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21 OCTOBER 2013

3 Design Layouts: Gutenberg Diagram, Z-Pattern, and F-Pattern

"Several layout patterns are often recommended to take advantage of how people scan or read through a design. 3 of the more common are the Gutenberg diagram, the z–pattern layout, and the f–pattern layout. ... While patterns like the Gutenberg diagram, the z–pattern, and the f–pattern layout suggest that there is a natural path the eye will take through a design, the reality is they refer only to designs dominated by large blocks of text with little to no hierarchy. ... Instead of trying to force your design into one of the patterns described, decide instead what information you want the viewer to see and through a series of focal points and design flow lead their eyes through your hierarchy of information. That's really the only pattern you need to use."

(Steven Bradley, 7 February 2011)

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design for the screen • F-layout design • F-pattern • Gutenberg diagram • layoutlayout designlayout patternslayoutspage layoutpage layout designpage layout patternUIviewing experiencevisual communicationvisual screen designweb designweb layoutweb page layoutsweb pages • Z-layout design • Z-pattern

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JUNE 2012

Internet Archaeology: graphic artefacts from our recent past

"Internet Archaeology seeks to explore, recover, archive and showcase the graphic artifacts found within earlier Internet Culture. Established in 2009, the chief purpose of Internet Archaeology is to preserve these artifacts and acknowledge their importance in understanding the beginnings and birth of an Internet Culture. We focus on graphic artifacts only, with the belief that images are most culturally revealing and immediate. Most of the files in our archive are in either JPG or GIF format and are categorized by either still or moving image, they are then arranged in various thematic subcategories. Currently, a major focus of Internet Archaeology is on the archiving and indexing of images found on Geocities websites, as their existence has been terminated by parent company Yahoo; who discontinued GeoCities operation on October 26, 2009. Internet Archaeology is an ongoing effort which puts preservation paramount. Unlike traditional archaeology, where physical artifacts are unearthed; Internet Archaeology's artifacts are digital, thus more temporal and transient. Yet we believe that these artifacts are no less important than say the cave paintings of Lascaux. They reveal the origins of a now ubiquitous Internet Culture; showing where we have been and how far we have come."

(Internet Archaeology)

Via Chelsea Nichols [http://ridiculouslyinteresting.wordpress.com/2011/11/26/internet–archaeology–the–best–of–90s–internet–graphics/]

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1990s200920th century phenomenaaestheticsarchaeologyarchivearchiving • archiving and indexing • artefactcave paintingscultural codes • culturally revealing • cyber archaeologycyberculturedigital anthropologydigital artefactsdigital cultureemergence of the webGeocitiesGIF format • graphic artefacts • graphic artifacts • graphic designimagesindexindexingInternetinternet archaeologyinternet culture • JPG • JPG format • Lascauxnew mediaobsolescencepreservationrecent pasttransiencevisual designweb designweb pagesweb publishingYahoo!

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JUNE 2012

Internet Cafés: hybrids involving analogue and digital, virtual and real

"Terms like 'Internet café' or 'cybercafé' bring us right back to the 90s along with phrases like 'web page' or 'digital divide', which were invented to describe new hybrids involving analog and digital, virtual and real as well as the present and near future.

It's not that these terms have grown obsolete. It's rather that these 20th–century phenomena they once described have outgrown their terminology. They were born as metaphors, but over time turned into idioms, and their analog parts were the first [to] lose their original meanings. People who did not witness the emergence of the web do not fully understand why browser content is still called a 'page'. It's has also become unclear what public internet access facilities have in common with cafés, yet we continue calling them 'internet cafés' or 'cybercafés'."

(Olia Lialina, 2012–01–10)

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1990s20th century20th century phenomenaanalogue and digitalarchaeology • Bart Plantenga • browser content • cafecafescyber archaeology • cybercafe • cybercafes • cyberculture • Danja Vasiliev • digital archaeologydigital culturedigital divideDragan Espenschiedemergence of the web • Florian Cramer • Goethe Institute • Goethe-Instituthistoryhome pagehybrid formidiomInternetinternet archaeology • internet cafe • internet cafes • inventionJODI (art collective) • Leslie Robbins • metaphor • near future • new cosmopolitanism • new hybrids • obsolescenceOlia Lialina • original meaning • outgrownpage metaphorphenomenaphenomenonPiet Zwart Institute • Piet Zwart Institute Willem de Kooning Academy Rotterdam University • public internet access • Renee Turner • Rotterdam • Rotterdam University • terminologythe pastvirtual and realwebweb pages • Wendelien van Oldenborgh • Willem de Kooning Academy • www

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MAY 2012

Luke Wroblewski on: Multi-device Layout Patterns

"Through fluid grids and media query adjustments, responsive design enables Web page layouts to adapt to a variety of screen sizes. As more designers embrace this technique, we're not only seeing a lot of innovation but the emergence of clear patterns as well. I cataloged what seem to be the most popular of these patterns for adaptable multi–device layouts."

(Luke Wroblewski, 14 March 2012, via Christopher Allwood)

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adapt to screen sizes • adaptable multi-device layout • adaptive layoutBBC • column • column drop • columnscommunication design • design for large screen • design for mobiledesign for the screendesign innovationFacebook • Five Simple Steps • fluid grids • Food Sense (website) • Google (GOOG)grid systemHCI • image layout • information architectureinteraction designinterface designlayout • layout adjustments • layout designlayout patterns • layout shifter • layouts • Luke Wroblewski • margins • media query adjustments • mobile design • Modernizr • mostly fluid • multi device • multi-column layout • multi-devicemulti-device adaptation • multi-device layout patterns • multiple screen sizes • NUI • off canvas • optimised for mobilepage layoutpage layout pattern • Path (app) • responsive design • responsive design layout patterns • responsive web design • screen size • screen sizesscreen space • single column layout • small screen • small screen sizes • small screens • stacking • stacking columns • The Boston Globe • tiny tweaks • Trent Walton • UIusabilityvisual communicationvisual screen designweb designweb page layoutsweb pageswebsite

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 SEPTEMBER 2008

W3C: standardising the web

"The W3C mission is to lead the World Wide Web to its full potential by developing protocols and guidelines that ensure the long–term growth of the Web. Below we discuss important aspects of this mission, all of which further W3C's vision of One Web."

(World Wide Web Consortium)

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19941995adoption of standardsagreementARPAnetCERN • compatibility • computer scienceconsortium • core principles • DARPA • Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency • digital cultureEuropean Commission • European Organization for Nuclear Research • guidelinesHTML • incompatibility • inconsistency • industry members • information technology • INRIA • international communityInternet • Jeffrey Jaffe • knowledge management • LCS • Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory • member organisations • MITnew medianew standardsone webontologypredictabilityprinciplesprotocolssemantic websoftware engineeringsolutionspecificationstandardisationstandards compliantstandards-based web technologiesstructurestructured datatechnologyTim Berners-Leeunificationusability • vendors • W3Cwebweb pagesweb standards • World Wide Web Consortium

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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