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Which clippings match 'Photomontage' keyword pg.1 of 3
15 FEBRUARY 2017

Silent-era avant-garde artist-filmmakers disrupting the new realities of mass media (rather than replicating them)

"Around the time Shub started her documentary experiments, 20th century avant-garde artists likewise began using repurposed chunks of mass-produced ephemera. Picasso and Braque threw bits of newspaper into paintings; Max Ernst cut up Victorian illustrations to create proto-surrealist collages; Walter Benjamin, T. S. Eliot, and James Joyce pushed the literary practice of quotation into the realm of pastiche; Marcel Duchamp pioneered sculptural assemblage with his readymades; and photomontage blossomed in the graphic works of John Heartfield, Hannah Höch, and Alexander Rodchenko. These works rearranged reality to suit their artists' purposes but, unlike the compilation films, did not try to hide that manipulation. Whether Cubist, Dada, or Constructivist, these artists chose to disrupt the new realities of mass media rather than replicate them, savoring the illogic of dreamlike disjunctions and precipitating new ways to see all-too-common images."

(Ed Halter, 10 July 2008, Moving Image Source)

TAGS

20th centuryAlexander Rodchenkoavant-garde artistsavant-garde cinemaconstructivistcubismcut-up techniqueDadadisruptiondocumentary experiments • dreamlike disjunctions • Ed Halter • Esther Shub • experimental film • found-footage • Georges Braque • Hannah Hochinfluential artistsJames JoyceJohn Heartfield • literary practice • Marcel Duchampmass media • mass-produced ephemera • Max Ernst • new realities • Pablo Picassopastichephotomontagepioneering filmmaker • proto-surrealist collages • quotationreadymade • repurposed archival material • Russian constructivism • sculptural assemblage • Thomas Stearns Eliot • Victorian illustrations • Walter Benjamin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2013

Czech Film Posters of the 1960s

"The birth of the Czech creative film poster phenomenon in the early sixties can be credited to Karel Vaca, Karel Teissig, Richard Fremund, Vladimir Tesar, Jiri Balcar, Jaroslav Fiser, Zdenek Ziegler, Milan Grygar, Bedrich Dlouhy, Zdenek Palcr and others. In the late sixties and during the seventies they were joined by Josef Vyletal, Olga Polackova–Vyletalova, Jiri Rathousky, Alexej Jaros, Karel Machalek, Petr Pos, Jiri Salamoun, Vratislav Hlavaty, Zdenek Vlach and Antonin Sladek. In the streets, but soon also at film festival exhibitions, in art galleries and cinema premises, Czech film poster rapidly won the favor of the public for its creative imagination, poetic and lyrical atmosphere. It was characteristic by the use of collage, rollage, photomontage, retouching, striking graphic designs, wity typographic visual puns and surrealist dreamy interpretation. Mass reproductions of works of art flooded the billboards in towns and cities and changed them into sidewalk open air galleries. In the course of the 1960s, Czech film poster designers found inspiration in the informal style, applying its forms of structural abstraction and lettrism, later on in pop–art and op–art, using the then popular psychedelic forms and colors. Artists frequently employed styles inspired by the film forms, such as enlarged close–up, merging of symbolic and metaphoric visual levels and repeated details."

(Marta Sylvestrova, Museu de Arte de Macau)

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TAGS

1960s • Alexej Jaros • Andrzej Wajda • Antonin Sladek • artistic expression • Bedrich Dlouhy • collagecolour • cultural education • Czech film poster • Czech graphic design • Czech RepublicCzechoslovakiaexhibitionFederico Fellinifilm poster • film poster designer • graphic design • informal style • Ingmar Bergman • Jaroslav Fiser • Jiri Balcar • Jiri Rathousky • Jiri Salamoun • Josef Vyletal • Karel Machalek • Karel Teissig • Karel Vaca • lettrism • Luchino Visconti • Macau Museum of Art • mass reproduction • metaphoricmid-century design • Milan Grygar • Moravian Gallery in Brno • Museu de Arte de Macau • Olga Polackova-Vyletalova • op art • open air galleries • Paolo Pasolini • Petr Pos • photomontagepop art • psychedelic forms • psychedelic imagery • reproduction of illustrations • retouching • Richard Fremund • rollage • structural abstraction • surrealist inspiration • typographic poster • Vladimir Tesar • Vratislav Hlavaty • Zdenek Palcr • Zdenek Vlach • Zdenek Ziegler

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 NOVEMBER 2012

Technological advances expand the artist's expressive vocabulary

Exhibition: "Bruno Munari: My Futurist Past", Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art, 39A Canonbury Square, London, N1 2AN, From 19 September 2012 to 23 December 2012.

Bruno Munari was a "founding member of the Movimento Arte Concreta (M.A.C.) in Milan, which was established towards the end of the 1940s. This acted as a catalyst for new developments in Italian abstraction, and aspired to bring about a 'synthesis of arts' in which traditional painting would be complemented by new tools of communication, demonstrating the possibility of a convergence of art and technology, creativity and functionality. Reflecting his belief that technological advances expanded the artist's expressive vocabulary, by 1950 Munari had begun to experiment with creating works by means of projecting light through compositions made from a wide range of materials such as coloured and transparent plastic, organic elements and Polaroid filters, producing beautiful and intriguing images of vast dimensions."

(Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art, 2012)

Fig.1 Bruno Munari, Aeroplanes and Archers, 1932, mixed media, 34.8 x 24.8cms Courtesy Massimo & Sonia Cirulli Archive

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TAGS

19071998artart and technologyartistBruno Munaricolour and lightConstructivist-inspiredconvergence • creativity and functionality • exhibitionexpressive vocabularyFuturism (art movement) • Futurist past • hanging mobile • hanging objects • Italian • Italian abstraction • Italian art • Milanmobilesmodernist tradition • Movimento Arte Concreta • new tools of communication • photomontagesculpturespatial environments • synthesis of arts • technological advances • transparent plastic • uncritical attitude towards progress • use of space • useless machinesworking across disciplines • working across media

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 OCTOBER 2012

Kurt Kranz: programming of beauty

Kurt Kranz: Programming of beauty, Exhibition marking the 100th birthday of Kurt Kranz
19th November 2010 to 29th May 2011.

"Inspired by a lecture by László Moholy–Nagy, Kurt Kranz came to the Bauhaus Dessau in April 1930. In Walter Peterhans's photography class, Kranz began to experiment with photographic techniques and created some of the most striking abstract picture series to emerge from the Bauhaus. Alienated and abstracted faces and hands appear repeatedly in his dynamic picture series. These show Kranz's early affinity for film as, page for page, the abstract forms interact with one another. Kranz drafted his first concepts for abstract films at the Bauhaus, although he was first able to realise these decades later in 1972.

The exhibition to mark the artist's 100th birthday shows works from Kranz's Bauhaus years and his later work as an advertising graphic designer, and focuses on a selection of his large picture cycles. Strikingly diverse leporellos dating from the 1960s onwards take centre stage, as do the so–called 'Matrix– und Schiebebilder'."

(Bauhaus Dessau Foundation)

Fig.1 Kurt Kranz, Versinkende (Sinking one), 1931, Ingrid Kranz / Stiftung Bauhaus Dessau [http://artblart.com/2011/05/18/exhibition–kurt–kranz–programming–of–beauty–at–the–bauhaus–dessau/].

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TAGS

1931 • abstract films • abstract forms • abstract picture series • advertising graphic designer • Bauhaus DessauBauhaus Schoolcut-outdesign formalismface • Kurt Kranz • Laszlo Moholy-Nagy • leporello • photocollagephotographic experimentationphotographic image • photographic techniques • photographyphotomontage • picture cycles • picture series • sinking • visual communication • Walter Peterhans

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 OCTOBER 2011

Rodchenko's revolution: a socialist with true vision

"Painter, photographer, filmmaker, set designer, teacher, metalworker, [Alexander Rodchenko] revelled in the new freedoms thrown up by the Russian Revolution and was fiercely committed to liberating art for the masses.

Whether it was his blueprint for the ideal working man's club showcased at the Paris Exhibition of 1925, his illustrated covers for engineering manuals or his pioneering film poster for Sergei Eisenstein's classic Battleship Potemkin, Rodchenko's experimentation embodied the spirit of the early Soviet era.

But just as he thrived in the intellectual ferment of the Lenin years, like so many other artists–cum–revolutionaries of the period he was to fall foul of Stalin's increasingly paranoid and brutal regime.

Today his influence lives on, not only inspiring modern–day photographers like Martin Parr, but his designs are perhaps best known for the art school chic they afford to the covers of records by the Scottish indie band Franz Ferdinand."

(Arifa Akbar and Jonathan Brown, 2 January 2008, The Independent)

Alexander Rodchenko (1925). "Lengiz books on all subjects!"

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TAGS

19252004Alexander Rodchenkoanimationart school • artist-cum-revolutionary • bandBattleship Potemkin (1925)design formalism • engineering manuals • figures in spacefilm posterfilmmakerFranz Ferdinandhomageidealism • illustrated covers • indie band • Joseph Stalin • liberating art for the masses • Martin Parr • metalworker • modernist aestheticsmotion graphicsmusic videopainter • Paris Exhibition • photographerphotomontagepioneeringposter design • record cover • regimerevisionRussian artistRussian constructivismRussian design • Russian Revolution • Scottishsequence designSergei Eisenstein • set designer • Soviet era • Take Me Out • typographyvisual communicationvisual designvisual literacyVladimir Lenin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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