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Which clippings match 'North America' keyword pg.1 of 6
22 FEBRUARY 2017

“Bang bang” di Umberto e Stefano Cinquini

"Nell’America che ha eletto Donald Trump nuovo Presidente degli Stati Uniti c’è chi si batte per la difesa del diritto costituzionale e al porto delle armi da fuoco. Ma le conseguenze ce la racconta la cronaca con il lungo elenco di delitti o di incidenti per l’uso domestico di pistole e fucili. Come se fossimo in un moderno Saloon del Far West Donald Trump è, per i costruttori, il simbolo di tutto ciò."

(Carnevale di Viareggio, 2017)

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2017 • American Idiot (2009) • American politics • Bang Bang (2017) • caricature • Carnevale di Viareggio • carnival • carnival float • cowboycritical commentarydepictions of real-life peopledistorted appearanceDonald Trumpentertainment spectacleexaggerated appearance • float designer • forelock • giant marionettegunshumouriconic imagery • Italian design • Mexican • Muslim • myth of the West • neon-litNorth Americaparody • political statement • politician caricaturepuppet • satirical float • satirical representation • Statue of Liberty • Stefano Cinquini • Thank God Im a Country Boy (1974) • The West • Tuscany • Umberto Cinquini • Viareggio • Wild West frontier

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 FEBRUARY 2016

Grammar comes to students as an abstract whole

"The Reed-Kellogg diagram is a tool of the classroom and of the textbooks that codify the rules for its production. But grammar textbooks share a problem similar to the one Thomas Kuhn noted for science textbooks: they tend to efface the history of their subject. Indeed, grammar textbooks are far more ahistorical that science textbooks. The average science textbook will contain some history, however Whiggish. There will be at least a cursory mention of the scientists who formulated the theories under discussion, some suggestion that scientific knowledge is subject to change and accretion. Grammar, however, comes to students as an abstract whole. The sources from which the textbook authors derived their accounts normally go unacknowledged. There is no sense of grammar as a theory—or, more precisely, a constellation of competing theories—with its own intellectual history."

(Karl Hagen, 17 October 2015)

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19th century • a constellation of competing theories • abstract whole • ahistorical • Alonzo Reed • analytic grammar • Brainerd Kellogg • change and accretion • diagram • diagramming • diagramming sentences • education • English grammar • etymological parsing • Goold Brown • grammar • grammar as a theory • grammar textbooks • grammarians • grammatical concepts • grammatical pedagogy • grammatical principles • grammatical ruleshigh schoolhistory of ideas and learningintellectual history • Kitty Burns Florey • Lindley Murray • linguistics • morphosyntax • North America • oral parsing • pedagogical method • Reed-Kellog Diagram • Richard Brittain • Robert Lowth • rote recitation • Samuel Kirkham • schoolbook • sentence • sentence diagram • sentence diagramming • sentence structure • symbolic illustration • syntaxsystematic approach • systematic scheme • teaching grammar • textbooksThomas Kuhn • transformational-generative syntax • tree diagram • visual depictions • visual learningvisualisation • Whiggishness

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JANUARY 2015

Public information ad about the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 DECEMBER 2014

Net Neutrality: A Free and Open Internet

"More than any other invention of our time, the Internet has unlocked possibilities we could just barely imagine a generation ago. And here's a big reason we've seen such incredible growth and innovation: Most Internet providers have treated Internet traffic equally. That's a principle known as 'net neutrality' — and it says that an entrepreneur's fledgling company should have the same chance to succeed as established corporations, and that access to a high school student's blog shouldn't be unfairly slowed down to make way for advertisers with more money."

(Barack Obama, 10 November 2014, The White House)

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2014Barack Obama • established corporations • Federal Communications Commission (FCC) • fledgling company • growth and innovation • Internet • Internet provider • internet service providerInternet trafficnet neutralityNorth America • President Obama • United States of America • unlocked possibilities • White House

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 AUGUST 2014

How we made the pop song 19 by Paul Hardcastle

"Then, one night, I was watching TV and happened to tape a documentary–it was ABC's Vietnam Requiem–about the war. When I watched it back, what struck me was how young the soldiers were: the documentary said their average age was 19. I was out having fun in pubs and clubs when I was 19, not being shoved into jungles and shot at. One line–'None of them received a hero's welcome'–really struck a chord. When the soldiers came home, people wondered what had happened to the smiling kids who went out there. What did they expect if they'd been through that shit?

I started messing around and adding music to the narrative. The main sound was electro–I was hugely into Afrika Bambaataa at the time–but I added a bit of jazz and a nice melody. I used an Emu Emulator, an early type of sampler that had a two–second limit when it came to doing samples. That's why the hook was 'N–n–n–nineteen'. It was the only bit of the narrative that made sense in two seconds."

(Interviews by Dave Simpson, The Guardian, 24 September 2012)

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19 (song) • 1980s1985Afrika Bambaataa • anti-war message • audio collageaudio samplesaverage age • British musician • critical commentary • crowd noise • dance musicdestructiondriving beat • Emu Emulator • interview dialogue • Mike Oldfield • military bugle call • news report • nineteen • North America • Paul Hardcastle • Peter Thomas • post-traumatic stress disorder • processed speech • remixsampled musicsamplessoldierspoken-word samplingstutter effect • top selling single • United States Armed Forcesveteran • Vietnam Requiem (1984) • Vietnam warwaryoung men

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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