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Which clippings match 'Perfection' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 OCTOBER 2013

Decoding BMW's You Know You Are Not The First

"The young woman's flawless skin is emphasizing the societal view of how perfection is what is considered beautiful and ideal. Her skin doesn't have a single blemish bruise, bump, or scar on it. Her makeup is very subtle and her cheeks have a slight rosy glow to them, giving her a very youthful appearance. The lack of jewelry is also making her look younger and more innocent and it is putting the focus solely on her bare flawless skin, this flawlessness is likely representing what one would get if they purchase one of their premium selection used BMW's, spotlessness in paint and interior.

Although BMW engages this image of innocence and flawlessness, there also appears to be a significant sexual message in this ad because the initial 'Innocent' image dissolves as you skim down the ad and see how the young woman's eye contact is directly with the camera, and it looks as if she is looking right into your eyes with a seductive expression. Her mouth also get a lot of attention as it appears to be slightly open, drawing your attention right to her full lips, 'open lips are used to suggest sexual excitement or passion'"

(Sonia Sidhu, 10 June 2012)

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TAGS

2008advertising campaignArthur Berger • atypical • blondeBMWbranded commodities • car company • constructed meaningcultural normsdepictions of womeneye contact • flawlessness • Germanglobalisation of aspirationGreece • hair colour • innocenceinterpretation • media analysis • media criticismmedia textmouth • olive skin • paradigmatic analysis • partially unclothedperfection • print advertisement • seduction • semiotic approach • semioticssex objectsexual agency • sexual excitement • signification • skin tone • suggestive narratives • syntagmatic analysis • textual analysis • used car • virginity • visual symbolism • young woman • young women

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 APRIL 2013

The debate in 1991: digital or hand-crafted type?

"Metal setting is practised today by only a handful of specialists, but it continues to provide the standards by which good typesetting is judged. Photosetting, and the computer setting which has largely displaced it, are criticised for being too perfect and lacking the character of hand–crafted type. Now, increasingly, designers are using desktop publishing systems such as the Macintosh to do their typesetting. The technology has matured considerably over the last two years and the time is ripe for a reassessment: is good typesetting possible on the Macintosh?"

(Andy Benedek, 1991)

Andy Benedek (1991). "The craft of digital type" Winter no. 2 vol. 1, Eye Magazine.

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TAGS

1991Adobe Systems • Aldus PageMaker • AppleApple LaserWriter • bit-mapped font • computer font • computer typesetting • Courier (typeface) • descender • design craftdesign for printdesktop publishingdisplay font • Emigre (magazine) • Eye (magazine) • font foundry • graphic designerhand-craftedhand-crafted typeHelvetica • hot metal typesetting • individual characterlegibility • letter-spacing • letterpress • Linotype (foundry) • MacMacintoshMacintosh computermetal type • metal typesetting • monotypeoffset printing • optical compensation • page description language • page layoutperfection • photosetting • PostScript • PostScript typeface • technology affordances • Times (typeface) • too perfect • traditional practicestypefacetypesettingtypography • Unternehmensberatung Rubow Weber • URW

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JUNE 2004

On Exactitude in Science: a map the size of the territory it represents

"On Exactitude in Science . . . In that Empire, the Art of Cartography attained such Perfection that the map of a single Province occupied the entirety of a City, and the map of the Empire, the entirety of a Province. In time, those Unconscionable Maps no longer satisfied, and the Cartographers Guilds struck a Map of the Empire whose size was that of the Empire, and which coincided point for point with it. The following Generations, who were not so fond of the Study of Cartography as their Forebears had been, saw that that vast Map was Useless, and not without some Pitilessness was it, that they delivered it up to the Inclemencies of Sun and Winters. In the Deserts of the West, still today, there are Tattered Ruins of that Map, inhabited by Animals and Beggars; in all the Land there is no other Relic of the Disciplines of Geography.

Suarez Miranda,Viajes de varones prudentes, Libro IV,Cap. XLV, Lerida, 1658"
(Jorge Luis Borges, 1999)

Jorge Luis Borges, Collected Fictions, Translated by Andrew Hurley Copyright Penguin 1999

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TAGS

19461:12D representationsabsurditycartographycity • Del rigor en la ciencia (story) • empirefictional mapgeographyJorge Luis BorgesmapOn Exactitude in Science (1946)perfection • province • territory
20 JANUARY 2004

Utopic Representations of an Orderly Society

"Freemasonry during this period [early eighteenth century] was tolerant, enlightened, generally secular yet morally aware, and concerned with issues to do with scientific discovery. This science was used to legitimate a vision of social order as based in natural order. Freemasonry provided not only a vehicle for the scientists to lecture and socialize; it also offered the means through which these economic and political interests might find common support. It played a part in the civilizing of civil society. Newtonian science not only provided legitimacy through the symbolism of masonry for a higher, morally regulated, perfectible society, but also the means through which perfection might be achieved. The lodges were utopic representations of an orderly society by which self–interested bourgeois individuals might be shaped into moral subjects not only through their veneration of the symbolic order found in both nature and architecture, and their acceptance of rank and hierarchy, but also through their own freedom as moral subject sand as part of a group that perceived itself as a moral elect. Through such means the unhewn stranger could be shaped into a trustworthy brother. Such a process could not but help promote the development of the shared political and economic interests that we have all come to associate with freemasonry in more recent times."

(Kevin Hetherington, 1997, p.88)

Hetherington, K. (1997). "The Badlands Of Modernity: Heterotopia And Social Ordering". London: Routledge.

31 DECEMBER 2003

Tends To Perfection: Nature

"things themselves tend to perfection [...] Nature, according to Aristotle, tends to perfection, which does not mean that it always attains it. The body tends to health, but it can become ill; men in the aggregate tend to the perfect State, but wars can occur. Thus nature has certain ends in view, states of perfection toward which it tends but sometimes nature fails. From this follows the purpose of. art and science: by "re–creating the creative principle" of things, they correct nature where it has failed."
(Augusto Boal)

Boal, Augusto. 1993 Theatre of the Oppressed, London, UK: Pluto Press.

TAGS

AristotleAugusto BoalClassicalperfection • principle • state
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