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Which clippings match 'Perth' keyword pg.1 of 1
14 NOVEMBER 2014

Smooth and striated interactions between sound and digital technologies

"In the plateau '1440: The Smooth and Striated' from their book A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia, Deleuze and Guattari propose a distinction between smooth and striated space. Presenting a dialectical construction of space in which 'the two spaces in fact exist only in mixture' they argue 'smooth space is constantly being translated, transversed into a striated space, striated space is constantly being reversed, returned to a smooth space' [46]. In particular the technological model of smooth and striated space Deleuze and Guattari put forward serves as a useful construction of the interaction between sound and digital technologies. Using the example of fabric, Deleuze and Guattari explain a conception of striated space in which there are 'two kinds of parallel elements; in the simplest case there are vertical and horizontal elements, and the two intertwine, intersect perpendicularly' [47].

Performing different functions, one of these remains fixed, the other mobile, as demonstrated by one piece of thread remaining in place while another interweaves, or transverses, it or by the x–axis of time in a digital sound buffer which remains linear, straight, as its corresponding y–axis of amplitude simultaneously traces and diverges from it. It is crucial that 'a striated space of this kind is necessarily delimited, closed on at least one side', as 'fabric can be infinite in length but not in width' and though time does not constrain sound the limited headroom of digital audio means amplitude must [48]. Technological striated spaces are constructed with top and bottom, as belied by the seams of fabric or bit depth of digital sound [49]. Digital sound involves a constant process of translation in which sound moves between the smooth phenomenal space of actualized sonority and the striated space of potential that is the digital domain, while still presenting a smooth space of its own, and so is itself nothing more than a functional abstraction."

(Ben Byrne, 2009)

Byrne, B. (2009). "Digital Sound: On Technology, Infidelity and Potentiality". Totally Huge New Music Festival Conference. Edith Cowan University, Perth.

TAGS

2009 • actualised sonority • amplitude • bit depth • cloth • dialectical construction • digital audio • digital sound • digital technologiesfabricFelix Guattarifunctional abstractionGilles Deleuze • headroom • infinite length • intersect perpendicularly • intertwine • interweave • mixture • parallel elements • Perth • process of translation • recording in analogue • recording sound • smooth and striated interactions • smooth phenomenal spacesmooth space • sonority • sound • sound capture • spacestriated space • technological striated space • thread • transverse • warp • warp and woof • weaving • weft • woof • x-axis • y-axis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JUNE 2013

The NFSA Life In Australia Series

Fig.1 James Jeffrey (1966). "Life In Australia: Adelaide": 20.25 Minutes. Made by The Commonwealth Film Unit / Department of Immigration 1966. Directed by James Jeffrey. A picture of life in the South Australian capital of Adelaide in the mid 1960s, social, commercial and recreational.
Fig.2 "Life In Australia: Brisbane", Fig.3 "Guide To Canberra", Fig.4 "Darwin – Doorway To Australia", Fig.5 "Life In Australia: Hobart", Fig.6 "Life In Australia: Melbourne", Fig.7 "Life In Australia: Perth", Fig.8 "Life In Australia: Sydney".

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TAGS

1960s1966Adelaideadvertising imagesaudio and visual heritageaudiovisual archiveAustralia • Australian capital cities • Australian culture • Australian Department of Immigration • Australian ScreenBrisbaneCanberracommercial sector • Commonwealth Film Unit • cultural life • Darwin • Eric Thompson • European Australianseveryday cultureGreat Britain • Hobart • idylidyllic imageimmigrantimmigration • James Jeffrey • life in Australia • Life in Australia Series • lifestyleMelbourneNational Archives of AustraliaNational Film and Sound ArchivenewsreelNFSAPerthportrait of everyday liferecreational activitiessocial sectorSouth AustraliaSydney • ten pound pom • ten pound tourist • UK • welcoming immigrants • white Australia policy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 NOVEMBER 2005

Garden of Eden Underpining Modern Western Zoological and Botanic Gardens

"the zoological garden, like the botanical garden emerges from Assyrian hunting parks (c1350 BC) in fiction from the mythological topos of Paradise (pairidaeza) shared yet differently interpreted by both Islam and Christianity. Whilst there is evidence of collections of animals in Egyptian and Chinese gardens, it is the Garden of Eden, which underpins modern western zoological and botanic gardens. The first modern botanic garden is attributed to the Padua University (1543), although it can be traced to Aristotle's Lyceum. The inclusion of collections of animals in gardens for mere spectacle can be most illustriously ascribed to the Romans who developed aviaries and menageries but the seminal menagerie design was that of Le Vau for Louis 14th at Versailles in 1663."

(Richard Weller)

Fig.1. Jeremy @ picasaweb, 1 August 2008, 'Cassowary at Edinburgh Zoo', Scotland.

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TAGS

Assyrianaviary • botanic • cassowary • ChristiancollectionsEgypt • Garden of Eden • gardens • hunting parks • Islam • Lyceum • menagerieparadisePeoples Republic of ChinaPerthRomanspectaclezoozoologicalzoology
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