Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Margins' keyword pg.1 of 1
11 AUGUST 2012

Medieval manuscript illustrations were planned not doodled

"it's the word 'doodle' that really riles my pedantic dander. ... because, as I try to make clear, the images I post ... weren't scribbled into the margins by surreptitious snarkers whilst no one was looking. They were explicitly commissioned by the manuscript's patrons as part of the project from the very beginning. For the well–heeled noble, ordering a book was not just a matter of selecting the text; deciding on size, presentation, illustration, and ratio of naked dudes to non–naked dudes in the margins was all part of the process of getting a book made.

This is not to say that medieval readers and scribes didn't ever doodle. It's just easy to tell the difference between images planned as part of the manuscript's commission and those scribbled in by a creative, bored scribe or one of the later owners of the manuscript. Just as you might imagine, a reader might decide a chunk of text was particularly important and make a note in the margin ... Or, someone might just decide a page looked too blank and thus attempt to fill up some of that space [1]... See, the thing about medieval doodles is they look just like modern doodles ...

For this page [2], somebody sat down and sketched out a rough draft, showed it to somebody else, possibly even multiple somebodies. There were meetings. Consultants were brought in. The client was consulted. And at some point somebody said, 'Yes, that's very nice, the nuns smuggling that dude into their nunnery. Very topical. But I don't like that blanket. Too drab. Can we get someone to put some flowers on it? The difference is, I hope, clear. You don't doodle in gold leaf."

(Carl Pyrdum, 13 February 2012, Got Medieval)

1

2

TAGS

annotationannotationsbookclientcomment systemcommentscommission • commissioned • doodledoodlingembellishmentexpository addendum • fill the space • footnotegloss (marginal notation) • gold leaf • illuminated manuscriptillustrationsinformation in contextmanuscript • manuscript illustrations • manuscriptsmargin notes • marginal illustrations • marginal notationmarginaliamarginsmedieval • medieval doodles • medieval readers • modern doodles • nakednotationnote in the marginnotesnunpage • planned images • planned not doodled • rough draft • scholia • scribbled • scribbled into the marginsvisual depiction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MAY 2012

Luke Wroblewski on: Multi-device Layout Patterns

"Through fluid grids and media query adjustments, responsive design enables Web page layouts to adapt to a variety of screen sizes. As more designers embrace this technique, we're not only seeing a lot of innovation but the emergence of clear patterns as well. I cataloged what seem to be the most popular of these patterns for adaptable multi–device layouts."

(Luke Wroblewski, 14 March 2012, via Christopher Allwood)

1

TAGS

adapt to screen sizes • adaptable multi-device layout • adaptive layoutBBC • column • column drop • columnscommunication design • design for large screen • design for mobiledesign for the screendesign innovationFacebook • Five Simple Steps • fluid grids • Food Sense (website) • Google (GOOG)grid systemHCI • image layout • information architectureinteraction designinterface designlayout • layout adjustments • layout designlayout patterns • layout shifter • layouts • Luke Wroblewski • margins • media query adjustments • mobile design • Modernizr • mostly fluid • multi device • multi-column layout • multi-devicemulti-device adaptation • multi-device layout patterns • multiple screen sizes • NUI • off canvas • optimised for mobilepage layoutpage layout pattern • Path (app) • responsive design • responsive design layout patterns • responsive web design • screen size • screen sizesscreen space • single column layout • small screen • small screen sizes • small screens • stacking • stacking columns • The Boston Globe • tiny tweaks • Trent Walton • UIusabilityvisual communicationvisual screen designweb designweb page layoutsweb pageswebsite

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.