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Which clippings match 'Abstract Representation' keyword pg.1 of 1
18 APRIL 2014

Design conceptualisation through reverse engineering abstraction

"2.1 Abstraction Levels: An abstraction for a software artifact is a succinct description that suppresses the details that are unimportant to software developer and emphasizes the information that is important. For example, the abstraction provided by high level programming language allows a programmer to construct the algorithms without having to worry about the details of hardware register allocation. Software typically consists of several layers of abstraction built on top of raw hardware; the lowest–level software abstraction is object code, or machine code. Implementation is a common terminology for the lowest level of detail in an abstraction. When abstraction is applied to computer programming, program behavior is emphasized and implementation details are suppressed. The knowledge of a software product at various levels of abstraction undoubtedly underlies operations regarding the maintenance and reuses the existing software components. It is, therefore natural that there is a steadying growing interest in reverse engineering, as a capable of extracting information and documents from a software product to present in higher levels of abstraction than that of code. The abstraction as the process of ignoring certain details in order to simplify the problem and so facilitates the specification, design and implementation of a system to proceed in step–wise fashion. In the context of software maintenance [3], four levels of reverse engineering abstraction are defined: implementation abstraction, structural abstraction, functional abstraction and domain abstraction.

Implementation abstraction is a lowest level of abstraction and at this level the abstraction of the knowledge of the language in which the system is written, the syntax and semantics of language and the hierarchy of system components (program or module tree) rather then data structures and algorithms is abstracted. Structural abstraction level is a further abstraction of system components (program or modules) to extract the program structures, how the components are related and control to each other. Functional abstraction level is a higher abstraction level, it usually achieve by further abstraction of components or sub–components (programs or modules or class) to reveal the relations and logic, which perform certain tasks. Domain Abstraction further abstracts the functions by replacing its algorithmic nature with concepts and specific to the application domain."

(Nadim Asif, 2003)

Nadim Asif (2003). "Reverse Engineering Methodology to Recover the Design Artifacts: A Case Study". International Conference on Software Engineering Research and Practice, SERP '03 Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. Volume 2.

TAGS

2003abstract representation • abstraction layers • abstractions for problem solving • application domain • appropriately complex representation • conceptual hierarchy • conceptual organisation • conceptualisationdesign abstractiondesign conceptualisationdesign methodologydesign modeldesign problem • domain abstraction • functional abstractionhigh-level design • implementation abstraction • layers of abstraction • problem abstractionproblem-solvingrequirements engineeringreverse engineeringreverse engineering abstraction • Reverse Engineering Abstraction Methodology (REAM) • software abstraction • software artefact • software designsoftware engineeringsoftware modellingstructural abstraction • system components • system processes • systems theory

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 JULY 2006

Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats

"Six Thinking Hats is a simple, effective parallel thinking process that helps people be more productive, focused, and mindfully involved. And once learned, the tools can be applied immediately!

You and your team members can learn how to separate thinking into six clear functions and roles. Each thinking role is identified with a colored symbolic 'thinking hat.' By mentally wearing and switching 'hats,' you can easily focus or redirect thoughts, the conversation, or the meeting.

The White Hat calls for information known or needed. 'The facts, just the facts.' :: The Yellow Hat symbolizes brightness and optimism. Under this hat you explore the positives and probe for value and benefit. :: The Black Hat is judgment – the devil's advocate or why something may not work. Spot the difficulties and dangers :: where things might go wrong. Probably the most powerful and useful of the Hats but a problem if overused. :: The Red Hat signifies feelings, hunches and intuition. When using this hat you can express emotions and feelings and share fears, likes, dislikes, loves, and hates. :: The Green Hat focuses on creativity :: the possibilities, alternatives, and new ideas. It's an opportunity to express new concepts and new perceptions. :: The Blue Hat is used to manage the thinking process. It's the control mechanism that ensures the Six Thinking Hats guidelines are observed."

(The de Bono Group)

Edward De Bono (1985). "Six Thinking Hats", ISBN 0–316–17831–4.

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TAGS

ability to focusabstract representationabstract representationsabstraction • abstraction in problem solving and learning • abstractions for problem solving • alternatives • blackbluecolour • control mechanism • creativitydecision makingdesign methoddesign methodsdesign team • difficulties and dangers • distinct functions • distinct roles • Edward de Bonofactsfeelings • focus thoughts • green • group discussion • hat • hats • high performance thinkinghunches • individual thinking • intuitionjudgmentmethods for design practice • mindfully involved • new ideas • parallel thinking • parallel thinking process • possibilities • problem abstractionproblem-solvingproductivityred • redirect thoughts • role playingseparate thinkingSix Thinking Hatssymbolism • the facts • thinking • thinking hat • thinking process • thinking role • thinking tooltooltools for thinkingvalue and benefitways of thinking • wearing • whiteyellow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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