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Which clippings match 'Past' keyword pg.1 of 2
13 AUGUST 2013

Retronaut: a curated collection of visual ephemera

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 DECEMBER 2011

Vintage 1950s advertising posters in disused passageways

"Vintage 1950s advertising posters in disused passageways at Notting Hill Gate tube station, London – photographed in 2010

Many people now know the story of the uncovered and disused ex–lift passageways in Notting Hill Gate tube station that LU workers rediscovered in 2010 after 50 years of being sealed up. ...

This view looks towards where the stairs down to the lifts would have been and shows the original 1900 tiled finishes along with a wall of posters, the Victor Galbraith 'Party Travel' poster, with an elephant, issued by London Transport itself being prominent.

The posters and passageways have, after much thought, been re–entombed and are again inaccessible so please don't pester the station staff"

(London Transport + Mikey Ashworth, 24 May 2010)

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TAGS

1950s195619592010advertisingadvertising posters • Around the World in Eighty Days (film) • Astoria Theatre • Charing Cross Road • David Niven • Deborah Kerr • disused • elephantfilm poster • hidden posters • Leicester Square Theatre • LondonLondon TransportLondon Underground • Notting Hill Gate • Notting Hill Gate Station • old posters • Party Travel • passageway • pastposter • Rita Hayworth • Separate Tables (film) • tiletime capsuleTube (transport)tube station • Victor Galbraith • vintage • Wendy Hiller

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 SEPTEMBER 2011

Career Narratives: stories that connect your past to your present

"A career narrative is basically a story about a career. It is a story that connects the protagonist's (i.e., the client's) past to the present in the sense that it conveys how the protagonist came to be what he or she is presently. This retrospective aspect of the narrative is supplemented with the career story's progressive aspect, in which the narrative puts into words the future that the protagonist is approaching. A career story is therefore both an account of how the protagonist came to be what he or she presently is, and furthermore, what future is expected for the protagonist to enact based on his or her particular past and present being."

(Torben K. Christensen; Joseph A. Johnston, pg.149)

2). Torben K. Christensen; Joseph A. Johnston (2003). "Incorporating the Narrative in Career Planning", Journal of Career Development; Spring 2003; 29, 3; ABI/INFORM Global.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 SEPTEMBER 2011

The Metaphor of Time as Space

"Many students of language are astounded by the fact that there are languages which lack tense. This confusion results from the fact that they do not realize that time is a semantic construct and tense is a linguistic one. All languages have ways of speaking about time, a semantic construct. Not all languages have linguistic markers of time, tense. Languages that lack tense, use time words to signal events that take place in the past, present, or future. With the passage of time, these time words become attached to verbs and the resulting conflation is known as tense. English has only two tenses: the present and the past. The future occurs as a time construct, but not as a linguistic one. In order to talk about the future in English, one must use a construction that employs the model will."

(Robert N. St. Clair, University of Louisville)

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TAGS

cultural construct • futurelanguagelanguages • linguistic construct • linguistic marker • metaphororderingpassage of timepastpresentsemantic construct • signal events • social construction of knowledgespace • tense • timetime as space • time words • transition

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 FEBRUARY 2011

Wild Strawberries: falling backwards through memories

Ingmar "Bergman's restless mind wouldn't even leave him to rest during a brief hospital stay, which is where he wrote the script for one of his earliest forays into the nature of age, memory and self–reflection. The core of the film had come to him the previous year while driving through his old hometown of Uppsala, past his grandmother's house. His fertile imagination wondered how it might be if he could open the door and step back into his own childhood, and from this kernel grew Wild Strawberries. In Swedish the title of Smultronstället has deeper meaning than just referring to a wild strawberry patch, it has a colloquial sense of a place invested with personal or sentimental value, often undervalued until it returns to memory in a nostalgic fashion. Which is precisely what the lead character of Isak Borg experiences throughout the film, falling backwards through his memories, attempting to make sense of his life in his final years. It's not an unusual thing for a Bergman film to be filled with casual slips between reality and dreams/memories, or to be populated with characters whose role is to aid our protagonist on his/her internal quest, but the lead character is not what we might envision in Bergman's work. Isak Borg is not a cruel man, but his self–centred cynicism and rampant egotism set him apart from the majority of other Bergman leads. But he needs to be such a vaguely unlikable character for the audience to experience the full impact of his self–realisation, dragged through a series of memories and forced to confront his continuing failures and inadequacies. A loveable, upright character would not have been able to supply so much powerful redemption in the final reel."

(Craig Andrews, Media Resource Centre)

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TAGS

195735mmacross timechildhoodchronological timecircular narrative structuredreamfilmimaginationin the mindIngmar Bergmaninternal quest • Iris Cinema • Lund Universitymemory • Mercury Cinema • nostalgiapastpersonalself-realisationself-reflection • Smultronstallet • SwedishSwedish filmmaker • Uppsala • Wild Strawberries (1957)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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