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19 JANUARY 2016

Love Punks: online game created by Australian Indigenous kids

"The Love Punks online game was created by a gang of 9,10 and 11 year old Love Punks from Roebourne in WA. For the last 8 months the Love Punks have been sweating it out, in 40 degree heat, on computers creating stop motion animations of themselves and friends in photoshop and flash."

(26 April 2012)

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2012 • 9-11 year olds • Aboriginal Australian kids • Aboriginal culture • Aboriginal kids • Adobe Flash • bearded dragon • Big hART • Burrup Peninsula • childhood imagination • Chynna Campbell • comic bookcommunity participatory projectcreative participationdesert • designers of the future • disadvantaged communitiesDIY • Duncan Gates • First Nations youthfroggame designgreen screenhomemade gamesimagineeringIndigenous Australiansindigenous community • indigenous games and play • Indigenous people • Indigenous young people • interactive comic • kids • lizard • Lovepunks Game • mining • mud flats • Murujuga • NEOMAD • online game • outdoor game • peacockpersonal empowerment • Pilbara desert • pogona • remote communities • Roebourne • salt flats • Satellite Sisters • sea • social arts • stop motion animationstop-frame animation • Stu Campbell • Telen Rodwell • Trevor Jamieson • video gamevideo games and Indigenous peopleWestern Australia • Woodside (natural gas company) • Yijala Yala Project • young designersyoung peoplezombie

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 SEPTEMBER 2011

Citizen science: predicting protein structures with a multiplayer online game

"People exert large amounts of problem–solving effort playing computer games. Simple image– and text–recognition tasks have been successfully 'crowd–sourced' through games, but it is not clear if more complex scientific problems can be solved with human–directed computing. Protein structure prediction is one such problem: locating the biologically relevant native conformation of a protein is a formidable computational challenge given the very large size of the search space. Here we describe Foldit, a multiplayer online game that engages non–scientists in solving hard prediction problems. Foldit players interact with protein structures using direct manipulation tools and user–friendly versions of algorithms from the Rosetta structure prediction methodology, while they compete and collaborate to optimize the computed energy. We show that top–ranked Foldit players excel at solving challenging structure refinement problems in which substantial backbone rearrangements are necessary to achieve the burial of hydrophobic residues. Players working collaboratively develop a rich assortment of new strategies and algorithms; unlike computational approaches, they explore not only the conformational space but also the space of possible search strategies. The integration of human visual problem–solving and strategy development capabilities with traditional computational algorithms through interactive multiplayer games is a powerful new approach to solving computationally–limited scientific problems."

(Seth Cooper, Firas Khatib, Adrien Treuille, Janos Barbero, Jeehyung Lee, Michael Beenen, Andrew Leaver–Fay, David Baker, Zoran Popović & Foldit players)

Nature 466, 756–760 (05 August 2010) doi:10.1038/nature09304 Received 22 January 2010 Accepted 30 June 2010

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algorithm • biochemistry • biomedicalcitizen sciencecollaboration • computational approaches • computational challenge • computer games • computing science • crowdsourcingdiscovery through designDNA • DNA sequence • Foldit • gamesimage recognitioninsight through designinteractive gamesmulti-player • multi-player online game • Nature (journal) • non-scientists • online gameplaying • predication • problem-solving • protein structure prediction • protein structures • scientific problems • scientists • structural biology • text recognitiontheory buildingvisual problem-solvingvisual representation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 FEBRUARY 2005

Escape From Woomera: Videogame Social Commentary

"A online game, being developed by an Australian collective of games developers, artists and activists. The game is designed as a direct critique of Australia's inhumane and barbaric detention centres which imprison asylum-seekers, while their applications for asylum are being processed. Many our imprisoned in Detention centres for many years. Many have died while being imprisoned.

Background - If you thought escaping from Castle Wolfenstein was hard, try Woomera Immigration Reception and Processing Centre in South Australia.

With a first person, 3D adventure game we invite gamers to assume the character of, and 'live' through the experiences of a modern day refugee.

The effective media lock-out from immigration detention centres has meant that the whole truth about what goes on behind the razor-wire at Woomera, Baxter, Port Hedland, Maribyrnong and Villawood remains largely a mystery to the Australian public. We want to challenge this by offering the world a glimpse - more than that even: an interactive, immersive experience - of life within the most secretive and controversial places on the Australian political and geographical landscape.

In this way, Escape From Woomera will be an engine for mobilising experiences and situations otherwise inaccessible to an nation of disempowered onlookers. It will provide both a portal and a toolkit for reworking and engaging with what is otherwise an entirely mediated current affair.

The videogame is the most rapidly evolving, exciting, subversive and feared cultural medium in the world today. It's akin to graffiti on the cultural landscape. As such it is ripe for an injection of interesting and progressive ideas that can effect social change. We are a team of game developers, digital artists and media professionals, committed to the videogame medium - not merely as a vehicle for conceptual new media art or profit-driven entertainment - but as a free, independent art form in its own right. The creation of Escape From Woomera is part of a larger goal: the rise of a counter-culture of developers and gamers who create and engage with game art outside the mainstream corporate industry."

(Honor Harger)

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2003 • 3D adventure game • Adelaide Immigration Transit Accommodation • adventure game • Ashmore Reef • asylum seeker • asylum seekersAustraliabarbaric practices • Baxter Immigration Reception and Processing Centre • Brisbane Immigration Transit Accommodation • Castle Wolfenstein • Christmas Island Immigration Reception and Processing Centre • citizenshipcivil liberties • Cocos Island Contingency Reception Centre • controlcontroversial practicescritical positioncritiquecritique of ideologycritique of power • Curtin Immigration Reception and Processing Centre • Darwin Alternative Places of Detention • detainee • detention centre • detention centres • escape • Escape from Woomera (2003) • first-person point-and-click game • game mod • game prototype • gameplaygovernment policyHalf-Life (video game)Honor Harger • human rights abuses • immigration control • inhumane treatment • interactive immersive experience • Inverbrackie Alternative Places of Detention • Iranian • Leonora Alternative Place of Detention • Manus Island Regional Processing Centre • Maribyrnong Immigration Detention Centre • media blackout • mediated current affair • Melbourne Immigration Transit Accommodation • Mustafa (character) • Nauru Detention Centre • Northern Immigration Detention Centre • online game • Perth Immigration Detention Centre • Perth Immigration Residential Housing • playable prototype • point and click adventure video game • point-and-click adventure game • political action • Port Augusta Immigration Residential Housing • Port Hedland Immigration Reception and Processing Centre • prisonprisonerpublic accountability • razor-wire • realistic depiction • refugee • request for asylum • Scherger Immigration Detention Centre • South Australia • Sydney Immigration Residential Housing • unethical behaviour • unfinished prototype • vaporwarevideo game • Villawood Immigration Detention Centre • Wickham Point Immigration Detention Centre • Woomera • Woomera Immigration Reception and Processing Centre • Yongah Hill (Northam) Immigration Detention Centre
14 NOVEMBER 2003

Will Wright: The Sims On-line

An on–line game where players are able to determine the lives of virtual people (sims) and interact with other on–line players. Players manage their sims through setting their virtual careers and relationships.

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