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20 JULY 2014

Choreographed Typography by Hyun Ju Song and Mi Lyoung Bae

"Created by Hyun Ju Song and Mi Lyoung Bae, The Moment is an exploration of language, how the meaning is formed from words. Hyun Ju Song describes a situation when people face an absurd situation in Korea, they say 'It makes no word.' This project is about the absurd moment and creates no word out of words."

(Filip Visnjic, 12/02/2014, CreativeApplications.Net)

Hyun Ju Song and Mi Lyoung Bae (2013). "The Moment", Concept, visual programming & performance by Song, Hyun Ju, Sound programming & performance by Bae, Mi Lyoung. A generative design work where the Latin alphabet is transformed into abstract geometry using 3–screen–projection, Processing and Max/MSP.

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2013 • abstract geometry • alphabet • animated text • audiovisual experienceaudiovisual performanceblack and white • CreativeApplications.Net • disassemblegenerative design • Hyun Ju Song • Korean artist • Latin alphabet • Latin wordlegibilityletterformlive animationlive audiovisual performanceMax/MSPmedia artist • Mi Lyoung Bae • moving typeProcessing (software)projection worksrealtime animationsound design • sound programming • soundscape • The Moment (2013) • typo art projecttypographytypography experimentsvisual interpretation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2014

The Adventure of English: the evolution of the English language

"The Adventure of English is a British television series (ITV) on the history of the English presented by Melvyn Bragg as well as a companion book, also written by Bragg. The series ran in 2003.

The series and the book are cast as an adventure story, or the biography of English as if it were a living being, covering the history of the language from its modest beginnings around 500 AD as a minor Germanic dialect to its rise as a truly established global language.

In the television series, Bragg explains the origins and spelling of many words based on the times in which they were introduced into the growing language that would eventually become modern English."

[Complete eight part series available on YouTube distributed by Maxwell's collection Pty Limited, Australia]

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2002 • A Dictionary of the English Language • American English • American Spelling Book • Anglo-SaxonArabicaristocracyAustraliaAustralian Aborigineauthoritative historyBible • Blue Backed Speller • British televisionCaribbean • Catherine of Aragon • Celtic language • Celts • Church of England • cockney rhyming slang • colonisationcommon languagecommunication • Convicts land • dialectdictionaryDutch • educated people • English languageEsperantoFrenchFrench languageFrisian • Frisian language • Gaelic • Germanic rootsgrammarGreek • Gullah language • Hebrew • Henry V of England • Henry VIII of England • historical eventshistoryhistory of ideas • History of the English language • history of useimmigrationIndiaindustrial revolutioninvasionIsaac NewtonITVJamaicanJane Austen • John Cheke • John WycliffeJonathan Swift • Joseph McCoy • Katherine Duncan-Jones • King James I • languagelanguage developmentLatin wordlinguisticsmedieval churchMelvyn Braggmini-series • modern English • Netherlands • Noah Webster • North America • Old English • peasant • Philip Sidne • pidgin • pronunciation • Queen Elizabeth I • Robert Burns • Rural Rides • Samuel JohnsonSanskritScotland • Scottish language • scripture • spelling • Squanto • television series • The Adventure of English (2002) • theologian • Thomas Sheridan • United Statesuse of wordsvikingvocabulary • Websters Dictionary • West Africa • William Cobbett • William Jones • William Shakespeare • William the Conqueror • William Tyndale • William Wordsworth • words

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 SEPTEMBER 2012

After 35 Years, Voyager Nears Edge of Solar System

"Tucked aboard each Voyager spacecraft was a 12–inch, gold–plated, copper phonograph disc 'containing sounds and images selected to portray the diversity of life and culture on Earth,' according to NASA.

Below is a sampling of the 115 images and audio clips, selected by a committee chaired by Carl Sagan. The images were encoded in analog form. The audio was designed to be played at 16 2/3 rpm; a needle, cartridge and symbolic instructions for using the record were also included."

(Nell Greenfieldboyce, 12 September 2012, NPR)

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197720th century • Ann Druyan • Carl Sagan • Cornell Universitydeep space probeeating behaviours • extraterrestrial intelligence • golden record • golden records • greetings • immortalise • interstellar probe • Jimmy Carter • Kurt Waldheim • Latin word • morse code • NASANational Aeronautics and Space AdministrationNPRPioneer 10 • Pioneer plaque • probesalutationsolar system • Sounds of Earth • spacespace exploration • space probe • Terrestrialtime capsule • Voyager 1 • Voyager 2 • Voyager Golden Record

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MAY 2012

Ampers-Fan: the history of the ampersand

"The dark horse of the keyboard, the ampersand exists to join things together, yet remains set apart. Whilst everyone can read and understand the ampersand, or the & symbol, how many of us know where it came from?

Alistair Sooke traces the history of the funny little character that has quietly given joy to so many, from a bored medieval scribe right the way through to a modern day digital font designer. Delighting type designers throughout the centuries as a chance within a font to create a small piece of art, it is a joyful moment in a functional resource. Speaking to Ampersfans Alastair enters into a world of letterpress, punchcutting and typography and discovers how the ampersand can be found at every step of the way, bringing a joyful flick of a tail to the dullest document.

If you thought the ampersand was a bright young thing in the world of type, you couldn't be more wrong; first credited to Marcus Tiro around 63 BC, combing the letters e and t from the Latin word 'et'. Fighting off competition from his nemesis, the 'Tironian Mark', Alastair then tracks the ampersand to 16th Century Paris where it was modelled in the hands of type designer to the King, Claude Garamond, then back across the sea to William Caslon's now famous interpretation, designed with a joyful array of flourishes and swirls. Alastair will discover how the ampersand became a calling card for many typographers, showcasing some of their best and most creative work.

A simple twist of the pen, the ampersand has managed to captivate its audience since print began, in Ampersfan Alistair tries to pin down this slippery character down once and for all."

(BBC Radio 4 Programmes, 2012)

Alistair Sooke (2012). "Ampers–Fan", Producer: : Jo Meek & Gillian Donovan, A Sparklab Production for BBC Radio 4, Last broadcast on Monday, 16:00 on BBC Radio 4.

TAGS

16th century • 63 BC • Alistair Sooke • Ampers-Fan • ampersand • BBC Radio 4Bodleian Library • Claude Garamond • digital font designer • e and t • esperluette • et • European Renaissancefont • functional resource • Garamond • history of type • interpretationJan TschicholdJohannes GutenbergLatin wordletterformletterpress • ligature • Marcus Tiro • medievalParis • punchcutting • symbol • Tironian Mark • twist of the pen • type • type designer • type designerstypefacetypography • William Caslon • world of type

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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