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Which clippings match 'Standing On The Shoulders Of Giants' keyword pg.1 of 1
20 DECEMBER 2013

Kirby Ferguson: Embracing the remix



2012Android OSAppleauthorship • behavioural finance theory • Bill BuxtonBob Dylan • borrow • Brian Burton • building on the work of others • Carter Family • celebrated creators • citation as a form of persuasioncopycopyingcopyrightcopyright law • core technology • creative workscreativitycultural productiondesign innovation • Dominic Behan • everything is a remix • good artists copy great artists steal • graphical user interfacegreat ideasHenry FordiPhone • Jean Ritchie • Jeff Han • Kirby Ferguson • loss aversion • multi-fingered gestures • multi-touch technologiesnew medianothing is original • Nottamun Town • originalityoriginality is non-existentownershipPablo Picasso • patent law • patent registration • Paul Clayton • private property • property analogy • remixremix cultureremixingrip • shameless stealing • standing on the shoulders of giants • stealing • Steve Jobs • stolen product • TED Talks • Woody Guthrie • Xerox PARC


Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2006

Liveplasma: mapping cultural relatedness

"liveplasma is a new way to broaden your cultural horizons according to your taste in music and movies. Look for your favourite bands, movies or directors to obtain a map that details other potential interests."



Mia Thornton
25 OCTOBER 2005

Citation as a form of persuasion

"Weinstock (1971) lists 15 discrete 'reasons for using citations', including 'paying homage to pioneers; giving credit for related work; identifying methodology, equipment, etc; ... criticising previous work, substantiating claims; ... disclaiming work or ideas of others; disputing priority claims of others'. More parsimoniously, Chubin and Moitra (1975) categorise references as, broadly, affirmative and negational. They subdivide the affirmative group into basic and subsidiary, additional and perfunctory, and the negational group into partial and total. Within physics, which they take as the basis for their analysis, they find very few partially negational references and no totally negational ones – a point to be taken up in the subsequent discussion of academic controversy. Gilbert (1977b) argues that the main function of referencing is to act as a covert form of persuasion; and, in staunch ethnomethodological tradition, Small (1978) contends that cited documents serve as 'concept symbols' – 'in citing a document the author is creating its meaning': besides 'its functional, social and political implications', citation may be used 'to curry favour, to publicise, to favour one approach over another', and so on."
(Tony Becher, p.87)

Becher, Tony. 1989 "Academic Tribes and Territories: Intellectual Enquiry and the Cultures of Disciplines", Milton Keynes, UK: Open University Press.

Chubin, D. E. and Moitra, S. (1975) Content analysis of references. Social Studies of Science, 5, pp. 423–41
Gilbert, G. (1977b) Referencing as persuasion. Social Studies of Science, 7, pp. 113–22
Small, H. (1978) Cited documents as concept symbols. Social Studies of Science, 8, pp. 327–40.

Fig.1 CDRyan, 2008. COMMANDS. Series of 3 Digital Prints, 5 x 7 inches Atmostheory



Chubin • citationcitation as a form of persuasionciteconcept symbolsconceptualisationcreditingenquiry • G. Nigel Gilbert • Harvard Referencing System • Henry Small • insight • Michael Weinstock • Moitra • paying homagepersuasionprecedencereferenceresearchstanding on the shoulders of giantstheory building • Tony Becher

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