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Which clippings match 'Placeless Place' keyword pg.1 of 1
28 NOVEMBER 2014

Videographer uses drone to capture footage of Pripyat, Chernobyl

"Some tragedies never end. Ask people to name a nuclear disaster and most will probably point to Fukushima in Japan three years ago. The nuclear meltdown at Chernobyl in Ukraine was 30 years ago, but the crisis is still with us today. That's because radiation virtually never dies. After the explosion in 1986, the Soviets built a primitive sarcophagus, a tomb to cover the stricken reactor. But it wasn't meant to last very long and it hasn't. Engineers say there is still enough radioactive material in there to cause widespread contamination. For the last five years a massive project has been underway to seal the reactor permanently. But the undertaking is three quarters of a billion dollars short and the completion date has been delayed repeatedly. Thirty years later, Chernobyl's crippled reactor still has the power to kill."

(Bob Simon, 23 November 2014, CBS News)

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TAGS

19862014 • 60 Minutes • abandoned places in Eastern Europebarren land • Bob Simon • building and ruinsCanon 7DCBS NewsChernobylcontaminationdangerous placesDanny Cookedeserted places • desolate • desolate space • devastated place • devastation • DJI Phantom 2 • droneFukushima • ghost town • GoPro • Hannah Miller • liminal space • neglected land • no mans landnon-placenuclear disaster • nuclear meltdown • nuclear reactor • overgrown • physical destructionplaceless placeplacelessnesspreservationPripyatquadcopterradiation • radioactive material • ruin • ruinssarcophagustime capsuletombUkraine • urban desert • videographer • wasteland

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MARCH 2014

A portal to the underworld in Jean Cocteau's Orphée (1950)

"Jean Cocteau's update of the Orpheus myth depicts a famous poet (Jean Marais), scorned by the Left Bank youth, and his love for both his wife, Eurydice (Marie Déa), and a mysterious princess (Maria Casarès). Seeking inspiration, the poet follows the princess from the world of the living to the land of the dead, through Cocteau's famous mirrored portal. Orpheus's peerless visual poetry and dreamlike storytelling represent the legendary Cocteau at the height of his powers."

(The Criterion Collection)

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1950after deathafterlifeallegoryblack and whiteboundary-crossing • Classical mythology • contemplating mortality • Criterion Collection • deathdreamdreamlike storytellingEurydicefantasy about deathglass portalgloveheterotopiain-limboJean CocteauJean Marais • land of the dead • Left Bank youth • legendlove • love and death • love story • Maria Casares • Marie Dea • mirror • mirrored portal • mortalitymythOrphee (1950)Orpheus • Orpheus (1950) • Orpheus myth • otherworldlinessplaceless placeplacelessnesspoetportalprincessSFXspecial effectssurrealist cinemathreshold spaceunderworld • visual poetry • visual spectaclewaterwife • world of the living

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 MARCH 2005

The Mirror is both a Utopia and a Heterotopia

"The mirror is a utopia after all, since it is a placeless place. In the mirror I see myself where I am not, in an unreal space that opens up virtually behind the surface; I am over there where I am not, a kind of shadow that gives me my own visibility, that enables me to look at myself there where I am absent – a mirror utopia. But it is also a heterotopia in that the mirror really exists, in that it has a sort of return effect on the place that I occupy. Due to the mirror, I discover myself absent at the place where I am, since I see myself over there. From that gaze which settles on me, as it were, I come back to myself and I begin once more to direct my eyes toward myself and to reconstitute myself there where I am. The mirror functions as a heterotopia in the sense that it makes this place which I occupy at the moment when I look at myself in the glass both utterly real, connected with the entire space surrounding it, and utterly unreal – since, to be perceived, it is obliged to go by way of that virtual point which is over there."

(Michel Foucault, 1994, p.179)

Michel Foucault (1994). "Of Other Spaces: Utopias and Heterotopias".

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heterotopia • in the mirror • Michel Foucaultmirror • Pascal Gielen • placeless placeshadowutopia
08 OCTOBER 2003

In-Transit: The Devil's Mode

"The character, Mr. Paxton in Anthony Burgess' novel The Devil's Mode has thrown away his passport after entering the nowhere of departure lounges and planes, filled his pockets with air tickets and is determined to spend the rest of his life in the nowhere and comfortable emptiness of planes and airports is, of course, a rather unusual personage –(Burgess, 1989).'God almighty,' I said. What he showed me was a large yellow plastic folder crammed with air tickets. He said, riffling through them: 'Going everywhere. Rio de Janeiro, Valparaiso, wherever that is, Mozambique, Sydney, Christchurch, Honolulu, Moscow. 'If there's one place where you'll need a visa, it's certainly Moscow,' I said. 'But, damn it, how do you propose to go anywhere without a passport?' There's going and going,' he said. 'When I get to one place then I start off right away for another. Well, in some cases not right away. There's a fair amount of waiting in some of the places. But they have what they call transit lounges. Get a wash and a brush–up. Perhaps a bath. Throw a dirty shirt away and buy a new one. Ditto for socks and underpants. No trouble, really. 'In effect,' I said, astonished, 'you'll be travelling without arriving. 'You could put it that way.' –(Burgess, 1989: 141).Burgess' character provides a clear demonstration of the cultural emptiness entailed in this peculiar expression of modernity. An uprooted man who had lost everything that connected him to the thick, rich meaning–contexts of ordinary life (he was retired, a widower, and his children had left home), he was intent on ending his days in the nowhere of air travel."

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1989 • cultural emptiness • in transitin-between zonein-limboliminal spacemeaning-contextsnowherepassportplaceless placeplacelessnessplaces • The Devils Mode • threshold space • transit lounge • travelling without arriving • visa
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