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Which clippings match 'Outgrown' keyword pg.1 of 1
21 JUNE 2013

1980s chiptune easter egg rediscovered in NZ washing machines

"Twenty years of patriotism on the part of Fisher & Paykel has been revealed thanks to a viral social media video that shows its washing machines can play the national anthem. A video posted on YouTube by a woman on Tuesday has received more than 165,000 hits. The woman explains how to make the washing machine play the New Zealand national anthem.

Fisher & Paykel marketing manager Sonya Aitken said the machines, which can also play the United States and Australian anthems, were programmed to play tunes by the company's engineers for demonstration purposes. ... While the singing machines were used to draw customers' attention in stores 20 years ago, it was no longer part of sales techniques, so the feature had essentially been forgotten and then rediscovered, she said."

(Laura Walters, 21/06/2013, Fairfax NZ News)

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TAGS

1980s8-bit • Advance Australia Fair • anthem • Aotearoa New ZealandAustralia • Beverly Hills Cop (1984) • chiptunecultural significance of objectsdigital archaeologydigital artefactsdomestic material objecteaster egg • Fisher and Paykel • God Defend New Zealand • hidden feature • Home of the Brave • how to do thingsmusic making technology • national anthem • obsolescenceordinary manufactured objectoutgrownpatriotism • power surge • rediscoveredremainderremains of the past • sales technique • social media • Sonya Aitken • tune • United Statesuseless machinesviral video • washing machine • what is left of the pastwhimsical interactions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JUNE 2012

Internet Cafés: hybrids involving analogue and digital, virtual and real

"Terms like 'Internet café' or 'cybercafé' bring us right back to the 90s along with phrases like 'web page' or 'digital divide', which were invented to describe new hybrids involving analog and digital, virtual and real as well as the present and near future.

It's not that these terms have grown obsolete. It's rather that these 20th–century phenomena they once described have outgrown their terminology. They were born as metaphors, but over time turned into idioms, and their analog parts were the first [to] lose their original meanings. People who did not witness the emergence of the web do not fully understand why browser content is still called a 'page'. It's has also become unclear what public internet access facilities have in common with cafés, yet we continue calling them 'internet cafés' or 'cybercafés'."

(Olia Lialina, 2012–01–10)

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TAGS

1990s20th century20th century phenomenaanalogue and digitalarchaeology • Bart Plantenga • browser content • cafecafescyber archaeology • cybercafe • cybercafes • cyberculture • Danja Vasiliev • digital archaeologydigital culturedigital divideDragan Espenschiedemergence of the web • Florian Cramer • Goethe Institute • Goethe-Instituthistoryhome pagehybrid formidiomInternetinternet archaeology • internet cafe • internet cafes • inventionJODI (art collective) • Leslie Robbins • metaphor • near future • new cosmopolitanism • new hybrids • obsolescenceOlia Lialina • original meaning • outgrownpage metaphorphenomenaphenomenonPiet Zwart Institute • Piet Zwart Institute Willem de Kooning Academy Rotterdam University • public internet access • Renee Turner • Rotterdam • Rotterdam University • terminologythe pastvirtual and realwebweb pages • Wendelien van Oldenborgh • Willem de Kooning Academy • www

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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