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Which clippings match 'Analogue And Digital' keyword pg.1 of 1
06 NOVEMBER 2013

Kunsthochschule für Medien Köln: Department of Hybrid Space

"A new interdisciplinary field of design, researching the transformations of architectural, urban/regional space of the emerging 'information age', explores the dynamic interaction of architecture/urbanism and the space of mass media and communication networks. It develops scenarios for the interplay of public urban and public media space. The products of these alliances of urban/regional and media networks, of architectural and media space, are bastards: ambivalent spaces that are at the same time analog and digital, tactile and abstract, material and immaterial, expanding hyper–sensuality in the time– and placelessness of media flows. These hybrid spatial morphs act simultaneously in urban (local) and media (global) space and mediate between them, unfolding the undefined space between the local and the global, occupying the vacuum between local place and global space. Within the inversions of identity (communication), within the fluid ever–changing densities in the knitted networks, fused analogue/digital cultures are idensified."

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Academy of Media Arts Cologne • ambivalent spaces • analogue and digital • analogue and digital cultures • architectural conjecturearchitectural space • architectural transformations • architecturebastard • changing densities • Colognecommunication networksdesign coursedesign field • Elizabeth Sikiaridi • embodied interactionsflows • Frans Vogelaar • global space • glocalglocalizationhybrid spaces • hybrid spatial morphs • hyper-sensualityidentityidentity constructionimmaterialinformation ageinformation flows • interdisciplinary design • interdisciplinary field • knitted networks • Kunsthochschule fur Medien Koln • local place • local space • mass mediamaterialitymedia arts • media flows • media networksmedia spaceplacelessnesspublic space • public urban space • regional space • tactile experience • undefined space • urban spaceurbanism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 AUGUST 2013

Print is Flat, Code is Deep: The Importance of Media-Specific Analysis

"Many critics see the electronic age as heralding the end of books. I think this view is mistaken. Books are far too robust, reliable, long–lived, and versatile to be rendered obsolete by digital media. Rather, digital media have given us an opportunity we have not had for the last several hundred years: the chance to see print with new eyes and, with that chance, the possibility of understanding how deeply literary theory and criticism have been imbued with assumptions specific to print. As we continue to work toward critical practices and theories appropriate for electronic literature, we may come to renewed appreciation for the specificity of print. In the tangled web of medial ecology, change anywhere in the system stimulates change everywhere in the system. Books are not going the way of the dinosaur but the way of the human, changing as we change, mutating and evolving in ways that will continue, as a book lover said long ago, to teach and delight."

(Katherine Hayles, 2004)

Katherine Hayles (2004). "Print is Flat, Code is Deep: The Importance of Media–Specific Analysis" Poetics Today, Volume 25, Number 1, Spring 2004, pp. 67–90.

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2004analogue and digital • analogue resemblance • bookscodecritical enquirycritical practices • cyborg reading practices • digital coding • digital media • distributed cognitive environments • electronic age • electronic hypertext • electronic literature • embodied entities • emergent property • end of booksend of printevolving form • instantiation • interpretation of signsKatherine Haylesliterary criticismliterary theorymaterialitymedia ecologiesmedia specificity • media-specific analysis • medial ecology • medium specificitymutabilitynatural languageobsolete medium • physical characteristics • physical specificity • recombination • renewed appreciation • signification • signifying strategies • somnolence • spaces to navigate • specificity of printtextstransformable • versatile medium • women in cultural theory

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JUNE 2012

Internet Cafés: hybrids involving analogue and digital, virtual and real

"Terms like 'Internet café' or 'cybercafé' bring us right back to the 90s along with phrases like 'web page' or 'digital divide', which were invented to describe new hybrids involving analog and digital, virtual and real as well as the present and near future.

It's not that these terms have grown obsolete. It's rather that these 20th–century phenomena they once described have outgrown their terminology. They were born as metaphors, but over time turned into idioms, and their analog parts were the first [to] lose their original meanings. People who did not witness the emergence of the web do not fully understand why browser content is still called a 'page'. It's has also become unclear what public internet access facilities have in common with cafés, yet we continue calling them 'internet cafés' or 'cybercafés'."

(Olia Lialina, 2012–01–10)

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1990s20th century20th century phenomenaanalogue and digitalarchaeology • Bart Plantenga • browser content • cafecafescyber archaeology • cybercafe • cybercafes • cyberculture • Danja Vasiliev • digital archaeologydigital culturedigital divideDragan Espenschiedemergence of the web • Florian Cramer • Goethe Institute • Goethe-Instituthistoryhome pagehybrid formidiomInternetinternet archaeology • internet cafe • internet cafes • inventionJODI (art collective) • Leslie Robbins • metaphor • near future • new cosmopolitanism • new hybrids • obsolescenceOlia Lialina • original meaning • outgrownpage metaphorphenomenaphenomenonPiet Zwart Institute • Piet Zwart Institute Willem de Kooning Academy Rotterdam University • public internet access • Renee Turner • Rotterdam • Rotterdam University • terminologythe pastvirtual and realwebweb pages • Wendelien van Oldenborgh • Willem de Kooning Academy • www

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 NOVEMBER 2004

Church On 5th Avenue: dream-like quality through physical blurring

"Church on 5th Avenue is three from Campbell's Ambiguous Icon series. Video images taken from New York street scenes soon after September 11, take on new life on LED display panels. A sheet of plexiglas in front of each panel alters our perception of the image. In Fifth Avenue Cutaway #2 the sheet is close to the panel surface, allowing the viewer to perceive each LED. Because the plexiglas is further from the LED surface in Fifth Avenue Cutaway #3, the image is blurred, taking on a dream–like quality. In Church on Fifth Avenue the sheet of diffusing plexiglas is angled in front of the grid, so that as the pedestrians move from left to right, their form becomes increasingly indistinct. Using largely redundant technology in a new way, Campbell thus creates a metaphorical transition from the digital image made from pixels to the filmic analogue image."

(Jim Campbell)

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2001analogue and digitalblurblurry • Church on 5th Avenue • digital displaysdigital screensinstallation • Jim Campbell • LEDlow-definition screenplexiglasredSeptember 11
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