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Which clippings match 'Constructed Identities' keyword pg.1 of 2
29 OCTOBER 2017

Michael Glassco: Contested images: the politics and poetics of appropriation

"The dissertation traces the tactics of appropriation of Barbara Kruger, The Billboard Liberation Front and Shepard Fairey as exemplars of transgression and commodification within the changing commercial conditions of neo-liberalism. Their works, tactics and strategies are emphasized as points of insight into the practices and conditions of subversion as well as the limits of hegemonic containment that reproduces the political and economic structure within which they operated. The dissertation furthers and contributes to the theoretical and methodology of critical cultural studies as it emphasizes the role of the economy and ideology in reproducing the prevailing hegemonic order. Critical cultural studies hinges on the concepts of hegemony as lived discursive and ideological struggles over meaning and communication resources within historically specific and socially structured contexts. This framework emphasizes the poetics of appropriation - the use, meaning and spaces of articulation of visual representations with the politics - the socio-economic and discursive conditions that reproduce the dominant social order."

(Michael Glassco, 2012, University of Iowa)

TAGS

2012activismAdbustersadvertising hijacking • advertising imagery • advertising messages • appropriated images • appropriation activists • appropriation artists • appropriation practices • appropriation tactics • Barbara Kruger • Billboard Liberation Front • bricoleur • Buy Nothing Day • co-optioncommodificationconstructed identitiesconsumption spectaclecritical cultural hijacking • critical cultural studies • critique in public spaces • critique power • culture jammingdiscursive struggles • fauxvertising • graphic agitator • guerrilla artGuerrilla Girlsguerrilla tactics • hegemonic containment • hegemony • ideological struggle • ideological systems • ideological warfare • images of appropriation • institutionalised art • Jenny Holzer • manufacturing identity • media hijacking • Michael Glassco • neoliberalismparticipatory engagement • pastiche of visual codes • PhD thesis • poetics of appropriation • political protest • prevailing hegemonic order • privatisation of culture • public space • rebellious bricoleur • revolutionary subjects • Robbie Conal • Rosemary Coombe • Shepard Fairey • sublimating desire • subversionsubvertisements • subvertising • systematic asymmetries of power • tactic of dissent • tactical strikes • tactics of appropriation • tactics of guerrilla semiotics • The Billboard Liberation Front • transgression • TV Turn off Week • un-commercials • unequal access to cultural resources • University of Iowavisual codesvisual representation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 OCTOBER 2017

Ideologies address people and offer them a particular identity

"Interpellation is the process by which ideological systems call out to social subjects and tell them their place in the system. In popular culture, it refers to the ways that cultural products address their consumers and recruit them into a particular ideological position. Interpellation is a concept in Marxist social and political theory associated in particular with the work of the philosopher Louis Althusser.

Interpellation draws on the theory that the notion of the autonomous, fully coherent and actualised human subject is an illusion, an ideological construction meant to further the agendas of capitalism and liberal humanism."

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attitudesconstructed identitiesconstruction of normscultural ideas • cultural notions • hailing • identityideological message • Ideological State Apparatuses (ISA) • ideologies address people • ideologyinterpellationLouis Althussermanufacturing consent • Repressive State Apparatuses (RSA) • social norms • social processes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2014

Haul girls: identity performance through brand consumption and endorsement

"Helina is explaining what a haul girl is to me. 'Basically, you go out shopping for clothes or beauty products,' she says, 'then you make a haul video and show viewers on YouTube what you got. You go through the items of clothing one by one. I guess what people get out of them is not showing off, like, how much money you've got or anything, but lifestyle: you get to see how one person lives, what their taste is.'

If you're minded to sneer at a youth cult that involves making videos about your shopping, then Helina has a pretty intriguing counter–argument. 'It's not just about showing what you've got,' she says. 'It's a whole creative process behind the videos as well, which is what I enjoy about it. Choosing the right music, going from the filming to the editing. Sometimes I even storyboard things, because I want certain shots, how I can present different items and things like that.' Besides, she says, it's a genuine community. She thinks a lot of haul girls 'turn the camera on because it's a way to talk to people without having to go outside and face their fears. I know that was the case with me: I turned on my camera because I was at home, signed off work, sick, and really bored. And it helped with my confidence in a way. There's this community where you can talk to like–minded people.'"

(Alexis Petridis, 20 March 2014, The Guardian)

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TAGS

2014affective consumptionaffective goal achievementamateur cultural productionASOSbeauty products • Boohoo • Boots (shop) • brand awareness • clothes shopping • commodificationcommodity fetishismconstructed identitiesconsumer aestheticsconsumer brandsconsumer cultureconsumer endorsementconsumption spectaclecultural materialismcultural monoculturedigital narcissism • haul girl • haul video • I shop therefore I amidentity performancelifestyle • Missguided (shop) • new media content productiononline communityonline followersperformativitypersonal tastepost-feminist agenda • Primark • product endorsementrecommender culture • retail therapy • shopping for clothes • show and tellspectacular societysubculturetaste formationsThe Guardianunboxingvideo blogger • whats in my bag (video) • whats in my purse (video) • YouTube • Zara (shop)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 FEBRUARY 2014

Identity performance: YouTubers, real-life dolls and cosplayers

Fig.1 "My Strange Addiction: I'm a Living Doll", TLC, Season 5 (2014), original air date 1 January 2014.

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2014Barbie dollbelongingbody modificationcelebrity • china doll • china figurine • commodity fetishismcompulsive behaviourconstructed identitiesconsumer aestheticscosplay • cosplayer • digital narcissismdolldoll fetishism • doll-like features • dollificationdress-up • Emily Smith • escapismexhibitionismfadfamefantasy characterfashionable fadfetishismidentity performanceimpression management • Justin Jedlica • living dolllolitamediated representationmimicry • My Strange Addiction (TV Series) • online behaviouronline followersperformativitypersonapersonal identityplastic surgeryreal-life dollrole playingsensationalismspectacular societysuperficial appearance • TLC (TV network) • Venus Isabelle Palermo • Victoriana • video bloggervisual depictionYouTubers

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 SEPTEMBER 2013

Holiday Inn Express: ad illustrates split between real/online identities

"Intercontinental Hotels Group (IHG) is launching the first UK television advertisement for Holiday Inn Express to raise awareness of the added value services that differentiate the brand in the crowded mid–priced hotel market."

(Russell Parsons, 9 September 2013, Marketing Week)

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2013added value • added value services • brand differentiation • breakfast • business traveller • Centaur Communications Ltd • comparisonconstructed identitiesdigital identity • Holiday Inn Express • hotel • hotel market • Intercontinental Hotels Group (IHG) • leisure industriesliving digital lives • Marketing Week (site) • mid-price market • online and offlineonline and real world identities • pastel shades • Premier Inn • price point • social media identitiessplit-screen • toothbrush • tv adUKUSPWiFi

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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