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Which clippings match 'Modularity In Design' keyword pg.1 of 2
12 SEPTEMBER 2013

Phone Bloks: user customisation through modular design

"Phone components all sharing a common purpose. You may be wondering if is really possible to design and manufacture a modular blok phone cost effectively? We believe it is, and we are asking for your support so that you can be directly involved in making this project a reality. Check out the incredible ideas we're working on in the PhoneBloks video, and think about how this would change your future cell phone upgrade plans."

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2013block • blok phone • brickcell phonecomponent systemcrowdfundingcustomisable • customisation • Dave Hakken • design responsibilitydisposable consumptionflexible designs • interchangeable parts • KickstarterLEGOmodular designmodular structuremodular systemmodularity in designpartphone • Phone Bloks • phone upgrade • PhoneBloks • planned obsolescenceproduct designradical innovationrecombinantreconstructive modelreplacementsmartphonesocial enterprisespeculative designstart-up businesssustainable design principlestechnology innovationtransformable • upgrade • upgrade plans • user customisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 AUGUST 2013

BEM (Block, Element, Modifier): web naming standardisation

"One of the most common examples of a methodology in programming is Object–Oriented Programming. It's a programming paradigm embodied by many languages. In some ways, BEM is similar to OOP. It's a way of describing reality in code, a range of patterns, and a way of thinking about program entities regardless of programming languages being used.

We used BEM principles to create a set of front–end development techniques and tools, that allow us to build websites quickly and maintain them over a long time."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 APRIL 2013

Contemporary kinetic typography relies on historical developments

"This is a lecture given to MA students at the University of Hertfordshire. It explores how contemporary kinetic typography relies on historical developments such as 3D woodblock print, Romain du Roi, and Modernist modular lettering. Students are encouraged to let their design work respond to historical research. This does not mean creating something that looks old or retro, rather creating something innovative and new by re–imagining historical ideas in light of new technologies and contexts."

(Barbara Brownie)

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3D typography • Academie des Sciences • architectural formsart and design • Barbara Brownie • Bauhaus School • borrowing from the past • Channel 4Channel 4 identchannel identDe Stijl • design nostalgia • grid systemhistorical developmentsJosef Alberskinetic typographyKyle Cooper • learning from history • lecturemachine aesthetic • malleable typography • modular typography • modularity in designmorphingparodypostmodern pasticheprimitive shapesprimitivesrecontextualisation • reinvention • remediation • retrievalism • retroRoland Barthes • Romain du Roi • School of Creative Arts • Stencil (typeface) • TV identtypographic animationtypographyunified wholeUniversity of Hertfordshirevisual abstractionwoodblock printing

CONTRIBUTOR

Mary-joy Ashley
09 SEPTEMBER 2012

Modular architecture central to Christchurch's urban regeneration

"Martin Trusttum, from CPIT's Faculty of Creative Industries, likens his ArtBox project to a game of Tetris. 'It's just like Tetris but in slow motion. They are cubes and eventually they will come together to form a precinct.'

ArtBox will be located on the corner of Madras and St Asaph streets on the old Southlander Tavern–Jetset Lounge site opposite Anton Parsons' sculpture Passing Time.

It is a rare collection of mobile and flexible modules designed by Sydenham–based F3 and will offer about 18 spaces suitable for galleries and studios. It offers a practical, timely solution to the many low–cost premises used as galleries and studios destroyed by the February 2011 earthquake. "

(Vicki Anderson, 07 September 2012, Stuff.co.nz)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 OCTOBER 2008

Nakagin Capsule Tower

"Kisho Kurokawa can't seem to catch a break these days. Just days after the Japanese architect lost his bid for the governorship of Tokyo, the Nakagin Capsule Tower, his best known building and one of the few built examples of the Metabolist movement, was given a date with the wrecking ball.

The Capsule Tower, completed in 1972, stands in the centre of Tokyo's affluent Ginza neighbourhood. The building is actually composed of two concrete towers, respectively 11 and 13 stories, each encrusted with an outer layer of prefabricated living units. It has long been appreciated by architects as a pure expression of the Metabolist movement, popular in the 1960s and 1970s, which envisioned cities formed of modular components. But in recent years residents expressed growing concern over the presence of asbestos. On April 15, the building's management association approved plans calling for the architectural icon to be razed and replaced with a new 14–story tower. A demolition is yet to be determined.

For his part, Kurokawa has pleaded to let the Capsule Tower express one of its original design qualities: flexibility. He suggested 'unplugging' each box and replacing it with an updated unit, letting the base towers –which he calls 'timeless'–remain untouched. Japan's four major architectural organisations, including the Japan Institute of Architects, support this scheme. But the building's management remained unconvinced and raised concerns regarding the towers' ability to withstand earthquakes, as well as its inefficient use of valuable land. The new building will increase floor area by 60 percent.

Following the board's decision, only Kurokawa continues to raise protest. If the Capsule Tower is destroyed as planned, it will join a growing list of losses. His Sony Tower in Osaka, completed in 1976, came down last year; Plantec Architects designed a glass–walled commercial building that will replace it."
(Yuki Solomon, Architectural Record)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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