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Which clippings match 'Hierarchical Visualisation' keyword pg.1 of 2
23 FEBRUARY 2014

Beautiful Science: Picturing Data, Inspiring Insight

20 February – 26 May 2014, Folio Society Gallery; admission free, London.

"Turning numbers into pictures that tell important stories and reveal the meaning held within is an essential part of what it means to be a scientist. This is as true in today's era of genome sequencing and climate models as it was in the 19th century.

Beautiful Science explores how our understanding of ourselves and our planet has evolved alongside our ability to represent, graph and map the mass data of the time.

From John Snow's plotting of the 1854 London cholera infections on a map to colourful depictions of the tree of life, discover how picturing scientific data provides new insight into our lives."

(The British Library)

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17th century • 1854 • 185819th centurybattlefield • Beautiful Science (exhibition) • big dataBritish Librarycartographychart • cholera • climate models • climate science • colourful depictions • Crimean War • datadata journalismdata visualisation • David McCandless • David Spiegelhalter • diseaseevolutionexhibition • Florence Nightingale • genome • genome sequencing • graph • Great Chain of Being (1617) • hierarchical visualisationhospitalillustrated diagramsinfographicinteractive visualisationinterpret meaningsinterpreting data • Johanna Kieniewicz • John Snow • London • Luke Howard • maps • Martin Krzywinski • mass data • Nigel ShadboltOpen Data Institute • picturing data • picturing scientific data • public health • Robert Fludd • rose diagram • Sally Daviesscience • science collections • science exhibition • seeing is believing • statisticstechnological changetree of lifeturning numbers into meaningvisual interpretationvisual representationvisual representation graphicallyvisual representations of scientific conceptsvisualising dataweather • William Farr • Winton Capita

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JULY 2013

Pioneering 1968 demo of experimental computer technologies

"On December 9, 1968, Douglas C. Engelbart and the group of 17 researchers working with him in the Augmentation Research Center at Stanford Research Institute in Menlo Park, CA, presented a 90–minute live public demonstration of the online system, NLS, they had been working on since 1962. The public presentation was a session of the Fall Joint Computer Conference held at the Convention Center in San Francisco, and it was attended by about 1,000 computer professionals. This was the public debut of the computer mouse. But the mouse was only one of many innovations demonstrated that day, including hypertext, object addressing and dynamic file linking, as well as shared–screen collaboration involving two persons at different sites communicating over a network with audio and video interface."

(Stanford University Libraries)

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1960s1968Augmentation Research Center at SRIBerkeley (University of California)computer historycomputer mousecomputer networksdemoDouglas Engelbart • Fall Joint Computer Conference • HCIhierarchical visualisation • human communication • human-computer interactionhyperlinkhypertexthypertext systeminformation spaces • information structures • information systems • interactive computing • keyboardlinking • multimedia demonstration • networked computer system • networked telecommunications systems • NLS • oN-Line System (NLS) • pioneeringpioneering technologySan Francisco • Stanford Research Institute • Stanford Universitytechnology pioneerUC Berkeley • video teleconferencing • videoconferencingvisionary ideaswindows metaphor • word processing • word processor • workstation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JANUARY 2012

Pearltrees: a place to store and collect you stuff

"Pearltrees lets you keep at hand the web pages you like, discover some new ones in your areas of interest and share them easily with your friends."

(Pearltrees)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JANUARY 2011

Flash web application prototypes

I created a series of Flash web application prototypes between 2002 and 2003. I did so as part of my design experimentation and growing interest in software design. As a result the prototypes were very limited in their scope as they tended to focus on particular concepts or techniques. For example I created my Kiwifruit prototype to explore an approach to updating database records which removed the need for users to make explicit update/submit decisions; I created my Rhizome prototype to explore approaches to contextual grouping and association; and I created my in–flight meal booking prototype to test some ideas I had about interactive information design. I developed the applications using a combination of Macromedia (Adobe) Flash, PHP, XML and MySQL. The prototypes now stand as a useful reminder of the promise that Flash offered in the early part of this century – before HTML5, the iPad and responsive layout etc.

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20022003Adobe Flash • airline catering • airline meal • design experimentationdesign practicedesign prototypeshierarchical visualisation • in-flight meals • KIB810 Information Architecture • kiwifruit • Macromedia Flash • mealMySQLnodal structureorganisational relationshippersonal praxispersonal researchPHPpre-prepared mealprogrammingrhizomatic structurerhizomorphousSimon Perkinstechnical developmenttechnical knowledgeweb applicationXML

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 AUGUST 2009

PaperScope: a tool for graphically representing reference and citation chains

"PaperScope is a tool for graphically exploring the Astrophysics Data System (ADS) which is a database of published astrophysics papers. PaperScope is extremely useful for identifying the citation/reference relationships between papers, and enables the user to visualize these relationships to make locating papers of interest easier. Use it for constructing reference or citation chains, as well as identifying common references/citations between several key papers. It is a tool designed to simplify the process of searching for relevant papers to an astrophysics researcher whether they be a professor, post doc, or student."
(Mark Holliman, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh)

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ads • Astro Grid • astronomyastrophysics • Astrophysics Data System • citation • citation chains • cone treedatabasediscursive field • e-Infrastructure • Edinburghgraphic representationhierarchical visualisationhierarchyICTinformation graphicsintegrationJava • Mark Holliman • metadatanotationordering • PaperScope • precedencepublishreference • reference chains • relationshipsrepositoryresearchresearch papers • Royal Observatory Edinburgh • technologytoolvisual depictionvisualisation • WFAU

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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