes from everyday life with the concentrated stylisation of film. Starkey's images picture women engaged in regular routines such as loitering in the street, sitting in cafes, or passively shopping. Starkey captures these generic 'in between' moments of daily life with a sense of relational detachment. Her still images operate as discomforting 'pauses'; where the banality of existence is freeze–framed in crisis point, creating reflective instances of inner contemplation, isolation, and conflicting emotion.

Through the staging of her scenes, Starkey's images evoke suggestive narratives through their appropriation of cultural templates: issues of class, race, gender, and identity are implied through the physical appearance of her models or places. Adopting the devices of filmography, Starkey's images are intensified with a pervasive voyeuristic intrusion, framing moments of intimacy for unapologetic consumption. Starkey often uses composition to heighten this sense of personal and emotional disconnection, with arrangements of lone figures separated from a group, or segregated with metaphoric physical divides such as tables or mirrors.

Often titling her work as Untitled, followed by a generalised date of creation, her photographs parallel the interconnected vagueness of memory, recalling suggestions of events and emotions without fixed location or context. Her work presents a platform where fiction and reality are blurred, illustrating the gap between personal fragility and social construction, and merging the experiences of strangers with our own."

(Saatchi Gallery)

1

2

TAGS

artificeawkwardnessbanalitycinematic conventionscultural appropriationcultural signals • cultural templates • daily lifedetachmentemotionlesseveryday life • fiction and reality • film stylisationframed momentsfreeze frame • Hannah Starkey • in-betweenin-between narratives • inner contemplation • intimacyintrospectionisolation • loitering • momentsnarrative photographynarrative scenesobservationpausephotographyplaceness • regular routines • routineSaatchi Galleryscene reconstructionsettingstagingstylisedsuggestive narrativesvignette • voyeuristic intrusion

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 OCTOBER 2011

Rabbits: three rabbits live with a fearful mystery

"In a nameless city, deluged by a continuous rain, three rabbits live with a fearful mystery. Rabbits is a 9 episode sitcom featuring Naomi Watts, Laura Elena Harring, and Scott Coffey."

(LynchNet)

1

TAGS

2002anthropomorphism • anti-realist aesthetics • apartmentbizarre • continuous rain • daily lifeDavid Lynchdehumanisationdistanced viewpointdistanciation • episodic • hare • humanoid rabbits • in and out • independent cinemaironing • Laura Elena Harring • mise-en-scenemystery • nameless city • Naomi Wattsotherworldlinessplacenessproscenium archrabbit • Rabbits (2002) • scene • Scott Coffey • series of episodes • sitcom • sitting on a couch • solo singing • strangestrangenesssurrealist filmmakertheatrical space • three rabbits • unnatural roomvisual designweird

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JANUARY 2006

The Choreography of Awkward and Dehumanised Spaces

"The seven characters in the film 'Dictio pii' (2001) move about in a vacant hotel, but the viewer cannot discern a specific intention that might motivate their peculiar conventicle. Doors swing open and oddly clad figures step forward, only to disappear again in the next room."
(Siemens AG 2006)

Markus Schinwald (2001) 'Dictio pii', single–screen projection with five 35mm films transferred to DVD, duration, each: 3 minutes 16 sec overall display dimensions variable installation.

1
2

08 OCTOBER 2003

Placelessness: Alphaville

There are numerous films that deal with issues relating to non–place. One key example if the 1965 film Alphaville, made by Jean Luc Godard about a futuristic city where its inhabitants are controlled/programmed by a central computer. At no time during the film does it feel that any of the inhabitants actually reside or belong to the city. The city appears to be a conduit between the objectives of its master and it's subjects. The city is a non–place that facilitates occupation and transport without offering placement. The institutional nature of engagement within the narrative space reinforces this. Rooms speak their status without addressing anyone specifically, compass references are offered but without any clear connection to a specific geography. The only avenue for escape for the film's protagonist (and his love–interest), is to exit through another non–place: one of the city's interstate highways.

1
2

Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.