Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Metaphorical Representation' keyword pg.1 of 2
06 JUNE 2019

Astroturfing: corporate interests disguised as spontaneous popular movements

"The term 'astroturfing' is a play on the term 'grassroots movement,' since the grass is fake. Astroturfing has been attempted by online businesses who present a product as being highly desired and sought out by a certain customer base via company-sponsored message board posts, blogs or articles when there is no evidence to support such an assertion."

(BigCommerce)

1

TAGS

advocacy groups • astroturf kingpin • astroturfing • astroturfing (phenomenon) • authentic response • authenticitybaseless claimsbelieving lies to be true • block legislation • campaign advertisingcognitive dissonanceconservative ideologyconservative think tankcontradictory narratives • controversial practice • corporate behaviour • corporate bullying • corporate lobbyingcorporations • corrupt practices • credibility • deceitful practices • deceitfulnessdeceptiondeliberate intention to misleaddiscrediting expertsdishonestydrunk drivingemotive manipulation • Employment Policy Institute • fake • fake grass-roots • fake grassroots movements • fake news • fake personas • fake reviews • fallacious argumentsfalse claims • falsified testimony • food safetygrass rootsgrassroots movement • hidden funding • illusion and reality • illusion of a populist idea. • inference • John Oliver • Last Week Tonight • Last Week Tonight with John Oliver HBO • lobbying • lobbyist • marketing practicesmemesmetaphorical representation • minimum wage • misleading message • misleading practices • mistruths • non-profit front groups • outreach • oversimplification • paid sick leave • perception management • pretending to be unbiased • public advocacy groups • public interest • public outreach • public-interest groups • Richard Berman • Rick Berman • secondhand cigarette smoke • sockpuppets • spontaneous popular movements • testimonies • the illusion of authenticity • undercover marketingunethical behaviourwhat is really happening

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 NOVEMBER 2014

Metaphors as Problem-solving Aids

"Metaphors facilitate the understanding of an unfamiliar situation in terms of a known situation (Ortony, 1991). By means of metaphors, it is possible to make reference to what is clearly understood in order to elucidate the unknown. Basically, metaphors constitute an uncommon juxtaposition of the familiar and the unusual. They induce the discovery of innovative associations that broaden the human capacity for interpretation (Lakoff, 1987, 1993). For that reason, metaphors are seen as valuable aids in problem–solving tasks.

The relevance of metaphors to problem–solving is pertinent to three fundamental steps (Gentner, Bowdle, Wolff, & Boronat, 2001). The first step consists of extracting a variety of unfamiliar concepts from remote domains, where possible relationships with the problem at hand are not always evident. The second step involves establishing a mapping of deep or high–level relationships between the metaphorical concept and the problem. Correspondences are identified by means of abstractions and generalizations. Relationships of secondary importance are discarded, and only structural correspondences between the metaphorical source and the problem are set up. The last step deals with transferring and applying structural correspondences associated with the metaphorical source to the problem at hand, which at the end generally leads to a novel solution."

(Hernan Pablo Casakin, 2007)

Hernan Pablo Casakin (2007). "Metaphors in Design Problem Solving: Implications for Creativity." International Journal of Design 1(2).

1

TAGS

abstraction and generalisationaid to understanding • analogous correspondence • Andrew Ortony • Brian Bowdle • Consuelo Boronat • Dedre Gentner • George Lakoff • innovative associations • International Journal of Design • metaphorical concept • metaphorical representation • metaphorical source • novel solution • Phillip Wolff • problem abstraction • problem at hand • problem-solving • problem-solving aids • remote domains • structural correspondences • theory buildingthinking tools • uncommon juxtaposition • unfamiliar concepts • unifying metaphorunifying strategyvisual punvisual rhetoric

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 JULY 2014

An animated primer on the use of metaphors

"How do metaphors help us better understand the world? And, what makes a good metaphor? Explore these questions with writers like Langston Hughes and Carl Sandburg, who have mastered the art of bringing a scene or emotion to life."

(Jane Hirshfield and Ben Pearce, TED–Ed)

1

TAGS

Ben Pearce • Carl Sandburg • choice of wordscomprehending languagedepiction • depictions of real-life • figurative languagehaikuindirect reference • Jane Hirshfield • Langston Hughes • literary devices • literary technique • mental imagemetaphormetaphoric referencemetaphorical representationpoetic function • simile • TED-Edthoughts and feelingsuse of words

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MAY 2013

Can Histories Be True? Narrativism, Positivism, and the MetaphoricalTurn

"Narrativism, as represented by Hayden White and Frank Ankersmit, can fruitfully be analyzed as an inversion of two brands of positivism. First, narrativist epistemology can be regarded as an inversion of empiricism. Its thesis that narratives function as metaphors which do not possess a cognitive content is built on an empiricist, 'picture view' of knowledge. Moreover, all the non–cognitive aspects attributed as such are dependent on this picture theory of knowledge and a picture theory of representation. Most of the epistemological characteristics that White and Ankersmit attribute to historical narratives therefore share the problems of this picture theory.

The article's second thesis is that the theories of narrative explanation can also fruitfully be analyzed as inversions of positivist covering–law theory. Ankersmit's brand of narrativism is the most radical in this respect because it posits an opposition between narrative and causal modes of comprehension while simultaneously eliminating causality from narrativist historical understanding. White's brand of narrativism is more of a hybrid than is Ankersmit's as far as its theory of explanation is concerned; nevertheless, it can also be fruitfully interpreted as an inversion of covering–law theory, replacing it by an indefinite multitude of explanatory strategies.

Most of the striking characteristics of both White's and Ankersmit's narrativism pre–suppose positivism in these two senses, especially their claim that historical narratives have a metaphorical structure and therefore no truth–value. These claims are had to reconcile with the factual characteristics of debates by historians; this problem can be tracked down to the absence in 'metaphorical' narrativism of a conceptual connection between historical narratives and historical research."

(Chris Lorenz, 1998, Wiley–Blackwell)

Lorenz, C. (1998). "Can Histories Be True? Narrativism, Positivism, and the "MetaphoricalTurn"." History and Theory 37(3): 309–329.

TAGS

causal modes of comprehensioncausality • cognitive content • conceptual connection • empiricism • emplotment • explanatory strategy • factual characteristics • Frank Ankersmit • Hayden White • historical chronicles • historical narrative • historical narrativeshistorical researchhistorical understandinghistoriesknowledge • metahistory • metanarrativemetaphormetaphoric reference • metaphorical narrativism • metaphorical representation • metaphorical structure • metaphorical turn • narrative explanation • narratives • narrativism • narrativist epistemology • picture theory • picture view of knowledge • positivismrepresentation • storied ways of communicating • storied ways of knowing • truth claims • truth-value

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 OCTOBER 2012

Storyville: Exploring narratives of learning and teaching, the 2nd annual HEA Arts and Humanities conference, 2013

Date: 29 May 2013 – 30 May 2013

Location/venue: Thistle Brighton, King's Road, Brighton, England, BN1 2GS

The Higher Education Academy's second annual learning and teaching Arts and Humanities conference, 'Storyville: Exploring narratives of learning and teaching' will take place on 29–30 May 2013 in Brighton.

"At the heart of the Arts and Humanities disciplines sit stories–stories which create and recreate worlds, distant and present, stories which inspire and engage, stories which grow imaginations and expand what is thinkable.

Stories are everywhere, and our second annual conference seeks to explore the intersections between narrative and learning and teaching..."

(Higher Education Academy, UK)

TAGS

2013academic identitiesanthologyarchivearts and humanities • assessing creatively • conference • create and recreate worlds • creating stories • curricula designdesigning learning experiencesdisciplinary boundarieseducator • experimental forms • gamifyinggamifying learning and teachingHannah ArendtHEHEAHigher Education Academy • how students learn • how we teach • inspire and engage • Key Information Set (KIS)learning and teachinglearning storiesliterary devicesmetaphormetaphorical representationnaming processnarrative account • narrative and learning • narrative co-creation • narrative framingnarratives of discovery • narratives we teach by • National Student Survey • our stories • pedagogypractice narrativesrehearsal • research-based teaching • sharing stories • social presence • stories • storyville • student journey • students as partners • teaching and learning • teaching methodologies • teaching-based research • telling storiestravelogue • tweeting • tweetsUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.