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19 JANUARY 2016

Love Punks: online game created by Australian Indigenous kids

"The Love Punks online game was created by a gang of 9,10 and 11 year old Love Punks from Roebourne in WA. For the last 8 months the Love Punks have been sweating it out, in 40 degree heat, on computers creating stop motion animations of themselves and friends in photoshop and flash."

(26 April 2012)

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TAGS

2012 • 9-11 year olds • Aboriginal Australian kids • Aboriginal culture • Aboriginal kids • Adobe Flash • bearded dragon • Big hART • Burrup Peninsula • childhood imagination • Chynna Campbell • comic bookcommunity participatory projectcreative participationdesert • designers of the future • disadvantaged communitiesDIY • Duncan Gates • First Nations youthfroggame designgreen screenhomemade gamesimagineeringIndigenous Australiansindigenous community • indigenous games and play • Indigenous people • Indigenous young people • interactive comic • kids • lizard • Lovepunks Game • mining • mud flats • Murujuga • NEOMAD • online game • outdoor game • peacockpersonal empowerment • Pilbara desert • pogona • remote communities • Roebourne • salt flats • Satellite Sisters • sea • social arts • stop motion animationstop-frame animation • Stu Campbell • Telen Rodwell • Trevor Jamieson • video gamevideo games and Indigenous peopleWestern Australia • Woodside (natural gas company) • Yijala Yala Project • young designersyoung peoplezombie

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 NOVEMBER 2012

Immortals: visual effects spectacular epic

Immortals is a "2011 3D action–adventure fantasy film directed by Tarsem Singh and starring Henry Cavill, Freida Pinto, and Mickey Rourke. The film was previously named Dawn of War and War of the Gods before being officially named Immortals and is loosely based on the Greek myth of Theseus and the Minotaur and the Titanomachy."

(movieclipsTRAILERS, 17 August 2011, YouTube)

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TAGS

2011action-adventure • Ares • Athenacostume designCrete • Daniel Sharman • Dawn of War • Demeter • digital 3D • Eiko Ishioka • epic spectacular • Epirus Bow • fantasticfantasy filmfictional worldfilm • Freida Pinto • gods • Greek myth • green screen • Henry Cavill • Heracles • Hyperion • Immortals • Immortals (film) • Isabel Lucas • John Hurt • legendary weapon • Mickey Rourke • Minotaur • mythmythologicalmythological being • Olympians • oracle • Phaedra • Poseidon • RealD 3D • Relativity Media • revengeSFXspecial effectsspectacular • Stephen Dorff • Tarsem Singh • Tartarus • Theseus • Titan Hyperion • Titanomachy • Titans • Universal Pictures • VFXvisual effectsvisual spectaclevisual spectacularvisual spectacular epic • War of the Gods • world of the storyZeus

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 APRIL 2012

Pictures Under Glass: sacrificing tactile richness

"As it happens, designing Future Interfaces For The Future used to be my line of work. I had the opportunity to design with real working prototypes, not green screens and After Effects, so there certainly are some interactions in the video which I'm a little skeptical of, given that I've actually tried them and the animators presumably haven't. But that's not my problem with the video.

My problem is the opposite, really – this vision, from an interaction perspective, is not visionary. It's a timid increment from the status quo, and the status quo, from an interaction perspective, is actually rather terrible. ...

I'm going to talk about that neglected third factor, human capabilities. What people can do. Because if a tool isn't designed to be used by a person, it can't be a very good tool, right? ...

Do you see what everyone is interacting with? The central component of this Interactive Future? It's there in every photo! That's right! – HANDS. And that's great! I think hands are fantastic! Hands do two things. They are two utterly amazing things, and you rely on them every moment of the day, and most Future Interaction Concepts completely ignore both of them. Hands feel things, and hands manipulate things.

Go ahead and pick up a book. Open it up to some page. Notice how you know where you are in the book by the distribution of weight in each hand, and the thickness of the page stacks between your fingers. Turn a page, and notice how you would know if you grabbed two pages together, by how they would slip apart when you rub them against each other.

Go ahead and pick up a glass of water. Take a sip. Notice how you know how much water is left, by how the weight shifts in response to you tipping it.

Almost every object in the world offers this sort of feedback. It's so taken for granted that we're usually not even aware of it. Take a moment to pick up the objects around you. Use them as you normally would, and sense their tactile response – their texture, pliability, temperature; their distribution of weight; their edges, curves, and ridges; how they respond in your hand as you use them.

There's a reason that our fingertips have some of the densest areas of nerve endings on the body. This is how we experience the world close–up. This is how our tools talk to us. The sense of touch is essential to everything that humans have called 'work' for millions of years.

Now, take out your favorite Magical And Revolutionary Technology Device. Use it for a bit. What did you feel? Did it feel glassy? Did it have no connection whatsoever with the task you were performing?

I call this technology Pictures Under Glass. Pictures Under Glass sacrifice all the tactile richness of working with our hands, offering instead a hokey visual facade."

(Bret Victor, 8 November 2011)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 SEPTEMBER 2010

Performance Capture using OptiTrack

"Motion Capture can provide amazingly natural motions to animated characters and special effects, but has traditionally required extensive setup and training, and multiple operators to be present during the capture session. With ARENA, a single user can be both the operator and actor, allowing unprecedented flexibility."

(NaturalPoint, 2010)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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