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Which clippings match 'National (political Party)' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 MARCH 2014

Norman Kirk split-screen political ad for 1969 NZ general election

"This 1969 advertisement for the Labour Party emphasised the leadership qualities of Norman Kirk and sought to capitalise on a public mood for change as that turbulent decade drew to a close. It screened in full colour in cinemas and in black–and–white on television (colour TV wasn't introduced until 1973). Its striking split–screen imagery and pop–styled theme song were clearly aimed at younger voters, a potentially important audience in an election when the voting age was lowered from 21 to 20 (it would be reduced further, to 18, in 1974). It was not enough, however, to oust Keith Holyoake's National government, which had ruled for the previous nine years."

TAGS

1969advertisementAotearoa New Zealand • campaign advertising • cinematic techniqueColenso BBDO • dancing Cossacks (political TV ad) • film techniquegeneral electionintra-frame • Keith Holyoake • Labour governmentLabour Party • mood for change • National (political party) • Norman Kirk • optical printing • political advertising • Prime MinisterRobert Muldoonsplit-screenThomas Crown Affair (1968) • turbulent decade • TV commercial

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 AUGUST 2013

Controversial Aotearoa New Zealand surveillance laws pass

"The controversial spy laws have been passed by Parliament by 61 votes to 59. The laws were drafted in the wake of a succession of blunders by New Zealand's foreign intelligence agency, the Government Communications Security Bureau, which included illegally spying on German internet entrepreneur Kim Dotcom. Earlier, Prime Minister John Key acknowledged new surveillance laws have 'alarmed' some people but blames the Government's opponents for stoking their fears. Legislation giving the GCSB the power to spy on New Zealanders was debated in Parliament today ahead of being passed into law."

(Tracy Watkins, 21 August 2013, Fairfax NZ News)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 SEPTEMBER 2011

Aotearoa New Zealand illegal online file-sharing laws pass

"(Apr. 18, 2011) On April 14, 2011, the New Zealand parliament passed the Copyright (Infringing File Sharing) Amendment Bill. (Press Release, Hon. Simon Power, New Regime for Section 92a Copyright Infringements (Apr. 14, 2011) [Press Release 1]; see also Copyright (Infringing File Sharing) Amendment Bill, New Zealand Legislation website (last visited Apr. 14, 2011).)

The bill establishes a new three–notice regime that seeks to deter illegal online file–sharing, replacing the previous approach that was set out by section 92A of the Copyright Act 1994. Section 92A, which was enacted in 2008 but never brought into force, would have required internet service providers (ISPs) to have, and reasonably implement, a policy for terminating the accounts of customers who repeatedly downloaded pirated material. (Press Release, Hon. Simon Power, Government to Amend Section 92A (Mar. 23, 2009); Press Release, Hon. Simon Power, Section 92A Bill Introduced to Parliament Today (Feb. 23, 2010); see also Press Release, Hon. Judith Tizard, Copyright (New Technologies) Amendment Comes into Force (Oct. 3, 2008).) ...

This regime will come into force from September 1, 2011, although it will not apply to cellular mobile networks until October 2013. (Press Release 1, supra.)"

(Kelly Buchanan, Global Legal Monitor, USA Law Library of Congress)

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TAGS

199420082011Aotearoa New Zealandcellular mobile networkscopyrightCopyright Act 1994copyright infringement • Copyright Tribunal • creative industriesdata regulationsdownloadingdownloading lawethicsfile sharing • illegal online file-sharing • infringing file sharingintellectual property • international legal news • Internet file sharing law • Internet Piracy Bill • internet service providerISP • Judith Tizard • legallegislationLibrary of Congresslicensemonitoringmusic downloadingNational (political party)new technologiesoffenceP2Ppeer-to-peerpiracypirated materialregulationremixsection 92ashare • Simon Power

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 FEBRUARY 2009

Patu!: documenting the actions of the NZ anti-apartheid movement during the 1981 Springbok rugby tour

"Merata Mita's Patu! is a remarkable protest story told in the face of adversity, and a monument to a time when New Zealand was torn in two by the 1981 Springbok rugby tour. You were either for or against. And Patu!, with its highly–charged images of violent clashes between police and anti–tour marchers, is firmly sided with the later. It is passionate, activist film–making at its most compelling.

The Springbok rugby tour to New Zealand was seen by some as endorsement of South Africa's separatist government. When the New Zealand Rugby Football Union and the NZ government ignored calls to cancel the tour, the NZ anti–apartheid movement planned peaceful protest marches to attempt to sway the government's decision.
...
Once the tour started, sports grounds and suburban streets became battlefields, as clashes escalated between police and the highly–mobilised protesters. Filmed over the winter of 1981, several camera operators (including industry heavyweights) contributed their time free of charge and became foreign correspondents in their own country, capturing on–the–run footage of the tour clashes.
...
Due to the mass of cinema verite style footage, Mita and editor Annie Collins had to examine many hours of footage, collected from several different sources (including 16 field camera operators). But the effort pays off.
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The completed film, now 110 minutes long, was a record of heroism for the liberal left in New Zealand. For many young people taking to the streets, it was their 1968. Māori and Pākehā, children and grandparents, gang members and clergymen, in a moment of rare consensus, stood together to affirm shared values. Patu! was also a morale booster for the African National Congress.
...
Patu! is a landmark in New Zealand's film history."
(Mihi Murray, 30.08.2008)

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TAGS

19811981 Springbok rugby tour • African National Congress • Amandla • Amandla Ngawethu • ANC • Annie Collins • anti-apartheid • Aotearoa New Zealandapartheidcivil libertiesdirect cinemadocumentary filmhistoryMaoriMerata MitaNational (political party) • New Zealand Rugby Football Union • NZ On Screen • NZRU • PakehaPatu! • PR24 Control Baton • protestracismrugbySouth Africawomen in film

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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