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Which clippings match 'North America' keyword pg.3 of 6
05 NOVEMBER 2012

MOOCs from Australia Coming to North America

"The University of New England (UNE) in Australia, a leader in online learning and distance education, announced that it will begin researching and pursuing North American partnerships for the deployment of free courses and highly scalable MOOCs. To accelerate the effort, UNE will send representatives to Educause 2012 in Denver, Colorado next week to conduct discussions with interested organizations."

(Peter Rasmussen, 1 November 2012, Gilfus Education Group)

TAGS

2012AustraliaDenverdistance educationEducause • Educause 2012 • Educause Quarterly • free courses • Gilfus Education Group • low cost degrees • Massive Open Online CoursesMOOCsNorth Americaonline learningopen coursewarepartnerships • scalable solution • UNE • University of New England

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 APRIL 2012

An American Family: the genesis of reality television

"Unlike most documentaries of its day, An American Family had no host, no interviews, and almost no voice–over narration. Producer Craig Gilbert presented the family's daily life – as captured by filmmakers Alan Raymond behind the camera, and Susan Raymond covering sound – in the style of cinéma vérité. It was the most controversial and talked–about television program of its era.

PBS was then a fledgling 'fourth network' joining CBS, NBC and ABC, and despite its non–commercial profile was looking for blockbuster hits, according to Bill Kobin, Vice President for programming at NET at the time. In the course of its 12 week run, An American Family riveted the country and drew in a record 10 million viewers a week. In the years since it was first broadcast, the series has become the subject of lengthy articles and reviews, including panel discussions with anthropologist Margaret Mead, who speculated that An American Family could be the beginning of a new way to explore the complexities of contemporary reality, 'maybe as important for our time as were the invention of drama and the novel for earlier generations.'

Now, 40 years since filming, the original filmmakers have edited a new 2–hour feature–length special capturing the most memorable and compelling moments of the landmark series. See for yourself why An American Family is one of the 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time (TV Guide, 2002)."

Public Broadcasting Service (PBS)

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TAGS

197119721973 • Alan Raymond • American family lifeAn American Family • Bill Kobin • Bill Loud • cinema verite • contemporary reality • Craig Gilbert • cultural anthropologydaily life • Delilah Loud • direct cinemadocumentaryethnographic filmfamilyfamily lifefly-on-the-wall • Grant Loud • Kevin Loud • Lance Loud • landmark series • Loud family • Margaret Mead • Michele Loud • non-commercialnon-fiction televisionNorth Americaobservational seriesobservational style • Pat Loud • PBSportrait of a familyportrait of family lifereal behaviourrealityreality televisionsocial reality • Susan Raymond • televisiontelevision documentarytelevision programmetelevision series • The Louds • The Raymonds • TV • video verite • visual anthropology • WNET

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 SEPTEMBER 2011

Digital History: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

"Lisa Fischer is Director of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation's Digital History Center (DHC). Located in the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, the DHC was created to harness new technologies to help in engaging the public in the continuing conversation about the American Revolution, citizenship, and democracy. The DHC is currently working on a several complementary projects ranging from the creation of a new comprehensive website on the on the American Revolution to 'Virtual Williamsburg,' an initiative to create an interactive 3D model of the town as it looked in 1776 in collaboration with the University of Virginia's Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH)."

(16 February 2010)

Fig.1 Tom Ellis (2010 ). presentation by Lisa Fischer, Director of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation's Digital History Center.

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TAGS

1700s • 177618th century3D model3D visualisationarchaeologycolonial • Colonial Williamsburg Foundation • costumecultural heritagecultural history • DHC • digital historydigital toolshistorical interpretationhistorical maphistorical reenactmenthistorical research • IATH • interactive 3D • interactive environmentsinteractive map • Lisa Fischer • living history museummuseummuseum of cultural historyNorth America • North American Revolution • open-air museumperiod lifereconstructed buildingsreconstructionreenactmentrestorationtheme park • town • University of Virginia • Virginia • virtual heritage • virtual models • Virtual Williamsburg • visualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JUNE 2011

North American Progress: expansion as a spiritualised feminine figure

"George Crofutt, publisher of a fashionable western travel guide series, commissioned the creation of 'American Progress' by the Brooklyn resident, painter, and lithographer, John Gast. Crofutt reproduced the petite painting, done in 1872, as a color lithograph poster and also engraved the image in the guidebooks he published widely circulating the image. The painting depicts a sense of technological development's advancement upon the untamed land like the coming of an impenetrable, inevitable militia with one uncharacteristic exception––the company is led by a feminine figure.

In the wake of four years of Civil War, the creation of the promotional material of 'American Progress' portrays a spiritualized feminine that provides nurturing, protective guidance and fortitude for the extension of civilization over wilderness and the 'uncivilized,' the enigmatic, and the primal. Disembodied, the idealized feminine portrays the evolution of the split of spirit from daily life as well as the sanctified superiority of the immigrants above human beings who lived in harmony with the spirit of the land.

The dominating and centralized angelic being's paradoxical innocence and sensually alluring presence has the effect of distracting and softening the reality and the violence of this movement to 'win the west' where Native Americans depart the frame as non– natives stake claims in the form of prospectors, as settlers: farmers, homesteaders, and travelers. One of the popular artists of the times, Maynard Dixon speaks of the untruth of the romanticized representation of facts as he complained he was being paid to lie in his artwork and portrayals of life on the wild prairie (Dixon).

Fueled by an underlying desire to be free from tyrannical government and the prospect of a new life and livelihood in a world new to them, Euro–Americans manifested suffering and persecution similar to the very situation they sought to escape."

(Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism)

Fig.1 John Gast (1872). "American Progress", painting: oil

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TAGS

1872 • American Progress (painting) • ARAS • Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism • artworkcivil war • civilising • colonial expansioncolonisationcolour lithographdivine destinydivine providenceexpansionism • farmers • feminine figure • George Crofutt • guidebook • homesteaders • ideologyIndigenous • John Gast • manifest destiny • Maynard Dixon • national park • Native AmericansnativesNorth Americanurturingpainterpainting • popular artist • poster • prairie • progresspromotional material • protective guidance • romantic sublimeromanticised • sanctified superiority • settlementspiritualsymbolismtechnological developmentterritoryThe West • travel guide series • travellers • uncivilised • untamed land • untamed wilderness • wildwilderness

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 MAY 2011

The Fluxus Reader offers the first comprehensive overview on this challenging and controversial group

"Fluxus began in the 1950s as a loose, international community of artists, architects, composers and designers. By the 1960s, Fluxus has become a laboratory of ideas and an arena for artistic exprmentation in Europe, Asia and the United States. Described as 'the most radical and experimental art movement of the 1960s', Fluxus challenged conventional thinking on art and culture for over four decades. It had a central role in the birth of such key contemporary art forms as concept art, installation, performance art, intermedia and video. Despite this influence, the scope and scale of this unique phenomenon have made it difficult to explain Fluxus in normative historical and critical terms. The Fluxus Reader offers the first comprehensive overview on this challenging and controversial group. The Fluxus Reader is written by leading scholars and experts from Europe and the United States."

(Ken Friedman, Swinburne Research Bank)

Fig.1 Robert Watts (1965). 'TV Dinner' from the exhibition Art in Our Time: 1950 to the Present, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, September 5, 1999 to September 2, 2001.

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TAGS

1950sarchitectsart and cultureart movement • artistic experimentation • artistic practiceartistsAsiaAustraliaavant-gardechallenging conventional thinking • composers • concept art • contemporary art forms • creative practicecritiquedesignersEuropeexperimentalFluxus • Fluxus Reader • installationintermediainternational communityjournal • laboratory of ideas • North Americaperformance artpre-prepared mealradical • Swinburne University • video art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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