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Which clippings match 'Abstraction Layer' keyword pg.1 of 1
26 MAY 2014

Propel: Object-Relational Mapping (ORM) for SQL-Databases



2005abstraction layer • Composer (dependency manager) • CRUD (acronym) • data-driven • database schema • database structures • dependency manager • GitHubJSONMITMySQLobject-oriented design • Object-Relational Mapping (ORM) • object-relational mapping toolkit • ORM • PHP • PostgreSQL • Propel (ORM) • query-builder • reverse engineeringsoftware abstractionsoftware engineeringsoftware framework • SQLite • Symfony (PHP framework) • toolkit • web application developer • web application developmentXML • YAML


Simon Perkins
22 FEBRUARY 2014

An Introduction to the Federated Social Network

"To understand how federated social networking would be an improvement, we should understand how online social networking essentially works today. Right now, when you sign up for Facebook, you get a Facebook profile, which is a collection of data about you that lives on Facebook's servers. You can add words and pictures to your Facebook profile, and your Facebook profile can have a variety of relationships – it can be friends with other Facebook profiles, it can be a 'fan' of another Facebook page, or 'like' a web page containing a Facebook widget. Crucially, if you want to interact meaningfully with anyone else's Facebook profile or any application offered on the Facebook platform, you have to sign up with Facebook and conduct your online social networking on Facebook's servers, and according to Facebook's rules and preferences. (You can replace 'Facebook' with 'Orkut,' 'LinkedIn,' 'Twitter,' and essentially tell the same story.)

We've all watched the dark side of this arrangement unfold, building a sad catalog of the consequences of turning over data to a social networking company. The social networking company might cause you to overshare information that you don't want shared, or might disclose your information to advertisers or the government, harming your privacy. And conversely, the company may force you to undershare by deleting your profile, or censoring information that you want to see make it out into the world, ultimately curbing your freedom of expression online. And because the company may do this, governments might attempt to require them to do it, sometimes even without asking or informing the end–user.

How will federated social networks be different? The differences begin with the code behind online social networking. The computer code that gives you a Facebook profile is built in a closed way – it's proprietary and kept relatively secret by Facebook, so you have to go through Facebook to create, maintain, and interact with Facebook profiles or applications.

But federated social network developers are doing two things differently in order to build a new ecosystem. First, the leading federated social networking software is open–source: that means that anybody can download the source code, and use it to create and maintain social networking profiles for themselves and others. Second, the developers are simultaneously collaborating on a new common language, presumably seeking an environment where most or even all federated social networking profiles can talk to one another.

What will that likely mean in practice? To join a federated social network, you'll be able to choose from an array of 'profile providers,' just like you can choose an email provider. You will even be able to set up your own server and provide your social networking profile yourself. And in a federated social network, any profile can talk to another profile – even if it's on a different server.

Imagine the Web as an open sea. To use Facebook, you have to immigrate to Facebook Island and get a Facebook House, in a land with a single ruler. But the distributed social networks being developed now will allow you to choose from many islands, connected to one another by bridges, and you can even have the option of building your own island and your own bridges."

(Richard Esguerra, 21 March 21 2011, Electronic Frontier Foundation)



2011abstraction layeragency of access and engagementautonomy • centralised infrastructure • centralised platformcommon interfaceComputer Supported Cooperative Work • content distribution networks • data contextdecentralisation • decentralised architecture • decentralised infrastructure • distributed ecosystemdistributed models • distributed social network • Distributed Social Networking (DOSN) • distributed social networks • distributed systemElectronic Frontier Foundation • Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP) • Facebook • Federated Social Networks (FSN) • Google Wave Federation Protocol • hCard • information ecosysteminteroperabilityknowledge commonsLinkedInlocalisationmultiplatform • OAuth • Online Social Networks (OSN) • open architecture • open protocol • Open Stack • open standardsOpenID • OpenSocial • Orkut • OStatus • peer-to-peer exchange • Portable Contacts (open protocol) • social network aggregation services • software portability • structural abstraction • system scalability • technology integrationTwitter • user application data • user autonomy • Wave Federation Protocol • web feeds • web services • XFN • XRD


Simon Perkins
19 APRIL 2012

Bryan Rieger: Rethinking the Mobile Web

"A few months back I submitted the smallest speck of an idea for a talk I was hoping to present at Over The Air in London. Having presented at Over The Air before I assumed my experiences this time around would more or less be the same – a chance to bounce a few of my recent thoughts off two–dozen or so UK developers.

To suggest that my assumption was wrong would in–fact be a massive understatement...

Three weeks later, the dust is still settling on the 90,000 140,000 presentation views, hundreds of tweets, and multitude of conversations, and I finally have time to provide the presentation with a much–needed introduction."

(Bryan Rieger)

Fig.1 "Rethinking the Mobile Web" by Yiibu



abstraction layer • accessible and inclusive mobile experiences • adaptive layoutAJAXAndroid OSApple • Bada • BlackBerry LtdBMW • Bryan Rieger • cHTML • CSS animations • CSS3device • DeviceAtlas • feature phone • featurephone • Fennec • Google (GOOG)HTMLHTML5Internet accessInternet ExploreriOSiPhone • Java ME • JavaME • market sharemedia queries • media types • MicroB • mobile browsermobile devices • mobile internet users • mobile operating systems • mobile web • most used devices • Nokia • Nokia Qt • Obigo • OBML • one web • Opera Binary Markup Language • OperaMini • optimised for mobile • Over The Air • Palm (OS) • phone • popular devices • presentation • real web • Rethinking the Mobile Web • Samsung • Skyfire • SlideSharesmartphoneSony Ericsson • SquirrelFish • standards support • SVG • Symbian • tabbed browsingtechnology • UK developers • w810i • WAP • WebKit • WebOS • William GibsonWindows Mobile • WML • WURFL • Yii


Simon Perkins

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