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Which clippings match 'Corporations' keyword pg.1 of 1
06 JUNE 2019

Astroturfing: corporate interests disguised as spontaneous popular movements

"The term 'astroturfing' is a play on the term 'grassroots movement,' since the grass is fake. Astroturfing has been attempted by online businesses who present a product as being highly desired and sought out by a certain customer base via company-sponsored message board posts, blogs or articles when there is no evidence to support such an assertion."

(BigCommerce)

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TAGS

advocacy groups • astroturf kingpin • astroturfing • astroturfing (phenomenon) • authentic response • authenticitybaseless claimsbelieving lies to be true • block legislation • campaign advertisingcognitive dissonanceconservative ideologyconservative think tankcontradictory narratives • controversial practice • corporate behaviour • corporate bullying • corporate lobbyingcorporations • corrupt practices • credibility • deceitful practices • deceitfulnessdeceptiondeliberate intention to misleaddiscrediting expertsdishonestydrunk drivingemotive manipulation • Employment Policy Institute • fake • fake grass-roots • fake grassroots movements • fake news • fake personas • fake reviews • fallacious argumentsfalse claims • falsified testimony • food safetygrass rootsgrassroots movement • hidden funding • illusion and reality • illusion of a populist idea. • inference • John Oliver • Last Week Tonight • Last Week Tonight with John Oliver HBO • lobbying • lobbyist • marketing practicesmemesmetaphorical representation • minimum wage • misleading message • misleading practices • mistruths • non-profit front groups • outreach • oversimplification • paid sick leave • perception management • pretending to be unbiased • public advocacy groups • public interest • public outreach • public-interest groups • Richard Berman • Rick Berman • secondhand cigarette smoke • sockpuppets • spontaneous popular movements • testimonies • the illusion of authenticity • undercover marketingunethical behaviourwhat is really happening

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 APRIL 2012

Cooperation and collaboration: problem solving and problem finding

"The economists Richard Lester and Michael Piore have studied the firms that sought to create the switching technology, finding that cooperation and collaboration within certain companies allowed them to make headway on the switching technology problem, whereas internal competition at other corporations diminished engineers' efforts to improve the quality of the switches. Motorola, a success story, developed what it called a 'technology shelf,' created by a small group of engineers, on which were placed possible technical solutions that other teams might use in the future; rather than trying to solve the problem outright, it developed tools whose immediate value was not clear. Nokia grappled with the problem in another collaborative way, creating an open–ended conversation among its engineers in which salespeople and designers were often included. The boundaries among business units in Nokia were deliberately ambiguous, because more than technical information was needed to get a feeling for the problem; lateral thinking was required. Lester and Piore describe the process of communication this entailed as 'fluid, context–dependent, undetermined.'[20]

By contrast, companies like Ericsson proceeded with more seeming clarity and discipline, dividing the problem into its parts. The birth of the new switch was intended to occur through 'the exchange of information' among offices 'rather than the cultivation of an interpretative community.'[21] Rigidly organized, Ericsson fell away. It did eventually solve the switching technology problem, but with greater difficulty; different offices protected their turf. In any organization, individuals or teams that compete and are rewarded for doing better than others will hoard information. In technology firms, hoarding information particularly disables good work.

The corporations that succeeded through cooperation shared with the Linux community that experimental mark of technological craftsmanship, the intimate, fluid join between problem solving and problem finding. Within the framework of competition, by contrast, clear standards of achievement and closure are needed to measure performance and to dole out rewards.

[20] Richard K. Lester and Michael J. Piore, Innovation, the Missing Dimension (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2004), 98.

[21] Ibid., 104."

(Richard Sennett, 2008, pp.32–33)

1). Sennett, R. (2008). "The Craftsman". New Haven & London, Yale University Press.

TAGS

2008boundaries • business units • clarity and discipline • closurecollaborationcommunicationcommunication processcompetitioncompetitive teams • context-dependent communication • cooperationcooperation and collaborationcorporationscraftsmanship • deliberately ambiguous • designers • dividing problems into parts • dole out rewards • engagementengineers • fluid communication • framework of competition • hoarding information • information exchangeinformation in context • internal competition • interpretative community • lateral thinkingLinux • Linux community • measure performance • Michael Piore • MotorolaNokia • open-ended conversation • participationperformanceperformativityproblem findingproblem solving and problem findingproblem-solvingreward • Richard Lester • Richard SennettsalespeopleshareSony Ericssonstandards of achievementsuccess • switching technology • technical information • technical solutions • technological craftsmanship • technology shelf • The Craftsman • undetermined communication • working methods

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JUNE 2005

The Corporation: provocative account charting the evolution and powerful influence of the contemporary business corporation

"Provoking, witty, stylish and sweepingly informative, THE CORPORATION explores the nature and spectacular rise of the dominant institution of our time. Part film and part movement, The Corporation is transforming audiences and dazzling critics with its insightful and compelling analysis. Taking its status as a legal 'person' to the logical conclusion, the film puts the corporation on the psychiatrist's couch to ask 'What kind of person is it?'"

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