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Which clippings match 'Persuasion' keyword pg.1 of 2
15 JANUARY 2013

A theory about the power of persuasive communication

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TAGS

animated presentationauthority • concorde • consensusconsistency • gift-exchange • human naturelegitimating criterialevels of meaninglikedlikes • liking • marketing communicationpatterns of activationpersuasionpersuasive communicationpersuasively suggestivepsychological perceptionreciprocity • Robert Cialdini • scarcity • science of persuasion • scientifically proven • social obligation • Steve Martin • trust and reputationuniversal principles

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2012

Jim Jarmusch: authenticity is invaluable; originality is non-existent!

"Nothing is original. Steal from anywhere that resonates with inspiration or fuels your imagination. Devour old films, new films, music, books, paintings, photographs, poems, dreams, random conversations, architecture, bridges, street signs, trees, clouds, bodies of water, light and shadows. Select only things to steal from that speak directly to your soul. If you do this, your work (and theft) will be authentic. Authenticity is invaluable; originality is non–existent. And don't bother concealing your thievery – celebrate it if you feel like it. In any case, always remember what Jean–Luc Godard said: 'It's not where you take things from – it's where you take them to."

(Jim Jarmusch)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JANUARY 2012

Miss Representation: mainstream media is contributing to the under-representation of women in positions of power

"Like drawing back a curtain to let bright light stream in, Miss Representation (90 min; TV–14 DL) uncovers a glaring reality we live with every day but fail to see. Written and directed by Jennifer Siebel Newsom, the film exposes how mainstream media contribute to the under–representation of women in positions of power and influence in America. The film challenges the media's limited and often disparaging portrayals of women and girls, which make it difficult for women to achieve leadership positions and for the average woman to feel powerful herself.

In a society where media is the most persuasive force shaping cultural norms, the collective message that our young women and men overwhelmingly receive is that a woman's value and power lie in her youth, beauty, and sexuality, and not in her capacity as a leader. While women have made great strides in leadership over the past few decades, the United States is still 90th in the world for women in national legislatures, women hold only 3% of clout positions in mainstream media, and 65% of women and girls have disordered eating behaviors.

Stories from teenage girls and provocative interviews with politicians, journalists, entertainers, activists and academics, like Condoleezza Rice, Nancy Pelosi, Katie Couric, Rachel Maddow, Margaret Cho, Rosario Dawson and Gloria Steinem build momentum as Miss Representation accumulates startling facts and statistics that will leave the audience shaken and armed with a new perspective."

(Jennifer Siebel Newsom)

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2011adadvertisinganimated presentationbeauty politicsbody imageCondoleezza Ricecritiquecultural normsdepictions of womendesireeating behaviours • eating disorders • empowermentequalityfilmgendergirlsglobalisation of aspiration • Gloria Steinem • ideal female body • Jennifer Siebel Newsom • Katie Couric • mainstream media • Margaret Cho • masculinitymedia consumptionmedium is the message • Miss Representation (film) • Nancy Pelosi • persuasion • persuasive force • positions of influence • positions of power • power • Rachel Maddow • reflexive modernisationrepresentation of women • Rosario Dawson • sex in advertisingteenage girlsunconscious desireswomenwomen in leadership positions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 FEBRUARY 2010

Aristotle's Rhetoric: modes of persuasion

"Of the modes of persuasion furnished by the spoken word there are three kinds. The first kind depends on the personal character of the speaker [ethos]; the second on putting the audience into a certain frame of mind [pathos]; the third on the proof, or apparent proof, provided by the words of the speech itself [logos]. Persuasion is achieved by the speaker's personal character when the speech is so spoken as to make us think him credible."

(Aristotle 1356a 2,3, translation by W. Rhys Roberts)

Aristotle, Book I – Chapter 2 : Aristotle's Rhetoric (hypertextual resource compiled by Lee Honeycutt)

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12 Angry Men • argumentargumentationAristotle • Aristotles Rhetoric • audienceClassical • Classical rhetoric • communicationdramaemotion • ethos • experiencefilmHenry Fondaliteraturelogos • modes of persuasion • narrative • narrative art • pathospersuasionrhetoric • rhetorical theory • suffering • W. Rhys Roberts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2009

Product placement: personal video recorders degrading impact of conventional advertising

"Advertising has undergone many changes over the last century, moving from printed messages extolling the virtues of a product, to radio broadcasts that took the consumer's point of view into account, and on toward mass media appeals based on the television's ability to deliver a multidimensional message in a mere 30 seconds. The advent of the 'TiVo–style' personal video recorder (PVR) has degraded the impact of conventional advertising, as these PVR's allow viewers to 'zap' commercials. This has made advertisers look for other methods of putting their message before the eyes of the consumers of video media."

(Michael Bovard & Jeffrey Murray, 2005)

RIT Digital Media Library: Item 1850/5333

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2005advertisingbrand awarenessbrand recognitionbrandingCoca-Cola • Coke • commercialcommercialsconsumer behaviourconsumerism • embedded marketing • enterprisefilminnovation • marketing communications • mass media • multidimensional message • old media • personal video recorder • persuasionprintproductproduct endorsementproduct placementpromotion • PVR • radioremote control • RIT Digital Media Library • Rochester Institute of TechnologyshoppingsponsorshiptelevisionTIVOvideo mediazapper

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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