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10 APRIL 2011

The Internet as Art: In the digital age, the medium is the new message

"Just as video and computer technology attracted pioneering artists in the 1960s and 1970s, the Internet today is inspiring artists to tinker with the possibilities and boundaries of the World Wide Web. What started as a playful and often tongue–in–cheek experimental venture by a few code–savvy artists in the early 1990s has grown into a global art movement that is attracting attention from museums and private collectors. Karlsruhe–based media museum Zentrum fuer Kunst und Medientechnologie, or ZKM, has been running a series of net.art exhibitions. Berlin's Digital Art Museum recently showed the video performance 'Hammering the Void,' by Gazira Babeli, the pseudonym for an artist who exists only in Second Life, an online virtual reality game.

Among the artists who first saw the potential for creative uses of the information superhighway were Belgrade–born Vuk Cosic and Amsterdam–based artist duo Joan Heemskerk and Dirk Paesmans, who perform under the pseudonym jodi on the Web. Their early digital works, much like the art being made today by Italian duo Eva and Franco Mattes – who call themselves 0100101110101101.ORG – often imitated or at least paid ironic homage to the clandestine machinations of computer hackers."

(Goran Mijuk, 29 July 2009, Wall Street Journal)

Fig.1 'T–Visionarium' (2003–08), by Neil Brown, Dennis Del Favero, Jeffrey Shaw and Peter Weibel

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01012003artcodecreative practice • Dennis Del Favero • digital age • Digital Art Museum • digital cultureDirk Paesmans • error message • experimentationinteractive installationInternetJeffrey ShawJoan HeemskerkJODI (art collective)Karlsruhemedia artmediummedium is the messagemuseum • Neil Brown • net artnew mediaPeter WeibelpioneeringplayfulSecond Life (SL) • T-Visionarium • tinkertongue-in-cheekvideo artvideo performancevirtual realityZentrum fur Kunst und MedientechnologieZKM

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 APRIL 2011

Continue: from simple bifurcation to a graduated field of complexity

"*_Zu Beginn sind auf dem Bildschirm eine weiße und eine schwarze Fläche sichtbar, in denen Continue bzw. 'quit' geschrieben stehen. Entscheidet man sich per Mausklick für die zweite Möglichkeit verlässt man die Arbeit. Entscheidet man sich für die erste Variante, so verdoppelt sich jeweils die Zahl der Felder. Bald sind die sich stets verkleinernden Flächen nicht mehr als einzelne zu erkennen und mit der Maus ist kein eindeutige Wahl mehr zu treffen.

Continue ist eine minimalistische, konzeptuelle Arbeit, die immer wieder neu die immer gleiche Frage nach dem Fortsetzen des interaktiven Prozesses stellt."

(ZKM)

Fig.1,2,3 Dieter Kiessling (2002). 'Continue', artintact #4/2 in Jeffrey Shaw and Astrid Sommer Eds.'artintact', Zentrum für Kunst und Medientechnologie Karlsruhe

[The work progresses from distinct binary divisions identified as 'Quit' or 'Continue' to progressively smaller and smaller subdivisions creating an increasingly cinereous/greyer and more graduated field. In this way the work can be used as a metaphor to illustrate a type of complexity which Basil Bernstein describes as strong classification of discourse where 'the progression will be from concrete local knowledge, to the mastery of simple operations, to more abstract general principles' (2000, p.11).]

Bernstein, Basil. (2000). 'Pedagogy Symbolic Control and Identity, Theory Research Critique'. Oxford, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

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01011997abstractionartintactartistic practice • Astrid Sommer • bifurcationbinary • binary divisions • checkerboard • complexity • continue • Continue (Kiessling) • crisis of empiricismcritiquedatadesign formalism • Dieter Kiessling • DVD-ROM • graduated field • interactive designJeffrey Shawmetaphorpatternquitscalestrong classificationsubdivisionsZentrum fur Kunst und MedientechnologieZKM

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 MARCH 2009

Art and Education: an e-mail press release service

"Art&Education is an e–mail press release service announcing significant cultural events at universities worldwide as well as academic employment positions available in the visual arts.

Our mailing list comprises over 40,000 international artists, writers, art historians, curators, professors, and other visual arts professionals. [...] All announcements will be archived on our site, creating a valuable, free research tool for both art lovers and art professionals."

(e–flux)

Fig.1 Agnes Denes. Wheatfield – A Confrontation: Battery Park Landfill, downtown Manhattan, New York, NY Photograph by © Agnes Denes, 1982.

Fig.2 Interior view of La Cédille qui Sourit, ca. 1968. Photo © Jacques Strauch and Michou Strauch–Barelli. Courtesy Estate of Robert Filliou and Galerie Nelson–Freeman, Paris.

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2006 • academic employment positions • announcementsart and education • art professionals • art schoolsart students • CalArts • California Institute of the Arts • Columbia Universitycontemporary artcontemporary art exhibitionscontemporary art publicationscontemporary art symposiacreative practice • cultural events • culturedaily digeste-fluxe-mail listeducational programmesGoldsmiths College (University of London) • international journals • international networkmailing list • Malmo Art Academy • New Yorknews digestPiet Zwart Institutepraxis • Stadelschule • universitiesvisual art academicsvisual art professionalsvisual artsYale UniversityZentrum fur Kunst und MedientechnologieZKM

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JANUARY 2004

Their Things Spoken: a catalogue of Their belongings

"Their Things Spoken by Agnes Hegedüs refers to the gulf between the conservation and valuation of officially recognized cultural representations and the information content of bearers of personal significance originating in apparently unimportant, unknown biographies. The artist distributed among visitors to the ZKM a leaflet asking, 'Why not put your favorite object in a museum?' This question stimulated the museum visitors to reflect upon rituals of appreciating and keeping, and to relate the museum exhibits to the relics to which they attribute private significance.

Using a Polaroid camera to document contributors and objects, and a tape recorder for their stories and comments, she imposed no restrictions on the choice of personal favorites.

Her concern was to warehouse the portraits of people and objects in the most neutral possible way, so that every image and statement is equally valid. The DVD–ROM storage medium allows the body of contributions to be archived exactly as they were documented. The stories stand for themselves and, like an atlas of everyday life, show a random collection of people whose relationship to the world is revealed through the objects they identify with."
(Ursula Frohne)

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