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Which clippings match 'Future Forecasting' keyword pg.1 of 2
25 NOVEMBER 2014

Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974

"The year is 1974, and Arthur C. Clarke is standing inside one of those cavernous computer centers that held the massive machines of the day. ...

He doesn't call it the internet. But he says that even before the dawn of the twenty–first century, the boy's home will include a computer console – something much smaller than those massive machines humming in the background in 1974 – that provides 'all the information he needs for his everyday life: his bank statements, his theater reservations, all the information you need over the course of living in a complex modern society.' ...

'They will make it possible to live really anywhere we like. Any businessman, any executive, could live almost anywhere on Earth and still do his business through a device like this,' he says. 'It means we won't be stuck in cities. We'll live out in the country or wherever we please and still carry on complete interactions with other human beings as well as computers.' Our cities haven't exactly shrunk. But we're certainly able to connect with each other from wherever we might be."

(Cade Metz , March 2013, Wired.com)

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TAGS

19742001ABC TV (Australia) • Arthur C Clarke • Australian Broadcasting Corporation • computer centre • computer console • connected worldconnectivity • every household • future forecastingfuturisthome computer • household computer • Internetpredicting the futurepunch cards • punch-card reader • science fiction writer • tape drives • translocationWired (magazine)world connectivity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 OCTOBER 2014

Speculative Everything: Design, Fiction, and Social Dreaming

"Today designers often focus on making technology easy to use, sexy, and consumable. In Speculative Everything, Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby propose a kind of design that is used as a tool to create not only things but ideas. For them, design is a means of speculating about how things could be–to imagine possible futures. This is not the usual sort of predicting or forecasting, spotting trends and extrapolating; these kinds of predictions have been proven wrong, again and again. Instead, Dunne and Raby pose 'what if' questions that are intended to open debate and discussion about the kind of future people want (and do not want).

Speculative Everything offers a tour through an emerging cultural landscape of design ideas, ideals, and approaches. Dunne and Raby cite examples from their own design and teaching and from other projects from fine art, design, architecture, cinema, and photography. They also draw on futurology, political theory, the philosophy of technology, and literary fiction. They show us, for example, ideas for a solar kitchen restaurant; a flypaper robotic clock; a menstruation machine; a cloud–seeding truck; a phantom–limb sensation recorder; and devices for food foraging that use the tools of synthetic biology. Dunne and Raby contend that if we speculate more–about everything–reality will become more malleable. The ideas freed by speculative design increase the odds of achieving desirable futures."

(Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby, 2013)

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TAGS

2013alternative visionsAnthony Dunne • Belgrade • Belgrade New Media Festival • Charles Avery • conceptual designdesign approachesdesign idealsdesign ideasDesign Interactions (MA) • desirable futures • emerging cultural landscape • extrapolating • Fiona Raby • Frederik Pohl • future contextsfuture forecastingfuturology • how things could be • ictional scenarios • idealism • ideas freed by speculative design • interaction design • literary fiction • Michio Kaku • modelling possible realities • new media festival • open debate and discussion • philosophy of technologyPhysics of the Impossible (2008)political theory • possible futures • potential futures • predictions • Resonate festival • Royal College of Art • scenario building • sci-fiscience fiction • social dreaming • speculative design • Speculative Everything Design (2013) • speculative fictionsuspend disbelief • the future people want • Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance • we speculate • what if

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 OCTOBER 2014

Co-design at JISC

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City University Londonco-design • collaborative innovation model • competence as a practitioner • competency-based education • competency-based learning • customer needs • customer priorities • Diana Oblinger • Educauseflipping the classroomfunding bodiesfurther educationfuture forecastingfuture needsfuturist • futurologist • higher education landscape • higher education sectorJISC • Martin Hall • Martyn Harrow • new opportunitiesonline lectures • Paul Curran • pressing issues • Ray Hammond • research professionalisation • steering group • technology and designUK educationUK innovation • University of Salford

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 OCTOBER 2013

Prendi's vision for the Store of the Future

"As consumers become increasingly more connected and use multiple shopping channels, smart retailers are starting to develop their version of 'Store of the Future' and taking an 'omni channel ' approach. This will vary from business to business and will not look the same for everyone but it will involve digital technology, integration and delivering personal, relevant experiences to your customers."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 JULY 2013

Futuristic fashions: Eve, A.D. 2000!

"Futuristic fashions 1939 style include a dress that can be adapted for day or evening wear, complete with sun–visor (and African–American maid), and a dress made of transparent net with a towering 60s–style hairdo (wouldn't look out of place on a millennium catwalk). The next two outfits are pretty transparent too; then a bridal gown with a cellophane veil and another adaptable dress.

The suit for the man of 2000 looks like a boiler suit with wide chain mail over the top. A circular aerial is worn on the head, to pick up signals for his mobile phone and radio. He also has two natty silver boxes attached to his belt 'for coins, keys and candy for cuties'. The beard is marcel–waved and he has buns of hair at the side of his head. Not a particularly manly look!"

(British Pathé)

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TAGS

1930s19392000 • 2000 AD • adaptable dress • aerial • African-American • beard • boiler suit • bridal gownBritish Pathe • candy for cuties • catwalkcellophane • chain mail • clothing • day wear • dress • Eve • evening wear • fashion designfashion forecastingfuture forecastingfuturistic design • futuristic fashions • futuristic visionhair • hairdo • maid • manly look • millenniummobile phone • natty • newsreel • outfit • Pathetone Weekly • portable radio • predictionretrofuturismstylesuit • sun visor • transparencyveilwomens clothingwomenswear

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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