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Which clippings match 'Traditional Techniques' keyword pg.1 of 3
29 DECEMBER 2013

Some have always distrusted new things...

"Skepticism is not new to education. Emerging technologies are often viewed with fear and resistance. Just look at some of the history surrounding educational change.

'Students today can't prepare bark to calculate their problems. They depend upon their slates, which are more expensive. What will they do when the slate is dropped and it breaks? They will be unable to write.'–Teachers Conference, 1703

'Students today depend upon paper too much. They don't know how to write on a slate without getting chalk dust all over themselves. They can't clean a slate properly. What will they do when they run out of paper?'–Teachers Association, 1815

'Students today depend upon store–bought ink. They don't know how to make their own. When they run out of ink, they will be unable to write words or cipher until the next trip to the settlement. This is a sad commentary on modern times.'–Rural American Teacher, 1929

'Ballpoint pens will be the ruin of education in our country. Students use these devices and then throw them away! The American virtues of thrift and frugality are being discarded. Business and banks will never allow such expensive luxuries.'–Federated Teacher, 1959"

(Michael Bloom, Professional Associates for Consultation and Training)

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TAGS

1703 • 1815 • 19291959 • authentic practices • authenticity of thingsballpoint pen • bark • chalkconservative attitudesconstantly evolving technological platformcultural understanding of technologydistruste-learning • educational change • emerging technologiesfear of technologyinstrumental conception of technologylearning and teachinglooking backwards to the futureluddite • meaningful learning experiences • mistrust • naive perspectives • no batteries requiredorthodoxypaperparadigm shiftpen and inkpen and paper • resistance to change • resistant behaviourritualskeptical perspective • skepticism • slatestudent learning • teacher professionalism • teachingtechnical skilltechnological advancementstechnology and its impacttechnology as neutraltraditional processtraditional techniques • try out new ideas • unhealthy suspicion • use of technology

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 APRIL 2013

Colourful cut-out card illustrations by Eiko Ojala

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 FEBRUARY 2013

Let's not let new technology change our profession or our industry...

"This newscast from KRON in San Francisco in 1981 has been making the rounds recently. It's labeled 'primitive Internet report,' but what it presents is actually one example of the many pre–Internet efforts that the newspaper industry made to try to plan for an online future – and stake out its own turf in that forthcoming world. ...

In the video, you can hear [Dave] Cole say, of the 'Electronic Examiner' he was demonstrating, 'We're not in it to make money.' At the end, the announcer points out that an entire edition of the paper takes two hours to download, at a $5/hour cost – making this 'telepaper' little competition for the paper edition. 'For the moment at least,' the reporter declares, over the image of a sidewalk news vendor hawking the afternoon edition, 'this fellow isn't worried about being out of a job.'

Though the piece does say that 'Engineers now predict the day will come when we get all our newspapers and magazines by home computer,' its underlying message is – Don't worry. This crazy computer stuff isn't going to change anything much for now. And indeed it took 10 years for any sort of online service to become even remotely popular. Almost 30 years later, newspapers are still in business; some are even still sold by guys on sidewalks. It has taken this long for the technology to transform the newspaper biz in a big way. ...

But even as the downloads sped up and the connect–time costs dropped, the industry held onto that approach, instead of coming to grips with the fundamentally different dynamics of a new communications medium. What had made sense in the early days over time became a crippling set of blinders. The spirit of experimentation that the Examiner set out with in 1981 dried up, replaced by an industry–wide allergy to fundamental change.

'Let's use the new technology,' editors and executives would say, 'but let's not let the technology change our profession or our industry.' They largely succeeded in resisting change. Now it's catching up with them."

(Scott Rosenberg, 29 January 2009)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 OCTOBER 2012

Te Wei's The Buffalo Boy and his Flute

"A young boy who likes to play the flute dreams that he has lost his water buffalo."

(IMDb)

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TAGS

19632D animationanimationbamboodreamdream sequencedreamlike quality • flute • hand-drawnink • Jiajun Qian • Mu di • musical instrumentPeoples Republic of Chinariver • shan shui • Te Wei • The Buffalo Boy and his Flute • The Cowboys Flute • The Cowherds Flute • traditional techniquesvisual designwater and ink • water buffalo • water/ink animationwatercolourwatercolour paintingyoung boy

CONTRIBUTOR

Guannan (cassie) Du
25 OCTOBER 2012

Te Wei's Feelings of Mountains and Waters

"Shan shui qing ('Feelings of Mountains and Waters') finished production in 1988. This water/ink animation was Te Wei's [特伟] fourth and final major production, and is in many ways fittingly so. 'Feelings of Mountains and Waters' is a masterpiece. The film runs slightly under twenty minutes, moving the viewer through an emotional journey cleanly articulated by deep and vivid imagery, wrought with incredible artistic purity.

The film's subject is a young girl, whom ferrying an aging man across a river, generously nurses him to better health after witnessing him collapse on the shoreline. In 'Feelings of Mountains and Waters,' Te Wei uses earthy watercolors and craggy puffs of ink to maneuver hillsides, paths, valleys, and waterfalls. He uses the high–values where the ink ends and the paper begins not as an artifact of the landscape, but as the landscape itself. The watercolor paintings move and flourish, the water and ink are the animation; and the rosy–cheeked girl, through muted conversation with the humble old man, learns to play a plucked, string instrument under the quiet and almost sentient backdrop of the mountainous milieu.

Te Wei served as general director for 'Feelings of Mountains and Waters,' and retired after its completion, at the time well into his seventies. The film deservedly earned multiple awards, including high honors from international film festivals in Montreal and Shanghai. In 1995, the global professional animation community ASIFA honored Te Wei with a Lifetime Achievement Award."

(Aaron H. Bynum, 12th February 2010, p.3, Animation Insider)

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TAGS

19882D animation • aging man • ancient instrument • animationblack and whitecreative practicecultural heritage • earthy watercolours • emotional journey • Feelings of Mountains and Waters • female protagonistfish • folk narrative • folk story • folk tale • folkloregirlhand-drawninklandscapemark makingmonkeymonotonemusical instrumentmusiciannational cultural identities • national cultural identity • national heritageold manpaintingpaperPeoples Republic of Chinapioneering animatorriver • Shan shui qing • Shanghai Animation Studios • Shanghai Film Studios • Te Wei • traditional painting • traditional techniquesvisual designvivid imagerywater and inkwater/ink animationwatercolour painting • whistle • young girl • zheng (instrument)

CONTRIBUTOR

Guannan (cassie) Du
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