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Which clippings match 'Personality' keyword pg.1 of 2
28 DECEMBER 2013

Design genius or author as editor: filtering and synthesising?

"In 'What is an author?' [4], Michel Foucault says we are 'accustomed to presenting the author as a genius.' We see the author as the 'genial creator' of work in which he gives us, 'with infinite wealth and generosity,' an inexhaustible world of meanings. (Being 'creative' always has a positive ring, whatever is produced!) Foucault says that the author does not 'precede' the work: ideas and meanings are already there and the author's role is to 'choose,' to filter and synthesise to create output. (Foucault also emphasises 'limiting' and 'excluding'). The author's role is to limit the proliferation of meanings and present a personal view of the world. Yet the 'genius author' is represented as a continual source of invention–the opposite of his genuine function."

(Monika Parrinder, 2000, Eye Magazine)

TAGS

April Greiman • art and designart market • art star • artisanartist • artist myth • artistic solutions • Atelier Populaire • auteur theoryauthor as editorauthor as geniusavant-garde artists • being creative • blur boundaries • bohemian • Brigit Fowler • Bruce Mau • canonisation • celebritycliche • constructed idea • creative geniuscreative individuals • creative intuition • cult of the author • cult of the individual • cultural elite • Cunst Art • cutting-edge innovationsDavid Carsondesign community • Design Quarterly • design star • designer as author • editing through selectionEuropean EnlightenmentEye (magazine)fine art • Fran Cottell • genial creatorgenius • genius author • genius creator • genius mythgenius of the individual • genius status • graphic authorship • graphic design • Griselda Pollock • Hard Werken • history of ideas • ID Magazine • ingenue • innate talent • inspired visionaries • intuitioninventionJohn Maeda • John Walker • legitimate discipline • liberal artslone genius • lone pioneer • madman • maverick graphic designer • Michael Howe • Michael RockMichel Foucaultmodernismmyth of the geniusNeville Brodynon-conformist • ordinary mortal • Paul RandPentagram Designpersonapersonal expressionpersonal visionpersonalityPeter SavillePierre Bourdieupioneerromantic notion of the artist • Rozsika Parker • self-aggrandisement • self-taught • semi-divine status • solitary • spiritual insight • status • talenttaste (sociology) • Terry Jones • Tomato (design agency)tortured soul • ubermeister • visionary

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 MARCH 2012

Retaggr: sharing your portable online profile across social networks

"retaggr [was before it closed] a widget–based service that enables active web users to link all their various site–based profiles into a single, always updated, interactive business card that can be attached to virtually any type of content or interaction the user has on the web.

The interactive profile card can be linked to or embedded anywhere online, including in email signatures, blog entries, other text, or as part of online profiles on sites like LinkedIn, Facebook, twitter, and others. It lets you leave a summary of the way you define yourself on the web anywhere you want to share it."

(Retaggr, CrunchBase Profile)

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TAGS

aggregate • attached to content • business card • content aggregation • defunct • digital business card • discontinued • email signature • embeddingFacebook • interactive profile card • linkedLinkedIn • making a personal connection • online • online business card • online content • online profile • online profiles • others to see • personapersonal identitypersonal information • personal profile tool • personal website • personality • portable snapshot • profile tool • promoted to others • public profile • Retaggr • self • single business card • site-based profile • social networkingsocial networksTwitter • virtual business card • Web 2.0web presencewidget • widget-based service • yourself

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JULY 2011

NTU Multimedia student Alex Card wins prestigious Yellow Pencil in D&AD Awards for Alvy character animation

"I got a second place and a yellow pencil! I'm so pleased it's unreal.

The award ceremony was great fun, so much free wine and Pimms! And obviously the chance to meet loads of professionals.

I had an amazing opportunity to speak to the Disney guys that set the brief I did. And it turns out that I'll actually be working with them on a few projects. I really hope to show them the best of what I can do and someday soon be working with them on my own show, or anything really, I'm still in shock."

(Alex Card, 29 June 2011)

[Nottingham Trent University Multimedia BA (Honours) student Alex Card commenting on winning 2nd place in the Animation / Crafts section of the 2011 D&AD Awards.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Multimedia
11 NOVEMBER 2009

Emotional inspiration by the physiognomic characterization

"Seventeenth century painters and sculptors believed that the activities of the soul were physically impressed on the face, such that a trained viewer could read them. This was 'physiognomy' and as its name suggests, it was accepted as science at the time, much like astrology. Humanistic interests of the Renaissance revived the Aristotelian concept of correlating facial traits with personality. In addition, practitioners of physiognomic 'science' believed that the face itself distinctly and truthfully mirrored a person's soul...

Renaissance theory urged artists to portray figural and facial expression so that the spectator might experience emotional inspiration by the physiognomic characterization. In addition, handbooks of this period suggested that artists examine the emotional composition of subjects of different age, sex, rank and character. Artists such as Bernini, attempted to interpret their subjects' characters and personal dispositions to gain insight into their souls in order to represent them in art. This effort at translation. from subjective to objective reality was said to be accomplished by reading physical signs evident on the face, by becoming familiar with the sitter through dialogue and by the sitter's recollection and relation to the artist of certain states of mind."

(Wendy Walgate, 1 May 2003)

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TAGS

2003Aristotleartautonomybodycompositionemotion • emotional composition • European Renaissanceexpressionfacial expressionsfiguration • Gian Lorenzo Bernini • hog • humoralism • humorism • measurementpersonality • physiognomic characterisation • physiognomyphysiologypseudosciencepsychologyrepresentationsoul • temperament • visual depictionvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 MAY 2008

Our identity is created through our personalisation of our brains

Baroness Susan "Greenfield poses her questions, and frames her search for answers, in neuroscientific terms. 'Our identity,' she says 'is our brains'; more specifically, it lies in 'the personalised connectivity of an otherwise generic brain'. Brains are plastic and this lies at the root of her concerns. They respond to experience by changing the way their neurones are wired together – the number of connections and their strength. This is how we mature and acquire those skills that enable us to function in the world. But its plasticity also makes the brain susceptible to unwelcome and unforeseeable influences. Twenty–first–century technologies may bend our brains, and hence erode our identities, in ways previous generations could not have envisaged."

(Raymond Tallis, 11 May 2008, The Sunday Times)

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TAGS

brainchildrenconceptual mapconnectivityconvergencecultureidentityintegration • nature versus nurture • neurosciencepersonalityphysiologyplasticpsychologySusan Greenfieldsynapse • women in science

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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