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02 FEBRUARY 2016

After Accelerationism: The Xenofeminist Manifesto

"Xenofeminism is gender-abolitionist...Let a hundred sexes bloom! ...[And, let's] construct a society where traits currently assembled under the rubric of gender, no longer furnish a grid for the asymmetric operation of power… You're not exploited or oppressed because you are a wage labourer or poor; you are a labourer or poor because you are exploited..."

(The Laboria Cuboniks collective, 11 June 2015, &&& Journal)

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TAGS

2015 • accelerationism • alien future • alienationalternative visions • aporias of difference • artificial wombs • becomingbody politicsbrave new world • class exclusion • counterculturecritical reinterpretationcyberfeminismdehumanisationdystopian futureearly 21st century • emancipatory potential of technology • exclusionfeminism • foundationalism • freedom from • freedom to • futuristic visiongender politics • gender-abolitionist • groundless universalism • human sexual experience • identity politicsImmanuel Kant • Laboria Cuboniks (collective) • liminalitymanifestomathematical abstractionmeaning-contextsmediated representationmutant sciencenetwork society • Nicolas Bourbaki • nodes of collective agreement • objective realityporous boundaries • prometheanism • protean ambition • race exclusion • radical recomposition • rationalityreterritorialisationselfhood • sexes • state of alienation • synthetic hormones • techno-utopiatechnoculture • technological alienation • transect • transfeminist perspective • transfeminist political project • transgender • transits • transmodernity • transtemporal • visions of the future • xenofeminism • xenofeminist • xenofeminist manifesto • XFM

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MARCH 2013

Mathematics is the foundation of activities such as knitting, stitching, measuring and cutting that are crucial to crafting and fabrication

The exhibition "Beauty is the First Test" runs form 27 April – 30 June 2013 at The National Centre for Craft & Design, Navigation Wharf, Carre Street, Sleaford, Lincolnshire NG34, UK.

"The group show explores how mathematical concepts underpin craft techniques, aiming to 'demystify a subject that intimates both adults and children', according to the centre. The exhibition demonstrates how mathematics is the foundation of activities such as knitting, stitching, measuring and cutting that are crucial to crafting and fabrication. Showcasing works in disciplines including textiles and sculpture, the show will feature work from artists including Michael Brennand–Wood, Janice Gunner, Lucy McMullen and Ann Sutton.

Alongside the visual proof that maths can indeed be fun – and pretty – the exhibition also presents case studies of five makers, including Gail Baxter and Margo Selby, exploring how the development of their work was furthered by an understanding and appreciation of mathematics."

(Emily Gosling, 27 March 2013, Design Week)

Fig.1 Janette Matthews, "Optical Ellipse". Fig.2 Ann Sutton, "Four Ways from a Square", 2009.

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2013algorithmic art • Ann Sutton • Beauty is the First Test (exhibition) • computational aestheticscraft techniquescraftingDesign Weekexhibition • fractal art • Gail Baxter • geometric abstractiongeometric formsgeometric shapes • Godfrey Hardy • group exhibitionharmony • Janette Matthews • Janice Gunner • knitting • Lesley Halliwell • Lucy McMullen • Margo Selby • mathematical abstractionmathematical conceptsmathematical patternmathematicsmaths • Michael Brennand-Wood • National Centre for Craft and Designpattern • Peter Randall-Page • sculpture • spirograph • Stella Harding • Suresh Dutt • textilesvisual abstractionweaving

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 APRIL 2012

Boundary Functions: personal space exists only in relation to others and changes without our control

"Boundary Functions shows us that personal space exists only in relation to others and changes without our control. ...

By projecting the diagram, the invisible relationships between individuals and the space between them become visible and dynamic. The intangible notion of personal space and the line that always exists between you and another becomes concrete. The installation doesn't function at all with one person, as it requires a physical relationship to someone else. In this way Boundary Functions is a reversal of the lonely self–reflection of virtual reality, or the frustration of virtual communities: here is a virtual space that can only exist with more than one person, and in physical space.

The title, Boundary Functions, refers to Theodore Kaczynski's 1967 University of Michigan PhD thesis. Better known as the Unabomber, Kaczynski is a pathological example of the conflict between the individual and society: engaging with an imperfect world versus an individual solitude uncompromised by the presence of others. The thesis itself is an example of the implicit antisocial quality of some scientific discourse, mired in language and symbols that are impenetrable to the vast majority of society. In this installation, a mathematical abstraction is made instantly knowable by dynamic visual representation."

(Scott Snibbe, 1998)

Fig.1 Scott Snibbe (1998). "Boundary Functions".

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TAGS

1998art installationboundariesboundary functionsdynamic visual representationdynamically changingfloorgeometryindividualindividual and society • individual solitude • installationinteraction patternsinteractive artinteractive floorinteractive projection • Jonathan Shewchuk • linesmathematical abstractionmathematicspartition of spacepatternpatternspersonal spacephysical interaction • physical relationship • physical spaceprojected from overhead • proxemics • psychology • regions • relationships between individuals • scientific discourse • Scott Snibbesocial interaction • social relationships • Theodore Kaczynski • unabombervideo trackingvirtual spacevoronoiVoronoi diagram

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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