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Which clippings match 'Sound Sculpture' keyword pg.1 of 1
20 JULY 2014

Mechnical sound works from commonplace industrial objects

"The sound sculptures and installations of Zimoun are graceful, mechanized works of playful poetry, their structural simplicity opens like an industrial bloom to reveal a complex and intricate series of relationships, an ongoing interplay between the 'artificial' and the 'organic'. It's an artistic research of simple and elegant systems to generate and study complex behaviors in sound and motion. Zimoun creates sound pieces from basic components, often using multiples of the same prepared mechanical elements to examine the creation and degeneration of patterns."

(Statements about Zimoun: Tim Beck http://www.zimoun.net/about.html)

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TAGS

acoustic hum • artistic research • Bern • cacophony • chaotic forces • commonplace industrial objects • commonplace objects • complex behaviours • elegant systems • functional materials • generative systems • hum • industrial objects • installation artintricacykinetic sculpturekinetic sound sculpture • lifeless matter • mechanical rhythmmechanism • mechnical sound works • minimalist art • minimalist constructions • multiples • noise • ordered system • orderly patternspatternprimitive oscillatorsquasi autonomous creaturesrepetitionrhythm oscillator • rhythmic pattern • robotic artroboticsrule systemsimple rules • sonic chaos • sound and motion • sound artsound artistsound installationsound pieces • sound production • sound sculpture • sound works • structural simplicity • swarm behaviourswarming • synthetic structures • visual chaos • Zimoun

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 MARCH 2014

Organ of Corti (2010-11) an experimental acoustical intervention

"Organ of Corti is an experimental instrument that recycles noise from the environment. It does not make any sound of its own, but rather it attempts to draw our attention to the sounds already present by framing them in a new way. Named after the organ of hearing in the inner ear, it uses the acoustic technology of sonic crystals to accentuate and attenuate frequencies within the broad range of sound present in road traffic or falling water. By recycling surplus sounds from our environment, we hope to challenge expectations of what might constitute a piece of music by adding nothing to the existing soundscape but rather offering new ways of listening to what is already there. This instrument is a device that, for us, rematerializes our experience of sound, inviting us to 'listen to ourselves listen'."

(Frances Crow and David Prior)

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TAGS

2011 • acoustic properties • acoustical experimentacousticsambient soundarchitectural conjecture • architectural interventions • architectural speculation • David Prior • design research project • experimental acoustical intervention • experimental music • experimental music composition • experimental musical instrumentexperimental soundexploratory projects • Frances Crow • interdisciplinary investigationlandscape futures • Liminal (partnership) • listening • music production • noisenoise pollutionorgan • Organ of Corti • persistence of sound • PRS New Music Award • public sound art • research and consultancy • site-specific interventionssonic artssonic environment • sound and music environments for exhibition • sound artsound artistsound designsound experimentssound performancesound sculpture • sound walk • soundscape • spatialised sound installations • spatialised soundscapes • speculative researchUKurban experienceurban landscapeurban speculationuser paths

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JUNE 2013

The Senster: pioneering cybernetic sculpture

"The Senster, commissioned by the electronics giant, Philips, for their permanent showplace, the Evoluon, in Eindhoven, was a much bigger and more ambitious piece of work than SAM. In addition to responding to people's voices, the Senster also responded to their movements, which it detected by means of radar, and was (as far as I know) the first robotic sculpture to be controlled by a computer. It was unveiled in 1970 and remained on permanent show until 1974 when it was dismantled.

Its size – it was over 15 feet (4 m) long and could reach as high into the air – made the use of aluminium castings inappropriate, so it was welded out of steel tubing, with the castings employed only in the more intricate microphone positioning mechanism. Its behaviour, controlled by a computer, was much more subtle than SAM's but still fairly simple. The microphones would locate the direction of any predominant sound and home in on it, rather like SAM but much more efficiently, and the rest of the structure would follow them in stages if the sound persisted. Sudden movements or loud noises would make it shy away. The complicated acoustics of the hall and the completely unpredictable behaviour of the public made the Senster's movements seem a lot more sophisticated than they actually were. It soon became obvious that it was that behaviour and not anything in its appearance which was responsble for the impact which the Senster undoubtedly had on the audience."

(Aleksandar Zivanovic)

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TAGS

1970acousticsart + technologyartificial intelligenceartificial life • audio activated • audio controlledautomata • computer controlled • computer historycomputer sculpturecybernetic art • cybernetic sculpture • Cybernetic Serendipitycybernetics • direction detection • Edward Ihnatowicz • Eindhoven • futuristic machineshanging mobileinteractive artinteractive toykinetic artkinetic sculpturemechanical beingmechanismmovementPhilipsradarrobotroboticrobotic sculpturerobotics • SAM (Sound Activated Mobile) • sculptureshow (spectacle)simulation • sound activated • sound sculpturespeculative design • The Senster • wonderment

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JUNE 2012

onformative a studio for generative design: unnamed soundsculpture

"The basic idea of the project is built upon the consideration of creating a moving sound sculpture from the recorded motion data of a real person. For our work we asked a Laura Keil, a berlin based dancer to interpret a musical piece – Kreukeltape by Machinenfabriek – as closely as possible with the movement of her own body. She was recorded by three depth cameras (Kinect), in which the intersection of the images was later put together to a three–dimensional volume (3d point cloud), doing so we were able to use the collected data throughout the further process.

The three–dimensional image allowed us a completely free handling of the digital camera, without limitations of the perspective. The camera also reacts to the sound and supports the physical imitation of the musical piece by the performer. She moves to a noise field, where a simple modification of the random seed can consistently create new versions of the video, each offering a different composition of the recorded performance. The multi–dimensionality of the sound sculpture is already contained in every movement of the dancer, as the camera footage allows any imaginable perspective.

Similar to painting, a single point appears to be still very abstract, but the more points are connected to each other, the more complex and concrete the image seems. The more perfect and complex the 'alternative worlds' we project and the closer together their point elements, the more tangible they become. A digital body, consisting of 22 000 points, thus seems so real that it comes to life again.

Using 3 different microsoft kinect cameras the movement of the dancer was recorded into those 3d pointclouds that were synced and exported as one large dataset as Krakatoa particle files to be loaded into 3ds max for further rendering and creation of the 3d scene including the camera movement that is controlled by the audio as well."

(Cedric Kiefer and Julia Laub, onformative a studio for generative design)

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TAGS

2012 • 3D point cloud • 3D pointclouds • 3D scene • 3ds Maxanalogue correspondenceanimationaudio controlledBerlinbodycamera footage • Cedric Kiefer • concrete image • connected points • creative practicedancedancer • Daniel Franke • depth cameras • design projectdesign studio • digital body • generative designgesture • Julia Laub • KinectKrakatoa (software) • Kreukeltape • large dataset • Laura Keil • Machinenfabriek • Microsoft Kinectmicrosoft kinect camera • modification of the random seed • motion datamovement • moving sound sculpture • multi-dimensionality • multiple perspectives • noise field • onformative • performerpersonal workperspective • physical imitation • Processing (software) • random seed • recorded motion data • recorded performance • sound sculpturespatial • spatial volume • studio for generative design • three-dimensional image • three-dimensional volume • transposing materials • unnamed soundsculpture • visual musicvisual spectaclevisualisationvolumetric particle rendering

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JULY 2011

Com­pos­ing motion: Len Lye's kinetic sculptures

"The poten­tial to be moved by move­ment was Lye's motive force – he con­ceived his sculp­tures as per­formers rather than objects. Hor­rocks sug­gests Lye might have reframed Descartes' dictum by declar­ing 'I move, there­fore I am', and para­phrased Archibald MacLeish's 'A poem should not mean / But be' with 'A film should not mean / But move'.

How much atten­tion do design­ers give to 'com­pos­ing motion' through the way their cre­ations move and /or the way people are made to move, and be moved, as they inter­act with them? Lye's prose included at least two explor­a­tions of bod­ily feel­ings and phys­ical sen­sa­tions around chairs."

(Michael Smythe, 22 March 2010, Prodesign)

Fig.1 A clip from Flip and Two Twisters a documentary about Len Lye the New Zealand born kinetic artist and filmmaker. Directed by Shirley Horrocks.

Fig.2 The kin­etic sculp­ture Uni­verse. The striker ball is sus­pen­ded above the steel loop, which has just rolled over to one side. Photo Brian East­wood. Cour­tesy Len Lye Foundation.

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TAGS

Aotearoa New Zealand • Archibald MacLeish • bod­ily feel­ings • com­pos­ing motion • design formalism • design­er • kinetic artkinetic forcekinetic sculptorkinetic sculptureLen Lye • motive force • move­ment • movementNew Zealand artistobjects • per­formers • phys­ical sen­sa­tions • physicsRene Descartes • Roger Hor­rocks • sculpture • Shirley Horrocks • sound sculpturetension

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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