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Which clippings match 'Sales' keyword pg.1 of 1
20 JANUARY 2013

HMV's woes do not signal the end for record shops

"But, for once, the smaller independent retailers could be among the winners. Despite HMV's inability to make high street music retailing pay, many independent record shops are already reporting higher demand and sales, due partly to a backlash against Amazon's tax set–up and the difficulty of stumbling across unexpected gems online.

Stephen Godfroy, co–owner of Rough Trade, a chain of three London shops including a 500 sq m (5,000 sq ft) warehouse off Brick Lane, east London, said business is 'the best it's ever been' in the company's 36–year history. He said Rough Trade sales in the latest quarter were up 8% on the previous year and the company is in the process of launching a new online store and an outpost in Brooklyn, New York.

'UK music is in rude health, despite the woes of the last outdated chain of entertainment retailer,' he said. 'The collapse of HMV is sad but ultimately a necessary process of renewal that will result in a significantly brighter future for UK music consumers.'"

(Rupert Neate and Martha Thomas, 16 January 2013, Guardian News and Media Limited)

Fig.1 The Silent League [http://www.silentleague.com/] play in the intimate performance space at the back of Rough Trade [http://irocklondon.blogspot.co.uk/2010/07/vinyl–paradise–with–occasional–live.html].

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TAGS

Amazon.com • backlash • Brick LaneBrooklynchain storeeast London • entertainment retailer • high street music retailer • high street retailerHMV • independent record shops • independent retailersindependent shopsLondon • music consumer • music sales • New York • outdated chain • process of renewal • renewretailingRough Trade • rude health • salessimilitudeStephen Godfroystumbling acrosstax • The Silent League • UK • UK music • unexpected gems

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 JUNE 2012

SEQ Legal: website law

"Web developers and webmasters need to ensure that their sites comply with the varied and ever–changing requirements of English law. Although it is relatively simple to create and publish a website, the legal consequences of those simple acts can be complex – and potentially expensive. A myriad of different UK and EU laws intrude upon website design, domain name choice, website content, sales from websites, and indeed every other aspect of ecommerce and online activity."

(SEQ Legal LLP.)

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TAGS

binding agreementcontractdesign businessdesign contract • domain name choice • e-commerce • ecommerce • English law • EU • EU law • intellectual propertylaw • legal consequences • legal services • online activity • professional practiceproject workrequirementssales • SEQ Legal • terms and conditionsUK • UK law • Web developers • webmasters • website • website content • website design • website law • websites

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JUNE 2009

Top 40 faces new digital shake-up

"There was currently no sign of a slow–down in single sales, Mr Talbot said. Some 115 million singles were sold last year – compared with a low point of 30 million in 2003. This year's total is expected to be 160 million."

(Ian Youngs, 21 June 2009, BBC News)

UK SINGLES REVIVAL

2003 – 30,888,000 singles sold
2004 – 32,266,000
2005 – 47,882,000
2006 – 66,925,000
2007 – 86,562,000
2008 – 115,139,000

(Source: Official Charts Company)

[It's interesting that all the noise from major record companies about the death of the music industry seems at odds with the figures. I think their problem isn't piracy but loss of market share/market dominance]

CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
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