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Which clippings match 'Photograph' keyword pg.1 of 4
23 JANUARY 2013

Citizen Kane: famous film transition from a photograph to real life

"Another transition takes us to the same three men, this time reflected in the window of the Chronicle, Kane's major rival (Circulation 495,000). 'I know you're tired, Gentlemen... Kane begins, suggesting the men have come straight from the offices of the Inquirer after spending all night getting the paper out. The scene not only illustrates Kane's tireless ambition, but provides a seamless transition from the humble beginnings of the Inquirer to the day, six years later, when Kane has managed to poach the entire reporting staff captured in a photograph prominently positioned in the window of the Chronicle on that first night. The camera slowly dollies in on the reporters as Bernstein tells Kane it took the Chronicle twenty years to gather such a highly respected staff. 'Twenty years?' says Kane, 'Wells' – and suddenly, as the sentence Kane speaks spans six years, the reporters are no longer still images in a photograph but moving, breathing people – 'six years ago I looked at a picture of the world's greatest newspapermen. I felt like a kid in front of a candy store.' Kane himself then enters from the left, looking prosperous and confident..."

(Movie Movie)

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1941 • captured in a photograph • Charles Foster Kane • Citizen Kanecoming to life • Everett Sloane • film transition • group photograph • humble beginnings • Joseph Cotten • living photonewspaper • newspaper circulation • newspaper tycoon • newspapermen • Orson Wellesphotograph • poach • reflected in the window • reporters • reporting staff • respected staff • scene transition • screen-mediated virtual space • seamless transition • sequence transitionshop windowtableau • The Chronicle • The Inquirer • transition

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JULY 2012

New Zealand National Library and the Alexander Turnbull Library

"We're in Beta, and we're excited to share this new National Library website with you. Why are we so excited? For the first time you can search right across our collections in one place. It's easier to get what you're after and easier to use it."

(The Aotearoa New Zealand Department of Internal Affairs Te Tari Taiwhenua)

Fig.1 Ref: 1/2–220232–F, Portrait of girl with fan, 1968, photographed by K E Niven & Co of Wellington.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2012

Maurizio Anzeri: embroidered patterns on found vintage photographs

"Maurizio Anzeri makes his portraits by sewing directly into found vintage photographs. His embroidered patterns garnish the figures like elaborate costumes, but also suggest a psychological aura, as if revealing the person's thoughts or feelings. The antique appearance of the photographs is often at odds with the sharp lines and silky shimmer of the threads. The combined media gives the effect of a dimension where history and future converge. The image used in Round Midnight is an early 20th century 'glamour shot' that at the time would have been considered titillating for both the girl's nudity and ethnicity. Anzeri's delicately stitched veil recasts the figure with an uncomfortable modesty, overlaying a past generation's cross–cultural anxieties with an allusion to our own.

'I've been collecting old photographs for a long time. A few years ago I was doing ink drawings with them and out of curiosity I stitched into one. I work a lot with threads and hand stitching, and the link to photography was a natural progression. I put tracing paper over the photo and draw on the face until it develops. Sometimes the image comes straight away, suggested by a detail on a dress or in the background, but with the majority of them I spend a lot of time drawing. Once the drawing is done, I pierce the photo with a set of needle–like tools I invented and take the paper away; the holes are obsessively paced at the same distance to convey an idea of geometry. When I begin the stitching something else happens, drawing will never do what thread will–the light changes, and at some points you can lose the face, and at others you can still see under it.'

'There's a dynamic in what happens between the photograph, the embroidery on top, and you standing in front looking at it. I try never to completely cover a face, you can always still see the face underneath. There are no rules other than I always leave one or both eyes open. Nothing is bigger in my head than a face, it's the best landscape we can look at. It's all to do with the centre, the body. Like a costume or other identity, my work reveals something that is behind the face that suddenly becomes in front. It's like a mask–not a mask you put on, but something that grows out of you. It's what the photo is telling you and what you want to read in the photos. I get my ideas from many different sources: it could be theatre, or someone dressed up on the tube, a tribe in Papua New Guinea, or Versace. It's never one specific thing.'

'Photographs from the 40s and 50s have a totally different quality from photos we're used to today. We don't recognise them as photographs now, they really look like watercolours or drawings. The images I use are anonymous, I find them everywhere; I'm really into flea markets and car boot sales, when you enter you have no idea what you're going to encounter. In everything I see there is something I am interested in, but I try to look at them as plain canvas. Art history is very important to me, it's all been done before but it's never been done by you: if you don't look into the past there is no chance to go into the future. The surrealist movement is important to my work, but I don't become obsessed by it, it's not dictating rules. I understand history in a formal respect, and think of past artists like travelling companions–making work is like going for a walk with them. At the end of the day it's about humanity.'"

(Saatchi Gallery)

Fig.1 Maurizio Anzeri, "Rita", 2011, Embroidery on photograph, 23.5 x 17.5 cm.

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TAGS

antique • antique appearance • art history • car boot sales • costumecraft nostalgia • cross-cultural anxieties • design craftdesign revisionism • elaborate costumes • embroidered patternsembroidery • embroidery on photograph • facefigures • flea markets • foundfound imagesgeometryglamour shot • hand stitching • inner thoughts • making art with recycled materialsmask • Maurizio Anzeri • modesty • needle • nostalgia • old photographs • overlaying • photographportrait • psychological aura • Saatchi Gallerysewing • sharp lines • silky shimmer • stitchedstitching • surrealist movement • textile arts • threads • travelling companions • veiledvintage

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 MAY 2011

Spomenik: monumental geometry echoing the shapes of flowers, crystals, and macro-views of viruses or DNA

"During the 1960s and 70s, thousands of monuments commemorating the Second World War – called 'Spomeniks' – were built throughout the former Yugoslavia; striking monumental sculptures, with an angular geometry echoing the shapes of flowers, crystals, and macro–views of viruses or DNA."

(Photo–Eye via Amazon.com)

Jan Kempenaers (2010). 'Spomenik', Roma Publications

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1960s1970sabandoned places in Eastern Europeaesthetics • Antwerp • architectureBalkans • Bosnia • brutalismconcreteCroatiacrystaldeserted placesDNAdocumentary photographerEastern blocflowerfuturisticfuturistic designgeometric formsgeometry • Herzegovina • Jan Kempenaers • Kosovo • Macedonia • macro-views • melancholy beauty • Metohia • modernism • Montenegro • monument • monumental sculptures • neglect • neglected architecture • photographphotographersculpture • Serbia • SFRY • shapeSloveniaSocialist Federal Republic of YugoslaviaSoviet monuments • spomenik • symbolismtypology • victims • virusvisual representations of scientific concepts • Vojvodina • Willem Jan Neutelings • WWIIYugoslavia

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 APRIL 2011

Flickr: Anatomy of a Long Photograph

"Earlier this month flickr announced that short video clips could now be uploaded to the popular photo site. Some photo purists were skeptical, even spawning a huge 'No Video on Flickr' group. After all, the sanctity of the best still images, rich in implied meaning, could be diluted by zillions 90 second video clips of someone's keg party (and we already have other sites, like YouTube for that). Flickr said the ninety–second limit was to encourage 'long photos.' There are contemporary videographers and filmmakers who have used video or film to create sublime still images: the best long photos. And one of my favorites is Godfrey Reggio.

I will never forget the first time I saw Koyaanisqatsi, Reggio's 1983 film about contemporary 'life out of balance.' I was mesmerized by his long drawn out shots. It gave me time to study the scene and, in part, that was the point: to stop moving and consider the consequences of going through life at an increasing interstellar speed. Sometimes there was lots of activity in the frame. But there were times when he pointed his camera at a scene that, on first glance, appeared to be a photograph. It was a still image with all the implications connected with still photography: observations of a slice of frozen time and a consideration of the photographer's framing and associations within that frame.

Yet given the chance to observe closely there was movement. The characters in this 'still' were breathing and blicking and moving. When I saw his scene of Las Vegas waitresses standing still but not still, I was blown away (the vernacular I used in the early 80s when I first saw the film). To this day it is my most favorite scene of any movie I have ever watched. I literally held my breath for its entire duration wondering how long it would go on. The intensity of that shot was immense. It forced me to really look. And that has always been my goal as a photographer: to make people observe what's going on inside my images for as long as I can. That is the mark of a successful photograph. Not so easy in a culture heavy with daily sound and sight bites always vying for our attention and beckoning us to move quickly from one to another."

(Jeff Gates, 21April 2008, Life Outtacontext)

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19832008 • 90 seconds • choreography • environmental portrait • Flickr • Godfrey Reggio • intensity • Koyaanisqatsi (1982) • Las Vegas • life out of balance • living pictures • long drawn out shots • long photo • long photos • motion photograph • ninety-seconds • observationphotograph • short video clips • shotslice of frozen time • standing still • stasisstill imagestop moving and consider the consequences • study the scene • video clipwaitressYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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