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Which clippings match 'Pictures Under Glass' keyword pg.1 of 1
18 SEPTEMBER 2013

Window shopping with Kate Spade Saturday's touchscreen storefront

"Kate Spade Saturday has taken up residence in New York with four pop–up digital stores appearing as window fronts around the city. ... Standing in front of the window, shoppers can click to explore looks, opt to buy them via PayPal, and best of all have them delivered with an hour to wherever they are in the city thanks to a partnership with eBay. Security also isn't a concern–despite being a giant screen, the initiative doesn't ask for credit card information or your address for every other passerby to see, instead texting you with a link that leads you to your window shop bag on your own phone instead."

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TAGS

2013 • 24hr shopping • click to exploreclothing companyclothing retailer • designer brand • digital storefront • digitally enhanced pop-up shop • eBayfuture interfacesglassyhaptic interfacein-personinteraction designinteractive display • interactive touchscreen • Kate Spade • Kate Spade New York (designer brand) • Kate Spade Saturday (clothing label) • m-commerceNew Yorknon-place • PayPal • pictures under glass • pop-up digital store • pop-up shopprogrammed useretail spaceretail storesingle-minded spaces • store window • storefronttouchscreen • touchscreen storefront • visual facade • William McComb • window display • window front • window shopping

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 APRIL 2012

Pictures Under Glass: sacrificing tactile richness

"As it happens, designing Future Interfaces For The Future used to be my line of work. I had the opportunity to design with real working prototypes, not green screens and After Effects, so there certainly are some interactions in the video which I'm a little skeptical of, given that I've actually tried them and the animators presumably haven't. But that's not my problem with the video.

My problem is the opposite, really – this vision, from an interaction perspective, is not visionary. It's a timid increment from the status quo, and the status quo, from an interaction perspective, is actually rather terrible. ...

I'm going to talk about that neglected third factor, human capabilities. What people can do. Because if a tool isn't designed to be used by a person, it can't be a very good tool, right? ...

Do you see what everyone is interacting with? The central component of this Interactive Future? It's there in every photo! That's right! – HANDS. And that's great! I think hands are fantastic! Hands do two things. They are two utterly amazing things, and you rely on them every moment of the day, and most Future Interaction Concepts completely ignore both of them. Hands feel things, and hands manipulate things.

Go ahead and pick up a book. Open it up to some page. Notice how you know where you are in the book by the distribution of weight in each hand, and the thickness of the page stacks between your fingers. Turn a page, and notice how you would know if you grabbed two pages together, by how they would slip apart when you rub them against each other.

Go ahead and pick up a glass of water. Take a sip. Notice how you know how much water is left, by how the weight shifts in response to you tipping it.

Almost every object in the world offers this sort of feedback. It's so taken for granted that we're usually not even aware of it. Take a moment to pick up the objects around you. Use them as you normally would, and sense their tactile response – their texture, pliability, temperature; their distribution of weight; their edges, curves, and ridges; how they respond in your hand as you use them.

There's a reason that our fingertips have some of the densest areas of nerve endings on the body. This is how we experience the world close–up. This is how our tools talk to us. The sense of touch is essential to everything that humans have called 'work' for millions of years.

Now, take out your favorite Magical And Revolutionary Technology Device. Use it for a bit. What did you feel? Did it feel glassy? Did it have no connection whatsoever with the task you were performing?

I call this technology Pictures Under Glass. Pictures Under Glass sacrifice all the tactile richness of working with our hands, offering instead a hokey visual facade."

(Bret Victor, 8 November 2011)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2012

The Future of the Book: design speculation

"The Future of the Book is a design exploration of digital reading that seeks to identify new opportunities for readers, publishers, and authors to discover, consume, and connect in different formats.

As more people consume pages in pixels, IDEO designers wondered why we continue to discover and consume the written word through the old analog, page–turning model. We asked: what happens when the reading experience catches up with new technologies?

The team looked at how digital and analog books currently are being read, shared and collected, as well as at trends, business models and consumer behavior within related fields. We identified three distinct opportunities – new narratives, social reading with richer context, and providing tools for critical thinking – and developed a design concept around each one.

The first concept, 'Alice,' turns storytelling on its head by making narratives non–linear and participatory. With Alice, the story world starts bleeding into the everyday life of the reader. Real–world challenges, like acting on a phone call from the lead character, or participating in photo based scavenger hunts, unlock new aspects of the story, and turn other readers into collaborators or competitors. Alice is a platform for authors to experiment with narratives, to allow their stories to transcend media, and to engage fans in the storytelling process.

The second concept, 'Coupland,' makes book discovery a social activity by allowing readers to build shared libraries and hear about additional texts through existing networks. Coupland makes it easy for busy professionals to stay on top of industry must–reads. Businesses can assign book budgets to their employees and build collective libraries through a group–licensing model. Personal recommendations, aggregation of reading patterns, and the ability to follow inspiring individuals and groups help ensure that Coupland users always are tapped into the latest essential content within and outside of the organization.

The third concept, 'Nelson,' connects books to commentary, critique, and contextual information, letting readers explore a topic from multiple perspectives. Nelson reinforces the role of books as carriers of knowledge and insight. Readers can explore polarizing material and see whose word currently has the greatest impact on popular opinion and debate. Layers of connected commentary, news, and fact–checking augment the core book content – providing greater context and encouraging debate and scrutiny.

Each concept features a simple, accessible storytelling format and a particular look and feel. We believe that digital technology creates possibilities, so our solutions truly adapt to the new environment, rather than emulate analog qualities onscreen. For example, we resisted any temptation to move books closer to the bite–sized character of other digital media, because longhand writing encourages immersion (deep reading) and reflection."

(IDEO, 2010)

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TAGS

2010Alice in Wonderlandanalogue bookbooks • collective libraries • connected commentary • consumer behaviour • contextual information • convergence • deep reading • design concept • design exploration • different formats • digital booksdigital mediadigital readingdigital technology • Douglas Coupland • end of printenvisioningformatfuture of the bookgo digitalhybrid formIDEO • inspiring individuals • intertwingularity • longhand writing • look and feelmedia formsmultiple perspectives • must-reads • narrative • new narratives • new opportunitiesnew technologiesnon-linearoff the pagepage-turning model • pages in pixels • personal recommendation • pictures under glass • reader • readersreading experience • reading patterns • rich context • shared libraries • social activity • social readingspeculative designstorystorytellingstorytelling formattechnology convergenceTed Nelsonthe future of the booktrendswritten word

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2009

Parody of MS Surface Promotion

"Sadly, with my current rate of savings I won't be able to afford the 10 grand sticker price until my kids are out of diapers and my wife and I are in them. So I decided to parody it instead."
('Doc', SarcasticGamer)

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TAGS

convergenceculture jammingdevicehaptic deviceinteraction designinteractive surfaceinteractive tableinterfaceiPhonemash-upMicrosoft SurfaceMS Surfaceparodypictures under glassremix culture • SarcasticGamer • tabletechnology • unimaginative use of new technology • usability

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MARCH 2009

Microsoft Surface: interaction through tabletop device

"Microsoft Surface turns an ordinary tabletop into a vibrant, interactive surface. It's the first commercially–available surface computing platform from Microsoft. The product provides effortless access to digital content through natural gestures, touch and physical objects. Today, it's a 30–inch diagonal display in a table–like form factor that's easy for individuals or multiple people to interact with in a way that feels familiar, just like in the real world. In essence, it's a surface come to life for exploring, learning, sharing, creating, buying and much more. Today Microsoft Surface is available in the retail, hospitality, automotive, banking and healthcare industries. Consumers can interact with Surface at select AT&T retail locations, at the iBar located in the Rio All Suite Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas and at select Sheratons in the U.S."
(Microsoft Corporation)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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