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Which clippings match 'Orientalism' keyword pg.1 of 2
18 JANUARY 2014

The strobing title animation of Enter the Void

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2009clubbingcounterculturecredit sequence • Cyril Roy • drug dealer • drug takingdrug userEnter the Void (2009)fantasy filmfilm title designfirst-person point of view • Gaspar Noe • love hotel • Nathaniel Brown • neon club scene • neon-litnightclubopening title sequenceopening titlesorientalism • out-of-body experience • Paz de la Huerta • pharmaceutical aesthetics • psychedelic • psychedelic melodrama • stripper • strobingsubculture • technophilia • title sequencetitlesTokyotypographic animationvisceral journey

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 MARCH 2013

Chinoiserie at Lincolnshire's Belton House

"Hand painted C18th Chinese wallpaper at Belton in the Chinese Bedroom with a continuous scene of a garden party. Cornice, dado and other joinery painted to imitate bamboo."

(National Trust, UK)

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18th centurybamboobedroom • Belton House • Chinese • Chinese Bedroom • Chinese wallpaper • Chinoiseriecontinuous scenedecordecorationdecorative artsdepictionEast Midlands • furnishings • garden party • great country house • hand-paintedinterior designLincolnshire • National Trust • National Trust Images • oriental • orientalismornamentalpaintingscenery • stately home • UKvisual designvisual patternwallpaper

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2013

Examples of Chinese ornament selected from objects in the South Kensington museum and other collections

"We have long been familiar with the power of the Chinese to balance colours, but we were not so well acquainted with their power of treating purely ornamental or conventional forms ; and in the chapter in the Grammar of Ornament on Chinese Ornament I was led, from my then knowledge, to express the opinion that the Chinese had not the power of dealing with conventional ornamental form : but it now appears that there has been a period in which a School of Art existed in China of a very important kind. We are led to think that this art must in some way have had a foreign origin; it so nearly resembles in all its principles the art of the Mohammedan races, that we may presume it was derived from them. It would be no difficult task to take a work of ornament of this class, and, by simply varying the colouring and correcting the drawing, convert it into an Indian or Persian composition. There is of course, in all these works, something essentially Chinese in the mode of rendering the idea, but the original idea is evidently Mohammedan. The Moors of the present day decorate their pottery under the same instinct, and follow the same laws as the Chinese obeyed in their beautiful enamelled vases. The Moorish artist takes a rudely–fashioned pot or other object, and by a marvellous instinct divides the surface of the object, 'by spots of colour, into triangles of proportionate area, according to the form and size of the object; these triangles are then crossed by others."

(Owen Jones, 1867)

Owen Jones (1867). "Examples of Chinese Ornament Selected from Objects in the South Kensington Museum and Other Collections: By Owen Jones. One Hundred Plates", S. & T. Gilbert, 4 Copthall Buildings, E.C. Back of the Bank of England.

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1867 • ceramic glaze • ceramicsChinesecolourcompositioncultural heritagecultural significance of objectsdecorationdecorative arts • enamel • enamelled vases • flowersformglazeIndianInternet ArchiveIslamicmaterial culture • Mohammedan • Moorish • Moors • motifMuslim • object surface • orientalismornamentalornamental formOwen JonesPeoples Republic of China • Persian • pigmentpotspottery • rudely fashioned • South Kensingtonsymbolic meaning • vase • visual appearancevisual designvisual grammar • visual heritage • visual motifvisual pattern

CONTRIBUTOR

Guannan (cassie) Du
26 NOVEMBER 2009

Intellectual Discourse and the Politics of Modernization: Negotiating Modernity in Iran

"Jurgen Habermas's theory of modernity also attempts a rejuvenation of modernity. For Habermas, the 'crisis of modernity' is not indicative of the final collapse of the Enlightenment project, but instead reveals the deficiencies of what has heretofore been a one–sided and inadequate modernity. Thus, modernity is an 'incomplete' project, and the question of modernization becomes central to completing modernity.(18) Habermas argues that our contemporary experience of modernity has been unduly dominated by a single type of rationality, specifically by purposive or instrumental rationality.(19) The discontents of modernity, then, are not rooted in rationalization or modernization as such, but 'in the failure to develop and institutionalize all the different dimensions of reason in a balanced way.'(20) This (re)opening of modernity to different means of rationalizing the life world has led John Tomilson to suggest that Habermas's vision denies an inevitable path of modernization, that '. . . the sort of modernity that the West has developed and passed on to the 'developing world' is not the only possible historical route out of the chains of tradition.' (21) However, Habermas makes this opening while retaining a commitment to the Enlightenment project of universal modernity. His modernization of modernity would re–route towards a model of communicative action, and a more open rationality of ideal speech acts. Thus, modernization becomes an intellectual/rational project working towards an ideal speech situation."

(Ali Mirsepassi, 2000. Cambridge University Press)

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2000Anthony Giddenscrisis of modernityEnlightenment projectEuropean Enlightenment • Habermas • institutionalisationinstrumental rationalityIran • John Tomilson • Jurgen Habermas • Marshall Berman • modernisationmodernity • modernization • Occidentalism • Occidentalist discontent • orientalism • Persia • rationalisationrationalityreflexive modernisationtraditionuniversal modernityWestern

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2009

1001 Inventions

"1001 Inventions is a British based, award-winning science and cultural heritage organisation engaging over 200 million people around the world.

1001 Inventions uncovers a thousand years of scientific and cultural achievements from Muslim Civilisation from the 7th century onwards, and how those contributions helped create the foundations of our modern world."

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1001 Inventions (exhibition) • 2006 • Ahmed Salim • ancient civilizations • ancient culturesArabic scienceautomation • Ben Kingsley • Birmingham Thinktank • California Science Center • cultural heritagedark ages • Doha Museum of Islamic Art • Glasgow Science Centre • golden agehistory of ideas • Islamic civilisation • Islamic cultureIslamic Golden Age • Malaysia National Science Centre • Manchester Museum of Science and Industry • mechanical innovationmedieval inventionMiddle East • Museum of Croydon • Muslim civilization • Muslim history • National Museum Cardiff • New York Hall of Science • Omar Sharif • orientalism • Pusat Sains Negara • science and technologyscience historyScience Museum of London • travelling exhibition

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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