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Which clippings match 'Application Of Design' keyword pg.1 of 1
02 MARCH 2013

WW1 Razzle Dazzle ship camouflage

"Most camouflage is based on the idea of concealment and blending in with its surroundings. However another school of thought has argued for making the item in question appear to be a mashup of unrelated components. Naval camoufleurs found this theory particularly appealing. Blending didn't work because ships operated in two different and constantly changing color environments – sea and sky. Any camo that concealed in one environment was usually spectacularly conspicuous in others.

Norman Wilkinson, a British naval officer and painter, suggested a scheme that came to be known as Dazzle or Razzle Dazzle painting. Wilkinson believed that breaking up a ship's silhouette with brightly contrasting geometric designs would make it harder for U–boat captains to determine the ship's course."

(FoundNYC Inc, 4 April 2009)

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TAGS

1917angular shapesappearanceapplication of design • battleship • blend in • blending • blending in • blocks of colourbreaking up • bulk • camo • camouflage • camouflage pattern • colourcolour schemeconcealment • conspicuous • constantly changing • dazzle • dazzle painting • dazzle ship painting • dead-end technology • disruption pattern • disruptive colouration • disruptive patterndistortiongeometric designsinterruptioninvisibilitymilitary • naval camouflage • naval camoufleurs • navy • Norman Wilkinson • optical illusionoutlinepainting • Razzle Dazzle • sea • seascape • shapesshipsilhouetteskyspatial ordersurroundings • U-boat • unrelated components • vessel • visual abstractionvisual patternvorticismWorld War IWW1zig-zag

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 JUNE 2012

Design + Culture: A Return to Fundamentalism?

"whilst the application of design is multiplying exponentially, it is also loosing its validity as an authentic cultural icon. It has become synonymous with cloning the face of global culture itself, more often representing the uniformity of mass globalisation, rather than reflecting the facets of cultural difference and diversity.

The cultural attributes of difference and diversity have been fundamentally weakened, and like face that has undergone cosmetic surgery, the result is a facsimile vaguely familiar but disturbingly without a true sense of identity. It is everyone's and no one's, and belongs in no single place more than another. ...

Design has become omnipresent within Culture, as it has been adopted as a convenient badge to add value and market commodity, and to signify identity. Following Designer era of 1980's, the added value of design was replaced by design as cultural value, embodied in leading Brands of the 1990's. ...

in the 21st Century the task of capturing Culture has become more and more difficult in terms of expressing culture through the medium of design. Design increasingly struggles for a clear sense of definition, and one is left asking, what can Culture really mean today, if it is no longer tied to consumer lifestyle? We remain in a post–contemporary state where we require a redefinition of meaning, value and identity. ...

The uncertainty of a designed fusion Culture has replaced the certainty of traditional cultural monoculture. Which in turn has been diluted by an obsession with 'cultural materialism'. What remains of the original cultural sources are being plundered in order to restock our lack of creative DNA. The net result is an erosion of the remaining authentic sources, but also the creation of a 'cultural time lag' which has been generated by a convergence of trans–cultural fusions, hybridisation, and of recurrent cultural cross referencing."

(David Carlson on 21 Mar 21 2011, David Report)

Fig.1 paper sculptures made by Jennifer Collier [http://jennifercollier.co.uk/].

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1980199021st centuryadded valueadded value through designaestheticisationapplication of designart and design doctrinearts and craftsauthentic cultural iconauthentic materials • authentic sources • authenticityconsumer brandsconsumer lifestyles • cosmetic surgery • craftcraft nostalgiacreative fundamentalismcreativitycultural cross referencingcultural identitycultural materialismcultural monoculturedecorationderivativedesign • design as cultural value • design craftdesign essentialismdesign fundamentalismdesign innovationdesign revisionism • difference and diversity • expressing culture • global culture • globalisationhomogenizationhybridisationlegitimacymarket commodity • mass globalisation • monoculturenostalgia • original cultural sources • post-contemporary • post-traditional • redefinition of meaning • sewn typography • traditional cultural monoculture • trans-cultural fusions • trendsuniformityvalidityvisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JANUARY 2010

In the digital world, there is suffusion: anything can be duplicated almost endlessly at negligible cost

"Take the idea of scarcity. In the real world, there isn't enough of everything to go round and people suffer as a result. In the digital world, there is suffusion: anything can be duplicated almost endlessly at negligible cost. We are free to indulge ourselves to the utmost degree. Except, it turns out, people are rather attached to scarcity–and to difficulty, and to hard work, and to all those things that the narcissistic digital realm allegedly teaches us to avoid. We are deeply and fundamentally attracted, in fact, to games: those places where efforts and excellence are rewarded, where the challenges and demands are severe, and where success often resembles nothing so much as a distilled version of the worldly virtues of dedicated learning and rigorously co–ordinated effort."

(Tom Chatfield, 10 January 2010, The Observer)

Fig.1 Sid Laverents 'Multiple Sidosis' [multi–track techniques used to produce vision of a virtual one–man–band].

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abundanceapplication of designchildrencommoditycopydigital culturedigital worldduplicationeducationengagementgameshomogenizationinformationintegrationinteractionmarket commoditymulti-track • Multiple Sidosis • narcissismparticipationpaucityrewardscarcity • Sid Laverents • suffusionvirtual worlds • YouGov

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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