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31 MARCH 2015

Analysis of Human Flesh Search in the Taiwanese Context

"The advancement of internet technologies and the rapid rise of virtual communities have instigated internet human flesh search (HFS) or cyber manhunt in western countries [3] [4] that it has become a cyber phenomenon. HFS originated in China. The term was translated from 人肉搜尋 (Ren Rou Sou Suo [5]) which broadly refers to “an act of searching information about individuals or any subjects through the online collaboration of multiple users” [6].

Participation and collaboration by users play a vital role in the HFS process. On one hand, HFS practices, which are considered a manifestation of citizen empowerment and civil participation, are supported and applauded by other countries. On the other, majority of high-profile HFS cases in China have become aggressive and vicious, arousing research interest on the involved legal [3], privacy [7], and social issues [4].

Although Chen and Sharma [1] provide a comprehensive review of HFS that is supplemented by Chao [2], there is still a gap in research and in the analysis of HFS on a global context. The Taiwanese context is worthy of review because despite the abundance of HFS incidents occurring in the country, few studies on those have been shared to the international community."

(Yu-Hui Tao, Chian-Hsueng Chao, 2011)

Tao, Y.-H. and Chao, C.-S., Analysis of human flesh search in the Taiwanese context, in proceeding of the 2nd International Conference on Innovations in Bio-inspired Computing and Applications, December 16-18, Shenzhen, China, 2011

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 SEPTEMBER 2014

Human Flesh Search (HFS)

"This article studies an interesting Internet phenomenon known as Human Flesh Search which illustrates the far-reaching impacts of the Internet that is less documented. Due to its huge threat on individual privacy, human flesh search has introduced huge controversy and invited heated debate in China. This paper reviews its growth, explores the impetuses, identifies the distinctions from the alternative search engines, and summarizes the benefits and drawbacks. Furthermore, the paper develops a systematic review of the prior literature in human flesh search by surveying major sources such as academic journals, national and international conferences, and public and private databases. Finally, the paper identifies five research gaps in the literature and offers an initial interpretation and analysis of these remaining research issues. Human flesh search is still growing and the current study helps the computing field learn the past and present of this emerging phenomenon and properly manage its future development."

(Rui Chen and Sushil Sharma, 2011)

Rui Chen and Sushil Sharma (2011). Journal of Information Privacy and Security, Volume 7, Issue 1, 2011, pages 50-71.

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TAGS

20012011abuse • alternative search engines • breaching anonymity • breaching confidentiality • broadcasting personally identifiable information • committing an offense • controversycrowdsourcingcultural codescultural normscyber vigilantismcyberbullying • cyberposse • cyberpsychologydeath threats • denial-of-service attack • digilantism • distributed researching • DoS attack • doxing • doxxing • emerging phenomenon • etiquette • exposing corruption • exposing fraud • falsehoodgossipharassment • HFSE • Human Flesh Search (HFS) • human flesh search engine • identifying people • illegal access • individual privacy • information about specific individuals • information about specific organisations • information accuracy • information privacyinformation reliabilityinformation sharing • Internet phenomenon • Internet-based practice • massive human collaboration • monitoring • netizen • normsonline activismpanopticonpeople-powered searchPeoples Republic of Chinapublic humiliationpublic shamingpunishment • research gaps • research issues • revealing classified informationrevealing private informationRui Chensearch engines • social breach online • social controlsocial normssurveillanceSushil Sharmasystematic review • unofficial information • vigilante reactions • vigilantismviolation • vitrio

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 OCTOBER 2009

Internet Eyes: Public monitor CCTV from home

"Members of the public could earn cash by monitoring commercial CCTV cameras in their own home, in a scheme planned to begin next month. The Internet Eyes website will offer up to £1,000 if viewers spot shoplifting or other crimes in progress.

The site's owners say they want to combine crime prevention with the incentive of winning money. But civil liberties campaigners say the idea is 'distasteful' and asks private citizens to spy on each other.

The private company scheme – due to go live in Stratford–upon–Avon in November – aims to stream live footage to subscribers' home computers from CCTV cameras installed in shops and other businesses. If viewers see a crime in progress, they can press a button to alert store detectives and collect points worth up to £1,000.

Internet Eyes founder James Woodward said: 'This is about crime prevention. 'CCTV isn't watched, it isn't monitored, and not enough cameras are watched at any one time. 'What we're doing is we're putting more eyes onto those cameras so that they are monitored'."

(BBC NEWS, 6 October 2009, UK)

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TAGS

2009big brotherCCTVcivil liberties • civil liberty • controlcrime • crime prevention • Internet Eyes • James Woodward • monitorpanopticon • shoplifting • social interactionsocial realitysocietyspy • Stratford-upon-Avon • surveillanceUKvideo game • video surveillance

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2005

Regulation through discourses/practices

"The prison operates through the production of norms to divide the population into prisoners and non–prisoners. Since the goal of the prison is to return prisoners to the status of non–prisoners, there must be a criterion, one carefully and comprehensively elaborated, to recognise the non–prisoner, the prisoner, and the developmental stages in the change from the one to the other. There must also be a detailed regimen to effectuate the change. There must finally be a method or system of keeping track of the change in each prisoner. Foucault borrows from Bentham the term Panopticon (one who sees all) to denote the entire apparatus of defining the norm, disciplining the negative term, observing the change from the negative to the positive and studying the whole process so that it can be perfected. But there is a difference. For Bentham the Panopticon was an artifice that deflected the criminal's mind from the irrationality of transgression to the rationality of the norm. It imposed social authority on the prisoner in a constant, total manner. The prisoner's actions could be monitored by guards at any time but without his ever knowing it. The prisoner would, in Rousseau's phrase, be forced to be free. With no escape or reprieve from the Panoptical eye, the prisoner would accept the authority of the norm with its rational system of pleasures and pains. For Foucault the task is to see the system as an imposition of a structure of domination, not as a rational, humanist intention. As we know, the Panopticon, evaluated on the standards of liberal and Benthamite theory, is a failure. Foucault's aim is to grasp the workings of the Panopticon outside the liberal framework: if it does not reform prisoners, what does it do? What are the effects of the social text of the prison, of Panoptical discourse? His argument is that the prison, in the context of a liberal capitalist society that celebrates the anarchy of the marketplace, the chaos of free monads pursuing infinite wants, the rationality of the unhindered subject – the prison in this world imposes the technology of power, the 'micropolitics' of the norm. In capitalist society, regulation takes the form of discourses/practices that produce and reproduce the norm. The school, the asylum, the factory, the barracks to greater or lesser degrees and with considerable variation all imitate the Panopticon. In modern society power is imposed not by the personal presence and brute force of a caste of nobles as it was in earlier times but by the systematic scribblings in discourses, by the continual monitoring of daily life, adjusting and readjusting ad in finitum the norm of individuality. Modern society may be read as a discourse in which nominal freedom of action is canceled by the ubiquitous look of the other. It may be interpreted semiologically as a field of signs in which the metadiscourse of the Panopticon is reimposed everywhere, even in places in which it is not installed. We may suggest that the free individual requires a repressed other, a sort of external super–ego, an absent father if only to guarantee his or her freedom."

(Mark Poster pp.90–91)

Poster, Mark. 1990 The Mode of Information: Poststructuralism and Social Context, Cambridge, UK: Polity Press. ISBN: 0745603262

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TAGS

asylumauthority • barracks • biopolitical power relationscapitalismcontrolcultural normsdisciplinediscipline and punishmentdiscoursedominationfactoryJeremy Bentham • liberal capitalist society • Mark Poster • metadiscourse • Michel Foucaultmonadmonitoringnormspanopticonpracticeprisonprisonerpunishmentregulationrulesschoolsocial normsthe other
09 NOVEMBER 2003

Minority Report: pre-crime and information integrity

"In futuristic Washington, D.C., a system is established that can accurately predict when criminals are going to commit murder or violent crimes. This system, known as 'Pre–Crime', was set up by the respectable Lamar Burgess (Max von Sydow) and uses the abilities of a set of 3 special individuals known as 'Pre–Cogs'. These individuals, through visions or dreams, can see into the future and give a prediction of when a violent crime will occur, usually accurate to the second.

However, John Anderton (Tom Cruise), the head of 'Pre–Crime', is envisioned to have committed the future murder of a man he has never met before, and before he can be apprehended, he sets out headstrong to solve the mystery of this murder before it inevitably happens. As precious time ticks away, and consistencies with the 'pre–cog' visions become more and more prevalent, Anderton realises that the only way he will be able to solve the mystery, is to get the 'minority report' from the female pre–cog Agatha (Samantha Morton).

The 'minority report' is a vision that only one of the pre–cogs can see. In the system, all 3 pre–cogs see the same vision the vast majority of the time, however, on occasion, the female Agatha, who has been found to be the most talented of the 3, sees something different than the other 2, but this is usually disregarded in order to preserve the credibility of the system."

(Kim Bartlett)

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TAGS

2002authority • clairvoyance • controlcrime fictiondatadisciplineethical contextextrasensory perceptionfuturisticgesture devicehaptic interface • information integrity • lawMax von SydowMinority Reportmonitoringmulti-touch screenpanopticon • parapsychological phenomena • Philip K. Dick • pre-cog • pre-crime • pre-visualisation • predict • prisonprisoner • psychic detective • punishmentregulation • Samantha Morton • sci-fispeculative designSteven Spielberg • Tom Cruise • truthvisualisation
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