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17 JUNE 2012

The Greek Crisis Explained: Nomint's animated trilogy

"The Greek Crisis explained in 3 episodes. We didn't want to have our hands tied when it came to Greek Financial Crisis. It was a joint decision to set them free, and this is what they came up with; the 'Greek Crisis Explained' Trilogy. This project was basically assigned by us to ourselves and our brief was happily clear–cut: 'Present our very own version of the Greek Crisis'. And the story goes like this; Greece, a young spoiled girl gets devoured by Dept [sic], a humongous monster. EU cannot help Greece out on its own. And when all hope is lost, IMF is brought into play..."

(Nomint)

Fig.1 "Greek Crisis Explained", CONCEPT / DIRECTION / DESIGN / ANIMATION / PRODUCTION: NOMINT nomint.gr/ Creative direction: Christos Lefakis, Yannis Konstantinidis, Direction / Story: Marilena Vatseri, Manos Gerogiannis, Christos Lefakis, Yannis Konstantinidis, Animation: Marilena Vatseri, Manos Gerogiannis, Christos Lefakis, Yannis Konstantinidis, Lead design: George Xanthos (aka Weirdink), Additional design: Manolis Mavris, Sound design: Christos Lefakis, Voiceover: Ross Douglas, Production Team: Aristotelis Michailidis, Marianna Papachristodoulou

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TAGS

20102D animationanimated presentationbeastborrowingcrises of capitalismcrisisdebtdebt crisiseconomic crisiseconomyEUEU policy agendasEuro crisisEuropeEuropean affairs • European economic integration • European Unionfinancial crisis • financial debt • girlglobal financial crisisgraphic representationGreeceGreek crisis • Greek Crisis Explained • Greek financial crisisillustrationIMFinformation graphicsInternational Monetary Fund • medical operation • monster • Nomint • operationvisual communicationvisual depiction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JUNE 2011

The hospital, contains the complete arsenal of modern healing, but is devoted to a radical deescalation of the medical process

"The hospital is a sequence of pavilions, each devoted to a particular disease. They are connected by a medical boulevard –a slow–moving belt that displays the sick in a continuous procession, with a group of dancing nurses in transparent uniforms, medical equipment disguised as totem poles, and rich perfumes that suppress the familiar stench of healing, in an almost festive atmosphere of operatic melodies.

Doctors select their patients from this belt, invite them to their individual pavilions, test their vitality, and almost playfully administer their (medical) knowledge. If they fail, the patient is returned to the conveyer; perhaps another doctor tries the patient, but it soon becomes apparent that the belt leads beyond the pavilions, through the cruciform building, and straight into the cemetery."

(Koolhaas, R., M. Vreisendorp, et al.)

Fig.1 – 9 Rem Koolhaas, Madelon Vreisendorp, Elia Zenghelis, and Zoe Zenghelis (1972). 'Exodus, or the voluntary prisoners of architecture'

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TAGS

1972appropriation • architectural sequence • arsenal • boulevardcemeterycollage • continuous procession • conveyer belt • cruciform • cut-outcut-out illustrationdancingdiseasedoctor • Elia Zenghelis • exodus • festive atmosphere • graphic style • healing • hospitalillustrationimaginary landscapes • Madelon Vreisendorp • medical boulevard • medical equipment • medical knowledge • medical process • melody • modern healing • nurseoperationpatientpavilionperfumephotocollagephotomontageplayful • prisoners of architecture • radical deescalation • Rem Koolhaassequencespace-framespatial narrativesspeculative design • totem poles • uniform • urban speculation • vitality • Zoe Zenghelis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 MARCH 2011

General Practice Notebook: an online medical encyclopaedia

"GPnotebook is a concise synopsis of the entire field of clinical medicine focussed on the needs of the General Practitioner.

The database is continually being updated by a team of authors. We take a pragmatic approach to authoring: we look out for topical issues, keep track of the journals and update material in response to user feedback.

We use a range of knowledge sources, including clinical experience, knowledge taken from literature reviews, original research articles and guidelines published by national and international bodies. In many cases references are made to sources of information; we are committed to making GPnotebook fully referenced in the near future. As a team we review each other's work but we also rely in the feedback from experts in primary care and the various clinical specialities to keep us on the right track.

Our editorial decisions are based on merit and are not influenced by any funding bodies.

We make every effort to ensure that the contents of the site are correct however we cannot be held responsible for any errors or ommissions."

(Oxbridge Solutions Ltd., UK)

TAGS

body • clinical • clinical medicinedatabasediagnosisdiseasedoctorencyclopaediaexpert knowledge • general practitioner • GP • GP Notebook • guidelineshealthhuman patientsillnessinformationinjuryknowledge baseknowledge repositorymedicalmedical practice • medical reference • medical researchnotebook • online encyclopaedia • operationpainpractitioner • prevention • primary care • prognosis • public healthreferencerepositoryresearch findingssearchsearch enginesexual healthsufferingtherapytreatmentUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 OCTOBER 2003

Michel Foucault: Heterotopia

"The heterotopia is capable of juxtaposing in a single real place several spaces, several sites that are in themselves incompatible. [...] The garden is the smallest parcel of the world and then it is the totality of the world. The garden has been a sort of happy, universalizing heterotopia since the beginnings of antiquity (our modern zoological gardens spring from that source)"
(Michel Foucault)

This text, entitled 'Des Espace Autres,' and published by the French journal Architecture /Mouvement/ Continuité in October, 1984, was the basis of a lecture given by Michel Foucault in March 1967. Although not reviewed for publication by the author and thus not part of the official corpus of his work, the manuscript was released into the public domain for an exhibition in Berlin shortly before Michel Foucault's death. Translated from the French by Jay Miskowiec.

[A heterotopia in a medical context describes a situation where an organ's function is able to be re–inscribed. This may happen through relocation as in the case of skin grafts or re–purposed in the case of sex change operations. Foucault draws the distinction between utopias and heterotopia. According to him, utopias are abstracted perfected and fundamentally unreal spaces while heterotopia are places that simultaneously represent and contest all real sites that can be found within a culture.]

Fig. 1&2 Miraj Ahmed, Martin Jameson, Architectural Association Inc.

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