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Which clippings match 'Peer-to-peer' keyword pg.1 of 2
01 SEPTEMBER 2011

Aotearoa New Zealand illegal online file-sharing laws pass

"(Apr. 18, 2011) On April 14, 2011, the New Zealand parliament passed the Copyright (Infringing File Sharing) Amendment Bill. (Press Release, Hon. Simon Power, New Regime for Section 92a Copyright Infringements (Apr. 14, 2011) [Press Release 1]; see also Copyright (Infringing File Sharing) Amendment Bill, New Zealand Legislation website (last visited Apr. 14, 2011).)

The bill establishes a new three–notice regime that seeks to deter illegal online file–sharing, replacing the previous approach that was set out by section 92A of the Copyright Act 1994. Section 92A, which was enacted in 2008 but never brought into force, would have required internet service providers (ISPs) to have, and reasonably implement, a policy for terminating the accounts of customers who repeatedly downloaded pirated material. (Press Release, Hon. Simon Power, Government to Amend Section 92A (Mar. 23, 2009); Press Release, Hon. Simon Power, Section 92A Bill Introduced to Parliament Today (Feb. 23, 2010); see also Press Release, Hon. Judith Tizard, Copyright (New Technologies) Amendment Comes into Force (Oct. 3, 2008).) ...

This regime will come into force from September 1, 2011, although it will not apply to cellular mobile networks until October 2013. (Press Release 1, supra.)"

(Kelly Buchanan, Global Legal Monitor, USA Law Library of Congress)

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TAGS

199420082011Aotearoa New Zealandcellular mobile networkscopyrightCopyright Act 1994copyright infringement • Copyright Tribunal • creative industriesdata regulationsdownloadingdownloading lawethicsfile sharing • illegal online file-sharing • infringing file sharingintellectual property • international legal news • Internet file sharing law • Internet Piracy Bill • internet service providerISP • Judith Tizard • legallegislationLibrary of Congresslicensemonitoringmusic downloadingNational (political party)new technologiesoffenceP2Ppeer-to-peerpiracypirated materialregulationremixsection 92ashare • Simon Power

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 AUGUST 2009

KeyHoleTV: P2P broadcast technology

"With super–low load P2P communication, "KeyHoleTV" enables you to watch TV programmes of any country via Internet. The software was developed under the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications' programme for "Development of Next Generation P2P Content Distribution System" and it is compliant to Windows XP/Vista, Windows Mobile, Mac OS and Linux."
(gigazine.net, 08 April 2009)

[The technology includes clients for both viewing and broadcasting video content over the Internet.]

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TAGS

authorshipbroadcastbroadcastingconvergencedevicedigital mediadistributionJapan • KeyHoleTV • KeyHoleVideo • Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications • old mediaP2Pparticipationpeer-to-peerscriptibletechnologytelevisionuser-generated

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 DECEMBER 2008

Deptford.tv: a practice research project exploring the possibilities of online media and collaborative filmmaking

"Adnan Hadzi started off by introducing his Deptford TV project (deptford.tv) – a practice research project exploring the possibilities of online media and collaborative filmmaking. The research is a collaboration between Goldsmith's College, Deckspace Media Lab, Bitnick Media Collective, Boundless Project and Liquid Culture Initiative. Hadzi's presentation introduced two key aims of his research: one is to archive and create a database of footage documenting the regeneration process of Deptford, South East London, working closely with the local community; the other is to then make this footage available to artists, filmmakers and people living in Deptford in order that they can re–edit and share the material online. Hadzi's research explores how new media can revolutionise the relationship between filmmaker, subject and audience, enabling the subjects of the footage to also be authors of edited 'timelines' which in turn can be commented upon or changed by the viewers. This was illustrated by a clip from the project Deptford Now and Then by Gordon Cooper, which intercuts between archive footage of the Deptford power station, images of the community film archive and the archive projectionist's reflexive pieces to camera. In this way, Hadzi's research challenges our concept of traditional 'broadcasting' and explores the opportunities of peer–to–peer and user–generated content for community film, research questions which clearly could not be explored through traditional publication alone."
(Adnan Hadzi)

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TAGS

802.11audiovisualboundless.coop wireless network • broadcast localism • broadcasting • collaborative filmmaking • collaborative media • collaborative media production • community regenerationDeptford • Deptford TV • digital mediaonline mediaP2Pparticipationpeer-to-peerpractice-based research • reflexive • reflexivityresearchsocial changetheory buildingtransformationUKuser-generated

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 OCTOBER 2008

How Bittorent Killed Television

"This talk & presentation at the Australian Film Television and Radio School is a good exploration about how the hyperdistribution techniques of BitTorrent and other technologies have shifted control away from broadcasters and television programme distributors toward the audience. More than just a critique, I provide the assembled TV executives (quite a few in that crowd) with some new techniques to keep up with their audiences in the 21st century."
(Mark D. Pesce, Australian Film Television and Radio School, May 2005)

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TAGS

21st centuryAFTRSBitTorrentbroadcastdigital cultureeconomic modelfile sharing • hyperdistribution • Mark Pescenetworkonline lecturespeer-to-peerpiracy • swarm • television

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JUNE 2005

Impeding Innovation Through Copyright Liability Decision

Jason Schultz (Electronic Frontier Foundation)
[The June 27, 2005 American] Supreme Court issued a ruling that could impede makers of all kinds of technologies with expensive lawsuits. The long–awaited decision in MGM v. Grokster states that P2P software manufacturers can be held liable for the infringing activities of people who use their software. This decision relies on a new theory of copyright liability that measures whether manufacturers created their wares with the "intent" of inducing consumers to infringe. It means that inventors and entrepreneurs will not only bear the costs of bringing new products to market, but also the costs of lawsuits if consumers start using their products for illegal purposes.

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TAGS

Electronic Frontier Foundation • Grokster • infringement • June 27 • liabilityMGMP2Ppeer-to-peer • ruling • Schultz • software manufacturer • StreamCast • Supreme Court: America
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