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Which clippings match 'Career Path' keyword pg.1 of 1
18 MARCH 2013

Younger Workers Need a Career Narrative

"In recent years, much has been written about the importance of career narratives for mid–career and senior professionals, particularly those making a career transition. But, we'd argue, they're even more important for younger professionals who don't yet have a multipage CV or a high–powered headhunter in their corner. What, then, makes for an effective narrative?

First, it should be easy to remember and retell. The whole point is to give your colleagues a narrative that quickly comes to mind whenever they're asked about you, preventing them from making assumptions and drawing conclusions on their own. Two or four sentences, maximum.

Second, it should meaningfully link your past successes to your near and long–term development needs and suggest the kinds of assignments that would help to achieve those objectives. Those goals might certainly be developmental (to test a particular skill; gain experience with a certain tool or methodology; explore a specific industry). But they can also be more personal (limit travel to spend time with family, for instance).Think of it as a 'sound–bite resume' – on hearing it, senior professionals should have two reactions. First, they should be interested in working with you. Second, they should know if it makes sense for you to work with them.

Third, your narrative needs to hang together with the right combination of honesty, humility, and personal flavor. Doing so creates an authentic and compelling career narrative. Narratives that just articulate a string of successes are not credible and are not likely to be repeated. Similarly, boilerplate chronicles without any personal flair rarely get traction."

(Heidi K. Gardner and Adam Zalisk, 15 February 2013, Harvard Business Review)

TAGS

careercareer developmentcareer journeycareer narrativecareer pathcareer planningcareer progressioncareer story • career transition • curriculum vitae • CV • Harvard Business Reviewhuman resourcesleadershiplearning journeynarrative accountorganisational behaviourorganisational capabilities • organisational development • organisational productivitypersonal knowledge mappingpersonal satisfactionprofessional developmentprofessional skillsresume • senior professionals • sound-bite resume • strategysuccesstailored curriculumtailoring curriculumworkplace • younger professionals

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JUNE 2012

College for Creative Studies: 1 in 5 Teenagers Will Experiment With Art

"College for Creative Studies's (CCS's) 'PSA' campaign, launched in September, has recently gone viral with more than 1,000,000 hits and shares on various social networking and blogging sites including Facebook and Twitter. Created by advertising agency, Team Detroit (Dearborn, MI), the campaign loosely parodies popular anti–drug campaigns from the 1980s and 90s. This light–hearted approach is intended to help recruit potential students to CCS...

'We understand that applying to an art and design College requires a serious commitment on the part of students and families. There is a competitive entry process and we offer students a rigorous education while providing graduates with a solid career trajectory,' says CCS President Richard L. Rogers. 'With this campaign we are able to convey a serious message in an amusing manner. We are grateful to Team Detroit for spearheading this great effort with their stellar pro–bono work. It is particularly impactful that CCS alumni Vic Quattrin, Brandi Keeler and Michael Burdick helped to develop the campaign.'

The entire campaign is supported by a fully–integrated marketing effort including print, broadcast, outdoor, cinema and online advertisements with the tagline, 'Talk to your kids about art school: a message from the College for Creative Studies.' It went viral due to a post from the Tulsa Oklahoma based Philbrook Museum of Art's Facebook page.

'As an institution that strongly embraces social media and its growing potential, we are always looking for compelling content to share with our online communities. This campaign certainly struck a chord with us on a humorous level, but it is the underlying sentiment and advocacy for the arts as a viable career path that made this campaign special. It was such a pleasure to play a part in this viral phenomenon,' says Online Communities Manager Jeff Martin, Philbrook Museum of Art."

(College for Creative Studies, Detroit)

[The 'PSA' campaign exploits the visual vernacular of public information campaigns such as the Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.)]

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TAGS

1980s1990s2011ad campaignadvertising campaignadvocacy for the arts • anti-drug campaign • anti-drugs • art and designart and design careersart and design collegeart and design schoolart studentsarts advocacyBFA • broadcast campaign • career path • career trajectory • CCS • cinema campaign • College for Creative Studies • compelling content to share • DARE • Detroit • Drug Abuse Resistance Education • fully-integrated marketing • gone viralhumourintertextuality • lighthearted • marketing campaignMFA • online advertisements • online campaign • outdoor campaign • parody • Philbrook Museum of Art • print campaign • pro bono • PSApublic informationpublic service announcementrecruitment • students and families • talk to your kids about art schoolTeam Detroit • Tulsa Oklahoma • vernacular • viable career path • viral marketingvisual vernacularwent viral

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 SEPTEMBER 2011

Career Narratives: stories that connect your past to your present

"A career narrative is basically a story about a career. It is a story that connects the protagonist's (i.e., the client's) past to the present in the sense that it conveys how the protagonist came to be what he or she is presently. This retrospective aspect of the narrative is supplemented with the career story's progressive aspect, in which the narrative puts into words the future that the protagonist is approaching. A career story is therefore both an account of how the protagonist came to be what he or she presently is, and furthermore, what future is expected for the protagonist to enact based on his or her particular past and present being."

(Torben K. Christensen; Joseph A. Johnston, pg.149)

2). Torben K. Christensen; Joseph A. Johnston (2003). "Incorporating the Narrative in Career Planning", Journal of Career Development; Spring 2003; 29, 3; ABI/INFORM Global.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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