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27 NOVEMBER 2015

100 Women 2015: Life for women in Islamic State's Raqqa

"Nour is a woman from Raqqa, the so-called Islamic State's (IS) capital inside Syria. She managed to escape the city and is now a refugee in Europe, where she met up with the BBC. This story is based on her experiences and those of her two sisters, who are still inside the IS-held city. Names and the timings of some events have been changed to avoid compromising the safety of Nour or her family."

(BBC News, 2015)

Video produced by Vladimir Hernandez, Faisal Irshaid and Najlaa Aboumerhi. Animation by Luis Ruibal.

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2015asylum seekersautonomy • BBC 100 Women • BBC News • burka • burkha • burqa • civil liberties • cleric • clothing • concealment of the face • control societycruel mendaeshdignity • draconian law • dress code • face • face covering • face-covering • Faisal Irshaid • flagellation • flogging • freedoms • full face veil • gender inequality • harsh penalties • headgear • hesba • hyena • inspirational stories • life for women • Luis Ruibal • Najlaa Aboumerhi • niqab • oppression • perversion • punishment • Raqqa • refugeereligious fundamentalism • religious police • so-called Islamic State • subjugation • subordinate womenSyriaveil • Vladimir Hernandez • whipping • womens clothing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JULY 2014

Jewish Voice for Peace: Israel/Palestine 101

Fig.1 short animated introduction to Israel–Palestine situation created by Jewish Voice for Peace.

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1937194719482D animationautonomyawareness raisingbelligerencecivil libertiesconflictcontested state • David Ben-Gurion • demolition • expropriation • fertile landGaza StripGeneva conventionhegemonyhistoryhistory of conflicthuman rights violationideological intoleranceillegal behaviour • illegal settlement • indignities • international community • international consensus • IsraelIsraeli-Palestinian conflictJewish peopleJewish settlers • Jewish state • Jewish Voice for Peace • Middle Eastmilitarized resistance movements • military force • militia • nationhood • occupied territory • occupying powerownershipPalestine • Palestinian Arabs • Palestinian territories • partition • partition plan • peace • Peel partition plan • Peel plan • polemic • protestrefugeerespectRonald Reagansegregationsettlement • sovereign states • sovereigntyState of IsraelState of Palestineterritorial bordersterritorialisationterritorytoleranceUnited NationsUnited Stateswallwarwar over water • West Bank • Zionist

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MARCH 2014

7th grade student: Welcome to My PLE!

"Seventh grade life science student gives a tour of her personal learning environment. Design based research project was conducted for Networked Student dissertation."

(Wendy Drexler, 2009)

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2009 • 7th grade • autonomy • box jellyfish • connectivism • design based research project • e-learning 2.0e-pedagogyeducational technologyelearning • Evernote • FacebookGlogster EDUGoogle Docs • iGoogle • learner responsibility • learning teachnology • leopard gecko • life science • Netvibes • networked student • PageFlakes • paperless • peer-reviewed • personal learning centres • Personal Learning EnvironmentPLE • Pocket Tanks • reflective bloggingscience education • seventh grade • Skype • structured enquiry • studentSymbalooEDUteaching science • Wendy Drexler

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 FEBRUARY 2014

An Introduction to the Federated Social Network

"To understand how federated social networking would be an improvement, we should understand how online social networking essentially works today. Right now, when you sign up for Facebook, you get a Facebook profile, which is a collection of data about you that lives on Facebook's servers. You can add words and pictures to your Facebook profile, and your Facebook profile can have a variety of relationships – it can be friends with other Facebook profiles, it can be a 'fan' of another Facebook page, or 'like' a web page containing a Facebook widget. Crucially, if you want to interact meaningfully with anyone else's Facebook profile or any application offered on the Facebook platform, you have to sign up with Facebook and conduct your online social networking on Facebook's servers, and according to Facebook's rules and preferences. (You can replace 'Facebook' with 'Orkut,' 'LinkedIn,' 'Twitter,' and essentially tell the same story.)

We've all watched the dark side of this arrangement unfold, building a sad catalog of the consequences of turning over data to a social networking company. The social networking company might cause you to overshare information that you don't want shared, or might disclose your information to advertisers or the government, harming your privacy. And conversely, the company may force you to undershare by deleting your profile, or censoring information that you want to see make it out into the world, ultimately curbing your freedom of expression online. And because the company may do this, governments might attempt to require them to do it, sometimes even without asking or informing the end–user.

How will federated social networks be different? The differences begin with the code behind online social networking. The computer code that gives you a Facebook profile is built in a closed way – it's proprietary and kept relatively secret by Facebook, so you have to go through Facebook to create, maintain, and interact with Facebook profiles or applications.

But federated social network developers are doing two things differently in order to build a new ecosystem. First, the leading federated social networking software is open–source: that means that anybody can download the source code, and use it to create and maintain social networking profiles for themselves and others. Second, the developers are simultaneously collaborating on a new common language, presumably seeking an environment where most or even all federated social networking profiles can talk to one another.

What will that likely mean in practice? To join a federated social network, you'll be able to choose from an array of 'profile providers,' just like you can choose an email provider. You will even be able to set up your own server and provide your social networking profile yourself. And in a federated social network, any profile can talk to another profile – even if it's on a different server.

Imagine the Web as an open sea. To use Facebook, you have to immigrate to Facebook Island and get a Facebook House, in a land with a single ruler. But the distributed social networks being developed now will allow you to choose from many islands, connected to one another by bridges, and you can even have the option of building your own island and your own bridges."

(Richard Esguerra, 21 March 21 2011, Electronic Frontier Foundation)

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2011abstraction layeragency of access and engagementautonomy • centralised infrastructure • centralised platformcommon interfaceComputer Supported Cooperative Work • content distribution networks • data contextdecentralisation • decentralised architecture • decentralised infrastructure • distributed ecosystemdistributed models • distributed social network • Distributed Social Networking (DOSN) • distributed social networks • distributed systemElectronic Frontier Foundation • Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP) • Facebook • Federated Social Networks (FSN) • Google Wave Federation Protocol • hCard • information ecosysteminteroperabilityknowledge commonsLinkedInlocalisationmultiplatform • OAuth • Online Social Networks (OSN) • open architecture • open protocol • Open Stack • open standardsOpenID • OpenSocial • Orkut • OStatus • peer-to-peer exchange • Portable Contacts (open protocol) • social network aggregation services • software portability • structural abstraction • system scalability • technology integrationTwitter • user application data • user autonomy • Wave Federation Protocol • web feeds • web services • XFN • XRD

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 FEBRUARY 2014

University of Mary Washington's project: A Domain of One's Own

"A Domain of One's Own is a project at the University of Mary Washington managed by the Division of Teaching and Learning Technologies. Starting in fall 2013, the project allows UMW students, faculty, and staff to register their own domain name and associate it with a space on a UMW–managed Web server. In that Web space, users will have the opportunity and flexibility to design and create spaces of almost unlimited possibilities. Within the system, they may install LAMP–compatible Web applications, set up subdomains and email addresses, and install databases. In addition, users may choose to 'map' their domain (or a subdomain) to other services, such as a UMW Blogs, Google Sites, or Tumblr."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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